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What is the best solution

Hi. I recently got a new, but used, 2-in-1 computer that does not include wifi. Additionally, my computer is too far away from my router in order to connect it directly to the router. So at first I got a wifi adapter to fix the problem, but realized it was too slow for my zoom meetings. So, I got a wifi extender and connected to the computer via Ethernet. I was wondering if I made a good decision to use the wifi extender or if I should have bought something else and if so, what are the cons to the wifi extender

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WiFi extenders/repeaters generally aren't very good and are often used incorrectly, making them worse. 

 

To get the most out of them, you want to put them between the device with poor WiFi and the access point (in this case, your router). Most people tend to put it right next to the device that's getting a poor WiFi signal, but all this will do is boost the poor signal so it doesn't actually improve much. 

 

So first thing I'd try is to move the extender to a place that gets decent signal between your PC and the router and then connect to it via WiFi, or if space/distance allows, connect it via a cable. 

 

The proper solution to poor WiFi signal is to buy a dedicated access point, which is then connected to the network via an ethernet cable and provides a WiFi signal for devices to connect to. You can use multiple and position them in different places to get a good coverage over the whole area you need covering. Obviously, the main issue for most is getting the ethernet cables from the network (a switch, the router etc) to the access point. 

 

A solution you could look into is powerline, which come in pairs that plug into electrical sockets and use the wiring there to connect. So on one end you connect a powerline adapter to your router and the other adapter you connect to your PC. Powerline can be a bit hit and miss and really depends on things like the quality of the wiring, the distance of the wiring, interference etc. Sometimes it works very well and sometimes it won't work at all if the two sockets you're using are on a different circuit for example. 

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26 minutes ago, Oshino Shinobu said:

WiFi extenders/repeaters generally aren't very good and are often used incorrectly, making them worse. 

 

To get the most out of them, you want to put them between the device with poor WiFi and the access point (in this case, your router). Most people tend to put it right next to the device that's getting a poor WiFi signal, but all this will do is boost the poor signal so it doesn't actually improve much. 

 

So first thing I'd try is to move the extender to a place that gets decent signal between your PC and the router and then connect to it via WiFi, or if space/distance allows, connect it via a cable. 

 

The proper solution to poor WiFi signal is to buy a dedicated access point, which is then connected to the network via an ethernet cable and provides a WiFi signal for devices to connect to. You can use multiple and position them in different places to get a good coverage over the whole area you need covering. Obviously, the main issue for most is getting the ethernet cables from the network (a switch, the router etc) to the access point. 

 

A solution you could look into is powerline, which come in pairs that plug into electrical sockets and use the wiring there to connect. So on one end you connect a powerline adapter to your router and the other adapter you connect to your PC. Powerline can be a bit hit and miss and really depends on things like the quality of the wiring, the distance of the wiring, interference etc. Sometimes it works very well and sometimes it won't work at all if the two sockets you're using are on a different circuit for example. 

Honestly I have found that powerline adapters when they work are probably the best solution. Basically get the benefits that come with ethernet without actually having to run a long ethernet run. Most of the time I have gotten the full bandwidth through them with basically zero packet loss. Obviously everyone's wiring is different so sometimes it won't work so well but when it does its basically equal to ethernet. 

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5 hours ago, Marcpc said:

Hi. I recently got a new, but used, 2-in-1 computer that does not include wifi. Additionally, my computer is too far away from my router in order to connect it directly to the router. So at first I got a wifi adapter to fix the problem, but realized it was too slow for my zoom meetings. So, I got a wifi extender and connected to the computer via Ethernet. I was wondering if I made a good decision to use the wifi extender or if I should have bought something else and if so, what are the cons to the wifi extender

Personally, I would never use a wireless extender or range booster. I’ve played with powerline adapters in the past enough to know that too many stars have to perfectly align for them to work properly. However, if this is all you can do given distance limitations or inability to run ethernet, then be prepared to live with the shortcomings.

 

If what you got is working fine for what you need it to do, then there’s no reason for buyer’s remorse. 

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12 hours ago, Marcpc said:

Hi. I recently got a new, but used, 2-in-1 computer that does not include wifi. Additionally, my computer is too far away from my router in order to connect it directly to the router. So at first I got a wifi adapter to fix the problem, but realized it was too slow for my zoom meetings. So, I got a wifi extender and connected to the computer via Ethernet. I was wondering if I made a good decision to use the wifi extender or if I should have bought something else and if so, what are the cons to the wifi extender

An option no one seemed to suggest are Moca adapters. In many homes especially in the US are wired for coax for Cable TV. These wires can be used for Network. Moca adapters can do speed of around 1 Gbps, especially with the newer Moca standards. Moca is heavily used by cable providers to do whole home DVR, so its a proven standard. The issue for Moca is the adapters are expensive. Your also limited to 16 adapters on a network, but for most that should be an issue. 

 

A pair of bonded Moca 2.0 adapters were $160 the last I checked. You also need a Moca filter if the same lines are used for cable/internet service from a cable provider. Not sure where prices are sitting now but its something to check out. 

I just want to sit back and watch the world burn. 

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