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PC wont turn on first thing in the morning without unplugging when PSU is on

Hi I'm quite new to the forums and not that tech savvy myself, so here goes. I have a problem with turning on my PC. Every morning when I want to do some work, I turn my PC on and it won't give output to the keyboard or the monitor or the mouse, even though everything inside is lit up, including the green light on motherboard. This has been happening for three days now and I've found a temporary solution by turning it on (and if the computer wont give output), let it run for a bit, and then unplug the power cable, plug it on a different socket, then turning it on again, this way it'll turn on normally. I can probably guess that's not a really good solution in the long run and I don't want this computer to broke since I've got exams coming up in 2 weeks.

I've had this PC for years and the problem just comes up recently as when I got a new air conditioner for my room, and it's quite cold compared to my old air conditioner. The problem doesn't happen when I restart the system in the day, just the ones in the morning when I woke up and my room's still cold. Can the coldness of the AC impact the startup of my PC? Or is there another problem?

 

SPECS:
Asus H61M-K Motherboard

i5-3470 CPU, 3.20 GHz (4 CPUS)

8 GBs of RAM

NVIDIA GTX 1050 Ti

Windows 10 Pro 65-bit

400W Power Supply

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51 minutes ago, dudeN said:

Hi I'm quite new to the forums and not that tech savvy myself, so here goes. I have a problem with turning on my PC. Every morning when I want to do some work, I turn my PC on and it won't give output to the keyboard or the monitor or the mouse, even though everything inside is lit up, including the green light on motherboard. This has been happening for three days now and I've found a temporary solution by turning it on (and if the computer wont give output), let it run for a bit, and then unplug the power cable, plug it on a different socket, then turning it on again, this way it'll turn on normally. I can probably guess that's not a really good solution in the long run and I don't want this computer to broke since I've got exams coming up in 2 weeks.

I've had this PC for years and the problem just comes up recently as when I got a new air conditioner for my room, and it's quite cold compared to my old air conditioner. The problem doesn't happen when I restart the system in the day, just the ones in the morning when I woke up and my room's still cold. Can the coldness of the AC impact the startup of my PC? Or is there another problem?

 

SPECS:
Asus H61M-K Motherboard

i5-3470 CPU, 3.20 GHz (4 CPUS)

8 GBs of RAM

NVIDIA GTX 1050 Ti

Windows 10 Pro 65-bit

400W Power Supply

Sounds like a household electrical issue with overloaded wiring maybe?   The air con bespeaks that anyway.  An air conditioner is mostly just a complex electric pump with a thermostat on it so it cycles on and off. Electric motors turning on can produce really heavy momentary load that can cause problems for other things on the circuit.  Could also be a red herring though. The timing makes me suspicious though. 
 

 There is a difference between the way a machine behaves with a warm and cold boot.  A lot of computers don’t actually really turn off anymore even when they claim they do.  There are a bunch of different levels of sleep state that can make it appear a machine is off when it isn’t. Holding shift when hitting the screen power off is “more” off than but I don’t know if it actually powers down the machine or does a hibernate (in which a machine actually powers off but saves a bunch of stuff so it can come back on very quickly. 

Life is like a bowl of chocolates: there are all these little crinkly paper cups everywhere.

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2 hours ago, Bombastinator said:

Sounds like a household electrical issue with overloaded wiring maybe?   The air con bespeaks that anyway.  An air conditioner is mostly just a complex electric pump with a thermostat on it so it cycles on and off. Electric motors turning on can produce really heavy momentary load that can cause problems for other things on the circuit.  Could also be a red herring though. The timing makes me suspicious though. 
 

 There is a difference between the way a machine behaves with a warm and cold boot.  A lot of computers don’t actually really turn off anymore even when they claim they do.  There are a bunch of different levels of sleep state that can make it appear a machine is off when it isn’t. Holding shift when hitting the screen power off is “more” off than but I don’t know if it actually powers down the machine or does a hibernate (in which a machine actually powers off but saves a bunch of stuff so it can come back on very quickly. 

I don't know if it's an electrical issue or not but it's fine whenever I turn it on at night (when the AC's on) or in the day right after I do the plug and unplug thing. On the other hand I'm also not sure whether if it's a problem with the PC not shutting down completely, in my experience, the light's are off and it's not in hibernate/sleep since if I click on the keyboard/mouse it doesn't turn on. I haven't holding shift though, will it work though? even if my keyboard and mouse don't lit up?

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Are you unplugging it while it's running?

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So first thing in the morning, I turn it on.

 

If it doesn't give output to my monitor, keyboard, and mouse, as in it doesn't lit up, then I unplug the power cable to the computer.

 

Right after that, I plug the power cable into another different power socket.

 

and for the past few days, this is the only way that I know of that can get it working properly

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If all you're doing is alternating sockets back and forth, it probably isn't electrical, unless you swap back to the same socket every time for some reason.

 

When none of your peripherals are detected, it usually means something is bricked in the IO and gets resolved when a new boot cycle occurs - I'm just not sure why it has that issue after each shutdown. Seeing as you're forced to manually shut it down with the power button after that first boot, it might have something with your normal shutdowns failing to recognize your devices. By "normal" shutdowns, I mean that simply pressing Shut Down does not fully clear out your system's memory like a Restart would, meaning that some data persist through the sleep cycle to make startup times faster. If the component that manages your IO is misbehaving during this process, then it would make sense that your initial boot has the problem; Using the power button acts as a full shutdown like Restart does, which cleans the memory entirely and allows the IO to recognize your stuff again on the following boot.

 

The only thing I can think of right now to attempt to fix this is to do a fresh install of Windows to effectively format everything to its normal state (hopefully). You would need to offload everything on said drive - just the unique files of course - to something else like a flash USB.

Gigabyte B550M DS3H     AMD Ryzen 5 3600     AMD Wraith Stealth     2x8GB G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600 C16     500GB Western Digital WD_Black SN750     Cooler Master MasterBox NR600 w/o ODD     upHere T3SYC3-6     Rosewill Glacier Series 500W     PNY XLR8 GeForce GTX 1660 Super

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5 hours ago, Forleb said:

If all you're doing is alternating sockets back and forth, it probably isn't electrical, unless you swap back to the same socket every time for some reason.

 

When none of your peripherals are detected, it usually means something is bricked in the IO and gets resolved when a new boot cycle occurs - I'm just not sure why it has that issue after each shutdown. Seeing as you're forced to manually shut it down with the power button after that first boot, it might have something with your normal shutdowns failing to recognize your devices. By "normal" shutdowns, I mean that simply pressing Shut Down does not fully clear out your system's memory like a Restart would, meaning that some data persist through the sleep cycle to make startup times faster. If the component that manages your IO is misbehaving during this process, then it would make sense that your initial boot has the problem; Using the power button acts as a full shutdown like Restart does, which cleans the memory entirely and allows the IO to recognize your stuff again on the following boot.

 

The only thing I can think of right now to attempt to fix this is to do a fresh install of Windows to effectively format everything to its normal state (hopefully). You would need to offload everything on said drive - just the unique files of course - to something else like a flash USB.

Wait what about using the power button for a full shutdown? Will it work?

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3 hours ago, dudeN said:

Wait what about using the power button for a full shutdown? Will it work?

Actually yeah I overthought that pretty hard LOL

 

Try shutting it down using the power button consistently & lmk what happens...

Gigabyte B550M DS3H     AMD Ryzen 5 3600     AMD Wraith Stealth     2x8GB G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600 C16     500GB Western Digital WD_Black SN750     Cooler Master MasterBox NR600 w/o ODD     upHere T3SYC3-6     Rosewill Glacier Series 500W     PNY XLR8 GeForce GTX 1660 Super

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3 hours ago, dudeN said:

Wait what about using the power button for a full shutdown? Will it work?

In theory.  It may not be the default action though.  You may have to set it as such. This may be what the “shift”+ shutdown is about.

Life is like a bowl of chocolates: there are all these little crinkly paper cups everywhere.

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