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Air Conditioning Unit and Gaming PC in the same breaker circuit

Is it safe to run a portalble air conditioning unit (115V 9A) and a gaming pc on the same circuit breaker, 15A max, 120V outlets.

System specs:

   EVGA RTX 2070 Super Black, undervolted to 0.9V, 190W sustained and 213.4W spike board power draw while running Unigine Heaven(Extreme preset, changed to 1080p) according to GPU-Z

   AMD Ryzen 5 3600, undervolted to 1.25V 3.9/3.85GHz, I'm fine with trying to underclock to 1.1V, if needed

   MSI B450 Gaming Plus Max

   EVGA 700BR 80+ Bronze Power Supply

   4 120mm fans, 1 140mm fan, and a Wraith Stealth cooler

   2 2.5" 1TB Seagate Barracuda Hybrid drives

   1 500GB WD Blue NVMe M.2 Drive

 

other things plugged into the wall, in the same room:

   1 27" 1080p 144hz and 1 21.5" 1080p 60hz Monitor

    a desk fan rated at 120V 0.3A

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I would not do that--every time the AC condenser turns on, there's a large quick spike in power consumption.  It will mean a mini brownout for other equipment on the same circuit.  Your AC might also be a powerful one, you did not say what it is.

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34 minutes ago, Quartz11 said:

I would not do that--every time the AC condenser turns on, there's a large quick spike in power consumption.  It will mean a mini brownout for other equipment on the same circuit.  Your AC might also be a powerful one, you did not say what it is.

What specs of the ac is relevant? In the back it says its 8400BTU/H, I don't know what else to say about it. Searching the model number doesn't give results unfortunately. But its a Kenmore 8400 BTU Portable Air Conditioner.

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The more powerful an AC unit, the more start-up current it will use every time the compressor starts to work to do the cooling.  The temporary spike current can be somewhere like 2-6 times its normal rated amp rating, from what I've read.  This temporary power usage spike will cause a brownout for other equipment on the same circuit, and it can last up to a few seconds.  If you have lamps plugged into that circuit, you will see them briefly dimming.

 

I just wouldn't plug in delicate electronics like your expensive computer into the same circuit.  

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P.S.: I don't know enough about small AC compressor units' inrush current: your particular AC might be fairly efficient and only have 2-3 times its rated operating current as peak (inrush) current.  Here's a general article about Inrush Current:   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inrush_current

 

If your AC unit is rated at 8.2 A:  https://www.kenmore.com/products/kenmore-77086-8-000-btu-portable-air-conditioner/ , your AC could be very temporarily drawing 16.4 A or even higher, and then once the compressor motor shuts off, there's a corresponding voltage spike.

 

 

 

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If it’s your own home, I’d invest in an electrician to add a new 15-20A circuit breaker for the AC using the closest outlet to the window.  Using extension cords with an AC is not recommended as a fire risk (if you must use one temporarily, at least get a high quality 10-12 AWG one).

 

If you are renting, you could ask your landlord for the same.  Or invest in a high quality UPS, but probably the always-on kind.  Hopefully someone more knowledgeable can chime in about those.

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