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Duel boot ubuntu

Go to solution Solved by Kilrah,

For the lulz I reproduced that config on that old setup, connected 2 drives, installed Win10 on one, made an NTFS partition on the other, then shrunk it, then started ubuntu install, selected manual for the partition layout, created a 128MB EFI partition at the beginning of the free space of the 2nd drive and the rest as ext4 mounted as /, and selecting the 2nd drive (the one ubuntu is on) for bootloader install.

 

All went normal and choosing which drive to boot from on the BIOS boot menu correctly boots the OS that's on that drive.

 

Interestingly with the old Radeon GPU the bootloader text is also corrupted (yet works and boots normally), swapping for my GT1030 it displays correctly so I guess the "screen is ramdomily filled with pixel of bootloader" is grub having issues with ancient GPUs...

 

IMG_20210517_145547.thumb.jpg.c59faf4c38ffdfe1a4273eea91908730.jpg

 

IMG_20210517_152755.thumb.jpg.d26986382a1acdf37688615f36f09e06.jpg

 

IMG_20210517_152649.thumb.jpg.9ea8cf7be44dc8718c9ec2bea1ffa222.jpg

 

2032439169_Screenshotfrom2021-05-1715-37-44.thumb.png.2952ca113513d3dda4dd259b53886cf3.png

 

1576096547_Screenshotfrom2021-05-1715-37-48.thumb.png.65b868045c55c2d5375e9fd6f1f7e1a9.png

 

Was a nice reminder of how awful running OSes from HDDs is too...

Hi guys ,

I want to duel boot windows 10 (in SSD) and ubuntu (in hdd) but i want to keep half of my  hdd usable in windows 10 but i dont know how to do it plz help

spec -->

CPU

    Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPUE6700 @ 3.20GHz

    Base speed:    3.19 GHz

Memory

    5.0 GB DDR3

    Speed:    1066 MHz

 

Disk 0 

    OSC SSD 128GB ATA Device

    Capacity:    119 GB
    Formatted:    119 GB

Disk 1

    Hitachi HDS721050CLA662 ATA Device

    Capacity:    466 GB
    Formatted:    466 GB

GPU 0

    NVIDIA GeForce GT 710

 and yes its a legacy system

 

And yes i have tried virtual machine but the performance is very less.

 

 

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In Windows, you'll want to open Disk Management, find your hard drive and shrink your 466GB partition down to around 230 or so gigabytes. Make sure you aren't using over that amount though currently on the hard drive. That should leave you with an NTFS partition on half of the drive and nothing on the other half. Now boot up your Ubuntu installer, and when it asks you where you want to install, make sure you select something along the lines of advanced partitions. Make sure that you select the empty partition on your hard drive. You'll know it's that because Ubuntu will say that it's around 230 GB. Make sure you install it on that partition and make sure that it doesn't touch your SSD or the other partition.

 

I really hope this helps. If you still need some extra help or clarification (sorry I just quickly wrote this up), I'll be happy to quickly spin up a Virtual Machine and walk you through the exact steps of dual booting with screenshots.

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12 minutes ago, NZgamer said:

In Windows, you'll want to open Disk Management, find your hard drive and shrink your 466GB partition down to around 230 or so gigabytes. Make sure you aren't using over that amount though currently on the hard drive. That should leave you with an NTFS partition on half of the drive and nothing on the other half.

In any recent Ubuntu installer there should be an option similar to "Install alongside Windows" where you can simply select how much space you want for Ubuntu and it should do all of these steps for you. So, ideally, manual resizing of partitions shouldn't be needed. The Ubuntu installer should detect the existing Windows installation and can then do this for you.

 

But as @NZgamer said, definitely pay attention to how much space you give Linux, because if you shrink the Windows partition smaller than what it currently uses, chances are your Windows installation is now damaged and unable to boot.

Remember to quote or @mention others, so they are notified of your reply

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While this is 100% possible I would strongly advise against it, for one its going to get very messy with bootloaders doing it this way, I'm not sure how Linux is going to react to having half a drive EXT4 and the other half NTFS but I know for sure Windows will complain about this constantly until you tell it to ignore the Linux partition.

 

The better way (at least IMO) is to split the 450GB in half, install Windows onto one half and have the other half as NTFS storage then use the 128GB solely for Linux. Also don't leave the Windows HDD plugged in while installing Linux otherwise GRUB will get installed onto the Windows drive which can cause serious headaches later down the road. You can add Windows to GRUB later with a simple "sudo update-grub"

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2 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

I'm not sure how Linux is going to react to having half a drive EXT4 and the other half NTFS

It doesn't care at all, and you can access it from linux as normal.

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Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

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Just now, Kilrah said:

It doesn't care at all.

Figured as much but it still makes no sense to do it the way OP wants when you can keep Windows on one drive and Linux on the other.

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Ryzen 7 3800X | Asus ROG Strix X570-F Gaming | 16GB Team Group Dark Pro 3600Mhz | Corsair MP600 1TB PCIe Gen 4 | Sapphire 5700 XT Pulse | Corsair H115i Platinum | WD Black 1TB | WD Green 4TB | EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650W | Asus TUF GT501 | Samsung C27HG70 1440p 144hz HDR FreeSync 2 | Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS |

 

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It very much does if you don't want to be running Windows off a slow ass HDD.

F@H
Desktop: i7-5960X 4.4GHz, Noctua NH-D14, ASUS Rampage V, 32GB, RTX3080, 2TB SX8200Pro, 2x16TB Ironwolf RAID0, Corsair HX1200, Thermaltake Overseer RX1, Samsung 4K curved 49" TV, 23" secondary, Mountain Everest Max

Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

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14 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

It very much does if you don't want to be running Windows off a slow ass HDD.

Dudes rocking an E6700 (LGA775), both the SSD and HDD are connected via SATA 2 anyway.....

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56 minutes ago, NZgamer said:

In Windows, you'll want to open Disk Management, find your hard drive and shrink your 466GB partition down to around 230 or so gigabytes. Make sure you aren't using over that amount though currently on the hard drive. That should leave you with an NTFS partition on half of the drive and nothing on the other half. Now boot up your Ubuntu installer, and when it asks you where you want to install, make sure you select something along the lines of advanced partitions. Make sure that you select the empty partition on your hard drive. You'll know it's that because Ubuntu will say that it's around 230 GB. Make sure you install it on that partition and make sure that it doesn't touch your SSD or the other partition.

 

I really hope this helps. If you still need some extra help or clarification (sorry I just quickly wrote this up), I'll be happy to quickly spin up a Virtual Machine and walk you through the exact steps of dual booting with screenshots.

i have allready did that but when boot into ubuntu its show boot failed

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39 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

In any recent Ubuntu installer there should be an option similar to "Install alongside Windows" where you can simply select how much space you want for Ubuntu and it should do all of these steps for you. So, ideally, manual resizing of partitions shouldn't be needed. The Ubuntu installer should detect the existing Windows installation and can then do this for you.

 

But as @NZgamer said, definitely pay attention to how much space you give Linux, because if you shrink the Windows partition smaller than what it currently uses, chances are your Windows installation is now damaged and unable to boot.

i did that too ubuntu got corrpted after reboot after installation

 

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4 minutes ago, Judgemental0710 said:

i ahve allready did that but when boot into ubuntu its show boot failed

This is likely because Ubuntu no longer supports 32 bit CPUs, you will have to go back to Ubuntu 18.04 for X86 support.

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27 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

Figured as much but it still makes no sense to do it the way OP wants when you can keep Windows on one drive and Linux on the other.

Doesn't matter a bit. I've had Windows and Linux installed on the same 512 GB SSD (with two partitions) for multiple years now. Windows doesn't care or complain. Linux can see both. I've since added a 1 TB SSD and moved my /home directory onto it. Windows doesn't see nor care about this other drive either.

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1 minute ago, Eigenvektor said:

Doesn't matter a bit. I've had Windows and Linux installed on the same 512 GB SSD (with two partitions) for multiple years now. Windows doesn't care or complain. Linux can see both. I've since added a 1 TB SSD and moved my /home directory onto it. Windows doesn't see nor care about this other drive either.

but i want windwos to be on sdd and linux on hdd 

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1 minute ago, Eigenvektor said:

Doesn't matter a bit. I've had Windows and Linux installed on the same 512 GB SSD (with two partitions) for multiple years now. Windows doesn't care or complain. Linux can see both. I've since added a 1 TB SSD and moved my /home directory onto it. Windows doesn't see nor care about this other drive either.

The point wasn't really that it matters, it just seems messy to divide a drive up between NTFS & EXT when there is another NTFS volume already in the system, splitting one drive up between 2 NTFS partitions and having the other drive solely Linux just makes more sense.

 

I guess its just my OCD talking

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Just now, Judgemental0710 said:

but i want windwos to be on sdd and linux on hdd 

Both options should be possible. But as @Master Disaster pointed out, you might have issues with recent versions because your hardware is fairly old. Though as far as I can see it does support 64 bit (Core 2 Duo does, Core Duo does not).

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2 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

Both options should be possible. But as @Master Disaster pointed out, you might have issues with recent versions because your hardware is fairly old. Though as far as I can see it does support 64 bit (Core 2 Duo does, Core Duo does not).

yes my hardware is very old but processer support 64 bit

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/42809/intel-pentium-processor-e6700-2m-cache-3-20-ghz-1066-fsb.html

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2 minutes ago, Judgemental0710 said:

Yes, I saw that already, but it might still be an issue with hardware no longer being supported.

 

Can you provide a bit more info how it is "corrupted"? What kind of error messages do you get?

 

6 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

The point wasn't really that it matters, it just seems messy to divide a drive up between NTFS & EXT when there is another NTFS volume already in the system, splitting one drive up between 2 NTFS partitions and having the other drive solely Linux just makes more sense.

Eh 🤷‍♂️ Not like Windows doesn't create multiple partitions of its own already. Don't see why I should care about a few more. 😛

Spoiler

image.thumb.png.6efcfa74ab9860ec09e81457065742db.png

 

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11 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

Both options should be possible. But as @Master Disaster pointed out, you might have issues with recent versions because your hardware is fairly old. Though as far as I can see it does support 64 bit (Core 2 Duo does, Core Duo does not).

Ahh, I knew it was around the Core era when Intel added X86-64.

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20 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

Yes, I saw that already, but it might still be an issue with hardware no longer being supported.

 

Can you provide a bit more info how it is "corrupted"? What kind of error messages do you get?

 

Eh 🤷‍♂️ Not like Windows doesn't create multiple partitions of its own already. Don't see why I should care about a few more. 😛

  Reveal hidden contents

image.thumb.png.6efcfa74ab9860ec09e81457065742db.png

 

the screen is ramdomily filled with pixel of bootloader

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15 minutes ago, Judgemental0710 said:

the screen is ramdomily filled with pixel of bootloader

Maybe @Master Disaster or @Kilrah have a better idea, but I suspect this might be an issue with the boot loader not properly supporting the Nvidia card. These cards usually require proprietary drivers.

 

For some reason Intel ARK doesn't list an iGPU for this CPU, but I think it does have one. If you have it disabled in BIOS maybe it helps simply enabling it or otherwise removing the discrete GPU until you've installed these drivers. Though I'm not sure what the state of support for the NVIDIA GeForce GT 710 on Linux is, I use AMD myself.

 

Another option might be disabling graphical boot in GRUB and switching to text-only mode, before rebooting when installation is done.

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Screenshot might give ideas...

 

But I have an old C2Q8200 and current Ubuntu runs just fine on it, it's indeed only the Core "not 2" that were 32bit, Core 2 is 64bit. This is a newer "Pentium" though.

iGPU wasn't a thing on desktop parts back then.

F@H
Desktop: i7-5960X 4.4GHz, Noctua NH-D14, ASUS Rampage V, 32GB, RTX3080, 2TB SX8200Pro, 2x16TB Ironwolf RAID0, Corsair HX1200, Thermaltake Overseer RX1, Samsung 4K curved 49" TV, 23" secondary, Mountain Everest Max

Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

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For the lulz I reproduced that config on that old setup, connected 2 drives, installed Win10 on one, made an NTFS partition on the other, then shrunk it, then started ubuntu install, selected manual for the partition layout, created a 128MB EFI partition at the beginning of the free space of the 2nd drive and the rest as ext4 mounted as /, and selecting the 2nd drive (the one ubuntu is on) for bootloader install.

 

All went normal and choosing which drive to boot from on the BIOS boot menu correctly boots the OS that's on that drive.

 

Interestingly with the old Radeon GPU the bootloader text is also corrupted (yet works and boots normally), swapping for my GT1030 it displays correctly so I guess the "screen is ramdomily filled with pixel of bootloader" is grub having issues with ancient GPUs...

 

IMG_20210517_145547.thumb.jpg.c59faf4c38ffdfe1a4273eea91908730.jpg

 

IMG_20210517_152755.thumb.jpg.d26986382a1acdf37688615f36f09e06.jpg

 

IMG_20210517_152649.thumb.jpg.9ea8cf7be44dc8718c9ec2bea1ffa222.jpg

 

2032439169_Screenshotfrom2021-05-1715-37-44.thumb.png.2952ca113513d3dda4dd259b53886cf3.png

 

1576096547_Screenshotfrom2021-05-1715-37-48.thumb.png.65b868045c55c2d5375e9fd6f1f7e1a9.png

 

Was a nice reminder of how awful running OSes from HDDs is too...

F@H
Desktop: i7-5960X 4.4GHz, Noctua NH-D14, ASUS Rampage V, 32GB, RTX3080, 2TB SX8200Pro, 2x16TB Ironwolf RAID0, Corsair HX1200, Thermaltake Overseer RX1, Samsung 4K curved 49" TV, 23" secondary, Mountain Everest Max

Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

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