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Maybe Building Your Own PC is a BAD Idea

PC Secret Shopper returns - with a twist. In this episode, Agent Sarah investigates the experience of building a computer herself with the help of PCPartPicker to determine whether it's better to buy a pre-built PC, or DIY.

 

 

 

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But look how much fun she's having

My System: i9-10900KF 5.1-5.3ghz @ 1.365v // Corsair iCUE H150i Elite Capellix // Gigabyte Z590 Aorus Elite AX // 32GB (4x8) Crucial Ballistix Elite DDR4 4000/CL18 // ASUS RTX 3080 TUF OC // Corsair 275R Airflow // Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 850w //1TB ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro/1TB Samsung 860 EVO/2TB Seagate 7200RPM Hard Drive // Displays: LG Ultrafear 27GL83A-B/Lenovo L24Q-30/Lenovo L24Q-30 // Razer Black Widow TE Chroma // Razer Viper Ultimate // Corsair H70 Gaming Headset

 

Wife's System: i7-8700 // Arctic Freezer 33 // Gigabyte Z390M Gaming // 32GB (4x8) Corsair Vengeance LED DDR4 3200 // XFX Radeon 5700 XT RAW II // NZXT S340 // Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 850w // 1TB ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro/1TB Samsung 860 EVO/4TB Western Digital HDD // Displays: AOC AGON AG241QX/ASUS VG248QEASUS VP248Q // Corsair K68 Mechanical Keyboard // Logitech G602 // LG BDRW // NexStar 5.25" USB 3 Enclosure

 

TV Gamer: i7-8700k 5.0ghz All-core delidded @1.375v // Deepcool Gamerstorm Assassin III // Gigabyte Aorus Z370 Gaming 5 // 32GB (4x8) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 // Sapphire Radeon RX Vega 64 // Corsair 275R Airflow // Intel 660P 1TB NVME M.2 SSD/4TB Western Digital Blue // Display: 50" Westinghouse 1080p // Rii Wireless Mini Keyboard w/Touchpad/Xbox One Controllers

 

TV Gamer 2: Intel i3-10100 // ASRock H410M-HDV/M.2 // 16GB (2x8) DDR4 T-Force Vulcan 2666 // XFX RX 580 8GB XXX Edition // Rosewill FBM-X2 // Gigabyte P750GM // 480GB PNY CS1311 SSD/2TB Seagate HDD // Display: LG 50" 4k TV // Rii Wireless Mini Keyboard w/Touchpad/Xbox One Controllers Donated.

 

Son's System: i5-9400 // Cryorig H7 Quad Lumi // ASRock Z370 Extreme 4 // 16GB (2x8) GeIL Potenza DDR 3200 //ASUS RX 570 4GB // NZXT S340 Black // Seasonic S12II 620w Bronze // 525GB Crucial MX300/1TB WD SN550 // Display: ACER Nitro VG240Y/ PBiip / Dell P2417H // Eagletech KG010 Mechanical Keyboard // Logitech G203

 

Daughter's System: i3-8350k // Cooler Master i71c // MSI H310M Pro VDH-Plus // 8GB (2x4) Leven DDR4 2666 (2400) // Zotac GTX 1060 3GB Mini // DarkFlash Micro ATX White // Corsair CX550 // 480GB PNY CS1311 SSD/2TB Seagate HDD // Display: ASUS VG245H // Redragon TKL Mechanic Keyboard + Mouser

 

Retired: Ryzen 5 1600 // Gigabyte B450 Aorus M

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Shake!

Shake!

Shake it all out!

Shake them parts and see if they fall out!

 

😄

Good video overall

Current Network Layout:

Current Build Log/PC:

Prior Build Log/PC:

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Not sure I agree with the conclusion.  

 

The best way to get into building your own PC is to start with a pre built ... then upgrade the parts as time goes on.  

Say you buy a standard HP pre built with a Ryzen 4000 APU  and one expansion slot.  This gives you a known working state to start from.  Then over time you acquire a dGPU when the price is reasonable.  Then you get a Ryzen 5950X when they are more available.  

The whole time you have a working computer, and if you break one of the parts you get you have a working state you can return to.   The hard part of building your own PC right now is the utter impossibility of finding a dGPU at a reasonable price AND the lack of an available and up to date APU.  

 

PLUS if you do break something most manufacturers will restore it to the working state it was when when they sold it to you.  At least that was my experience. 

 

First thing I did that resembled "building" a PC was adding a "blazing fast" 2400 bps Modem to my Tandy 1000 RL so I could use PCLink (AOL before it was AOL) CompuServe, Prodigy, then the internet before the World Wide Web. (They aren't identically the same thing you know).   Second thing was 4-5 years latter on a Tandy sensation 2 upgrading the Intel 486 SX to  AMD  AM5x86 or AM6x86 processor back when they had the same socket and heat sinks were either passive or not needed at all. 

After that experience I was able to buy a bare bones PC and slap together my next computer and put Linux on it around the turn of the century. 

TLDR buy a pre built learn how to take it apart and put it together and have it still work, learn how to add things to it.  Then putting a computer together will be a snap.  You'll also retain the knowledge longer. 

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2 minutes ago, Uttamattamakin said:

Not sure I agree with the conclusion.  

 

The best way to get into building your own PC is to start with a pre built ... then upgrade the parts as time goes on.  

Say you buy a standard HP pre built with a Ryzen 4000 APU  and one expansion slot.  This gives you a known working state to start from.  Then over time you acquire a dGPU when the price is reasonable.  Then you get a Ryzen 5950X when they are more available.  

The whole time you have a working computer, and if you break one of the parts you get you have a working state you can return to.   The hard part of building your own PC right now is the utter impossibility of finding a dGPU at a reasonable price AND the lack of an available and up to date APU.  

 

PLUS if you do break something most manufacturers will restore it to the working state it was when when they sold it to you.  At least that was my experience. 

 

First thing I did that resembled "building" a PC was adding a "blazing fast" 2400 bps Modem to my Tandy 1000 RL so I could use PCLink (AOL before it was AOL) CompuServe, Prodigy, then the internet before the World Wide Web. (They aren't identically the same thing you know).   Second thing was 4-5 years latter on a Tandy sensation 2 upgrading the Intel 486 SX to  AMD  AM5x86 or AM6x86 processor back when they had the same socket and heat sinks were either passive or not needed at all. 

After that experience I was able to buy a bare bones PC and slap together my next computer and put Linux on it around the turn of the century. 

TLDR buy a pre built learn how to take it apart and put it together and have it still work, learn how to add things to it.  Then putting a computer together will be a snap.  You'll also retain the knowledge longer. 

 

I'd like to say I disagree with this, but for most people they started with the family PC which was a prebuilt.


For me, when I finally became really interested in PC's (we had used Tandy 1000, 486SX2, but I wasn't that into the hardware aspect at the time) it was an IBM Aptiva with an AMD K6-2 with integrated Rage Pro graphics. While I didn't specifically upgrade that, the fact it was so difficult to upgrade was the catalyst for me becoming interested in assembling my own PC (which ended up being a Pentium III 450mhz on a 440BX board).

 

So yeah, most of us start out with a prebuilt family PC I would say. The model and spec just shifts over time, I think. Older people will be Apple IIs or something, and younger people will be newer stuff.

My System: i9-10900KF 5.1-5.3ghz @ 1.365v // Corsair iCUE H150i Elite Capellix // Gigabyte Z590 Aorus Elite AX // 32GB (4x8) Crucial Ballistix Elite DDR4 4000/CL18 // ASUS RTX 3080 TUF OC // Corsair 275R Airflow // Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 850w //1TB ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro/1TB Samsung 860 EVO/2TB Seagate 7200RPM Hard Drive // Displays: LG Ultrafear 27GL83A-B/Lenovo L24Q-30/Lenovo L24Q-30 // Razer Black Widow TE Chroma // Razer Viper Ultimate // Corsair H70 Gaming Headset

 

Wife's System: i7-8700 // Arctic Freezer 33 // Gigabyte Z390M Gaming // 32GB (4x8) Corsair Vengeance LED DDR4 3200 // XFX Radeon 5700 XT RAW II // NZXT S340 // Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 850w // 1TB ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro/1TB Samsung 860 EVO/4TB Western Digital HDD // Displays: AOC AGON AG241QX/ASUS VG248QEASUS VP248Q // Corsair K68 Mechanical Keyboard // Logitech G602 // LG BDRW // NexStar 5.25" USB 3 Enclosure

 

TV Gamer: i7-8700k 5.0ghz All-core delidded @1.375v // Deepcool Gamerstorm Assassin III // Gigabyte Aorus Z370 Gaming 5 // 32GB (4x8) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 // Sapphire Radeon RX Vega 64 // Corsair 275R Airflow // Intel 660P 1TB NVME M.2 SSD/4TB Western Digital Blue // Display: 50" Westinghouse 1080p // Rii Wireless Mini Keyboard w/Touchpad/Xbox One Controllers

 

TV Gamer 2: Intel i3-10100 // ASRock H410M-HDV/M.2 // 16GB (2x8) DDR4 T-Force Vulcan 2666 // XFX RX 580 8GB XXX Edition // Rosewill FBM-X2 // Gigabyte P750GM // 480GB PNY CS1311 SSD/2TB Seagate HDD // Display: LG 50" 4k TV // Rii Wireless Mini Keyboard w/Touchpad/Xbox One Controllers Donated.

 

Son's System: i5-9400 // Cryorig H7 Quad Lumi // ASRock Z370 Extreme 4 // 16GB (2x8) GeIL Potenza DDR 3200 //ASUS RX 570 4GB // NZXT S340 Black // Seasonic S12II 620w Bronze // 525GB Crucial MX300/1TB WD SN550 // Display: ACER Nitro VG240Y/ PBiip / Dell P2417H // Eagletech KG010 Mechanical Keyboard // Logitech G203

 

Daughter's System: i3-8350k // Cooler Master i71c // MSI H310M Pro VDH-Plus // 8GB (2x4) Leven DDR4 2666 (2400) // Zotac GTX 1060 3GB Mini // DarkFlash Micro ATX White // Corsair CX550 // 480GB PNY CS1311 SSD/2TB Seagate HDD // Display: ASUS VG245H // Redragon TKL Mechanic Keyboard + Mouser

 

Retired: Ryzen 5 1600 // Gigabyte B450 Aorus M

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The problem with pre-built is they don't necessarily use a PSU or motherboard ideal for upgrading.  Some use the absolute bottom of the barrel parts where adding a high-end CPU or GPU would be a terrible idea.

 

Its a pretty expensive way to go about it if you end up having to replace all the expensive parts of the PC.

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the faces and reactions of linus where pricless. let the meme army began!

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1 hour ago, Uttamattamakin said:

Not sure I agree with the conclusion.  

 

The best way to get into building your own PC is to start with a pre built ... then upgrade the parts as time goes on.  

Say you buy a standard HP pre built with a Ryzen 4000 APU  and one expansion slot.  This gives you a known working state to start from.  Then over time you acquire a dGPU when the price is reasonable.  Then you get a Ryzen 5950X when they are more available.  

The whole time you have a working computer, and if you break one of the parts you get you have a working state you can return to.   The hard part of building your own PC right now is the utter impossibility of finding a dGPU at a reasonable price AND the lack of an available and up to date APU.  

 

PLUS if you do break something most manufacturers will restore it to the working state it was when when they sold it to you.  At least that was my experience. 

 

First thing I did that resembled "building" a PC was adding a "blazing fast" 2400 bps Modem to my Tandy 1000 RL so I could use PCLink (AOL before it was AOL) CompuServe, Prodigy, then the internet before the World Wide Web. (They aren't identically the same thing you know).   Second thing was 4-5 years latter on a Tandy sensation 2 upgrading the Intel 486 SX to  AMD  AM5x86 or AM6x86 processor back when they had the same socket and heat sinks were either passive or not needed at all. 

After that experience I was able to buy a bare bones PC and slap together my next computer and put Linux on it around the turn of the century. 

TLDR buy a pre built learn how to take it apart and put it together and have it still work, learn how to add things to it.  Then putting a computer together will be a snap.  You'll also retain the knowledge longer. 

So, that doesn't work with Dell. There are probably a few other pre-built sellers that won't work with as well, and it's hard to know if you can/can't upgrade something without knowing what to check ahead of time, which a newbie wouldn't. Dell, for example, has a custom power supply (in terms of both form factor and cable-out) which cannot be upgraded. The motherboard expects these custom pinouts, so replacing the PSU or MOBO requires replacing both. The cases are typically not ATX compatible, since Dell also makes the mobo just slightly-off spec.

 

"Basically, don't buy Dell." Yea, while they are the only company I know does this, they are not the only company that actually does this.

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Give Sarah a $5000 Intel extreme tech upgrade! @LinusTech @James

  • My system specs
  • View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Edition, No PSU, XL-ATX, Black, Full Tower Case
  • ROG MAXIMUS XI EXTREME, Intel Z390 Chipset, LGA 1151, HDMI, E-ATX Motherboard
  • Core™ i9-9900K 8-Core 3.6 - 5.0GHz Turbo, LGA 1151, 95W TDP, Processor
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It's worth mentioning that /r/buildapc also maintains a Discord if people need help making part lists (as opposed to the Subreddit where, as Linus said, you're expected to have one already made - even if it's a poor one that needs some tweaks).

The Potato Box:

AMD 5950X

EVGA K|NGP|N 2080Ti

128GB 3600 CL16 RAM

 

The Scrapyard Warrior:

AMD 3950x

EVGA FTW3 2080Ti

64GB 3200 CL16 RAM

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"Because your motherboard doesn't effect performance"

 

Ight Imma Head Out | Know Your Meme

"And I'll be damned if I let myself trip from a lesser man's ledge"

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Watching someone that doesn't have much PC building experience is at the best of times scary, at the worst just face palm worthy.
 

I usually guide people through their first PC build, as to ensure that people don't slaughter their own rig before it sees its first boot....
Wiggling add in cards is a bad move.... Turning things up side down is as well. Differentiating between PCIe power cables and EPS ones is something that has for a long time made me think that EPS cables should have been the only standard for both motherboards and GPUs.... (This almost became a thing in the server space.)

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56 minutes ago, asquirrel said:

So, that doesn't work with Dell. There are probably a few other pre-built sellers that won't work with as well, and it's hard to know if you can/can't upgrade something without knowing what to check ahead of time, which a newbie wouldn't. Dell, for example, has a custom power supply (in terms of both form factor and cable-out) which cannot be upgraded. The motherboard expects these custom pinouts, so replacing the PSU or MOBO requires replacing both. The cases are typically not ATX compatible, since Dell also makes the mobo just slightly-off spec.

 

"Basically, don't buy Dell." Yea, while they are the only company I know does this, they are not the only company that actually does this.

Where in what I said did I mention upgrading the motherboard?  Changing motherboards is such a major change that one is no longer upgrading the computer they have but building a new computer.  

A newbie needs to think smaller.  Upgrading the process or storage or add in cards.  

Just to get used to the mechanics of working with computer components.    

 

For example the "sucky single channel 8 GB Dimm" HP will put in is better for most people since when the find the "problem" they can just go to best buy and pick up another dimm.  In the process they install it, and gain a bit of confidence that they can do that sort of thing. 

TL DR. People need to  learn to count (using a computer).  Then learn Algebra (upgrading a computer).  Then learn calculus (building a computer). 

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2 hours ago, Mister Woof said:

 

I'd like to say I disagree with this, but for most people they started with the family PC which was a prebuilt.

........

 

So yeah, most of us start out with a prebuilt family PC I would say. The model and spec just shifts over time, I think. Older people will be Apple IIs or something, and younger people will be newer stuff.

AMD K6-2  Yeah those were the days.  That was about when AMD felt enough juice to have a different socket than intel.  (That might have been when Intel had that edge card method for their processors. 

 

This is all I am saying.  Not saying they are better or ideal or what have you.  Pre builts are available, relatively inexpensive (especially when a dGPU cost almost as much as a whole computer even at MSRP at the high end, and safer to learn on.  At least you know you have a working computer with parts that are compatible. 

2 hours ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

The problem with pre-built is they don't necessarily use a PSU or motherboard ideal for upgrading.  Some use the absolute bottom of the barrel parts where adding a high-end CPU or GPU would be a terrible idea.

 

Its a pretty expensive way to go about it if you end up having to replace all the expensive parts of the PC.

This is true sometimes.   That said I think of a recent video made by LTT . 

 

Quite a few things that enthusiast think are absolutely necessary are total nonsense.  

But what do they know right? 

For most people in most use cases they really only need one expansion slot, even for a use case like running Linux passing a DGPU to a windows VM and running linux off the IGP or APU. 

For most people even high end gaming does not need the ... frankly... work station grade hardware people brag about among gamers. 

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That ended up great. Better then when my friend was swapping gphicscard and then he brouke up his PCIe.

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1 hour ago, BaidDSB said:

Can anyone find out the thread sarah posted here? wanna see what the replies were

 

EDIT: here it is

 

 

Man.. how did I not see this!!

 

Big shoutout to the forum users that helped! 

PSU Tier List  || Graphics Card Tier List || Community Standards

 

Resonance Cascade Specifications: 

 

CPU: Intel i9-10980XE 18C/36T  ||  CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 Air Cooler ||  RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 64GB(8x8GB) DDR4-3600 CL18  ||  Mobo: MSI X299 Gaming Pro Carbon AC  ||  SSD: Samsung 970 EVO 1TB M.2-2280 Boot Drive/Some Games)  ||  HDD: 2X Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB(Game Drive)  ||  GPU: MSI RTX 2080 GAMING X TRIO  ||  PSU: EVGA P2 1600W  ||  Case: Corsair 900D  ||  Mouse: Logitech G502 Hero SE RGB  ||  Keyboard: Logitech G513 Carbon RGB with GX Blue Clicky Switches  ||  Mouse Pad: MAINGEAR ASSIST XL ||  Monitor: ASUS TUF Gaming VG34VQL1B 34" 

 

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Sarah laughing is soooo infectuous. 🤣

 

+1 on Sarah doing a tutorial on stuff she does know her way around, like CAD, etc. After all, she's proven herself pretty smart, has a great personality onscreen, is already a fav with the audience (gender plays no small part in this, let's not deny the truth for "political correctness" here!) and is entertaining to watch too.

 

Anyway, nice job done to Ms Butt, even managed to get her boss to cringe almost constantly, without actually wrecking parts by dropping them like he so often does 😛

"You don't need eyes to see, you need vision"

 

(Faithless, 'Reverence' from the 1996 Reverence album)

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1 hour ago, Uttamattamakin said:

Where in what I said did I mention upgrading the motherboard?  Changing motherboards is such a major change that one is no longer upgrading the computer they have but building a new computer.  

A newbie needs to think smaller.  Upgrading the process or storage or add in cards.  

Just to get used to the mechanics of working with computer components.    

 

For example the "sucky single channel 8 GB Dimm" HP will put in is better for most people since when the find the "problem" they can just go to best buy and pick up another dimm.  In the process they install it, and gain a bit of confidence that they can do that sort of thing. 

TL DR. People need to  learn to count (using a computer).  Then learn Algebra (upgrading a computer).  Then learn calculus (building a computer). 

You fail to understand my point. So you buy a new Dell and decide to upgrade the GPU. You bought it with a 1660 Ti, but you want to put a 3080 in. So you go to do that and...discover that the PSU only has a single 4-pin PCI-E power connector "You mean 6!" No. I mean 4, because Dell custom. "OK, no problem, let me change out the power supply."

 

So you buy a new PSU. You go to plug in the 24-pin connector only to find that Dell does not use a 24-pin connector, so you can't plug in your new PSU to the motherboard. So now you need a new motherboard. You get the motherboard and discover the case mounting points don't match any ATX spec (matx, itx, atx, etc). So now you need a new case.

 

Well at least the RAM will work! And then you find out Dell uses 192 pin RAM instead of the standard 240 pin modules. See where this is going? This is not hypothetical. This is real. Even something as simple as a hard drive may be impossible due to there being no extra SATA power connectors, assuming there were any in the system t o begin with.

 

The problem is how integrated all their 'custom' stuff is. That's the point of what I'm saying. And as for the BIOS on board that motherboard, well, it may not contain the code needed to boot higher speed ram. DDR-3600? Unsupported, even though the CPU *should* be able to do it. Well...ok, but what if I wanna go 3200, surely that will work? Sometimes not; sometimes the only speed RAM that works is the RAM that came with the motherboard.

 

If you plan to upgrade a pre-built, you can do it, but you MUST buy from a vendor that uses the same parts we could all buy off pcpartpicker. If you try to do it with Dell and possibly other assemblers, you will have a really bad time trying to do even simple upgrades.

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9 minutes ago, asquirrel said:

You fail to understand my point. So you buy a new Dell and decide to upgrade the GPU. You bought it with a 1660 Ti, but you want to put a 3080 in. So you go to do that and...discover that the PSU only has a single 4-pin PCI-E power connector "You mean 6!" No. I mean 4, because Dell custom. "OK, no problem, let me change out the power supply."

So you don't buy a 3080.   

 

Problem solved. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ThatOneDunce said:

From what I've seen, they usually stick an mATX board in there, so you're already losing possible expansion and features right off the bat. Doesn't seem quite worth it to me, even if there's always the possibility of a socket change which could limit your upgrade path. 

See the recent LTT video which discusses the fact that the vast majority of people don't actually need all of those bells and whistles. 

 

I get that many here are PC building aficionado's, you love building PC and watching others do so.  The building the tinkering the upgrading are all and end unto themselves. 

To many here it is acceptable to break parts and RMA each of them separately.  

 

To many here it is preferable to eschew a 3400G and get to work NOW in favor of having a computer without either their dream 5950X OR their 3090.... then to play GTA V or Rocket league on it. 

 

To many here pre builds are pure useless garbage. 

 

To most humans though they are the one way in this year, and probably the next to guarantee a working system that they can build on.    Something to start with and learn from. 

Edited by Uttamattamakin
To sound like an old person as I keep it real with the youngins.
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What was the point of this video? To show that people can build a pc while COMPLETELY ignoring any provided instructions? They were there for a reason, use them.

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I think this is the first PC build video I've watched where I was screaming internally the whole time.

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