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[Raspberry Pi 4 Model B] 4 or 8 GB RAM model?

Hello everyone!

 

I am looking to buy a Raspberry Pi 4 Model B to host some websites with a couple of friends and to generally learn Linux and so on. However, I am having a hard time deciding between the 4GB and 8GB RAM versions. Are 8GB really necessary to host a web server with a wiki or should 4GB be enough?

 

Also, is a heatsink necessary for this use case or should I be fine letting it run without one?

 

Thanks in advance!

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600Motherboard: MSI B450 Tomahawk Max GPU: ASUS Strix RX5600XT O6G ═ RAM: HyperX Fury 2x8GB 2666MHz CL16 ═ PSU: be quiet! Pure Power 11 500W ═ Cooler: be quiet! Pure Rock 2 ═ SSD: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB M.2 SSD ═ HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB ═ Case: Lian Li Lancool II Mesh RGB

 

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i havent personally run into a usecase where i've needed more than 4GB (honestly.. never really used much more than 1GB..) where the cpu core wasnt a horrible bottleneck to the experience either way.

 

as for the heatsink.. it *can* run without a heatsink, but you really should put one on. stuff like the 'ice tower' is complete ridiculous overkill, but a little chipset heatsink will help a lot with keeping the temperatures in check.

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I'm not certain, but my spidy senses tell me that 4gb might even be overkill. As for heatsink, I've read that the pi 4 really does need a heatsink. A small one and a little fan should be more than enough, or just a large passive sink.

ASU

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2 minutes ago, manikyath said:

i havent personally run into a usecase where i've needed more than 4GB (honestly.. never really used much more than 1GB..) where the cpu core wasnt a horrible bottleneck to the experience either way.

 

as for the heatsink.. it *can* run without a heatsink, but you really should put one on. stuff like the 'ice tower' is complete ridiculous overkill, but a little chipset heatsink will help a lot with keeping the temperatures in check.

Thanks for the reply! Just as a point of reference, what has been the use case with the most load on the Raspberry Pi if you don't mind me asking?

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600Motherboard: MSI B450 Tomahawk Max GPU: ASUS Strix RX5600XT O6G ═ RAM: HyperX Fury 2x8GB 2666MHz CL16 ═ PSU: be quiet! Pure Power 11 500W ═ Cooler: be quiet! Pure Rock 2 ═ SSD: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB M.2 SSD ═ HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB ═ Case: Lian Li Lancool II Mesh RGB

 

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I haven't used a Pi in a long time but I am with the other people here where you're going to run into CPU bottlenecks long before you run out of RAM.

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2 minutes ago, Kerbalino said:

Thanks for the reply! Just as a point of reference, what has been the use case with the most load on the Raspberry Pi if you don't mind me asking?

difficult to say.. but i've defenately had my fair share of fun with heavy workloads on raspberry pi..

- emulating n64 is just about on the edge of what most of the pi's can handle. pi4 is the first one that didnt need an OC to run without skipping frames

- compiling software is great fun, literally hours of waiting with the cpu pinned...

- the few 'propper' 3D games you can compile for the pi defenately run.. and defenately run like arse 😛

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1 minute ago, manikyath said:

difficult to say.. but i've defenately had my fair share of fun with heavy workloads on raspberry pi..

- emulating n64 is just about on the edge of what most of the pi's can handle. pi4 is the first one that didnt need an OC to run without skipping frames

- compiling software is great fun, literally hours of waiting with the cpu pinned...

- the few 'propper' 3D games you can compile for the pi defenately run.. and defenately run like arse

Damn, that really is a buttload of stuff hehe. Thank you for telling me though! 8GB really must be overkill if you managed to do that stuff with just 4GB. I will probably go for a 4GB one then.

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600Motherboard: MSI B450 Tomahawk Max GPU: ASUS Strix RX5600XT O6G ═ RAM: HyperX Fury 2x8GB 2666MHz CL16 ═ PSU: be quiet! Pure Power 11 500W ═ Cooler: be quiet! Pure Rock 2 ═ SSD: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB M.2 SSD ═ HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB ═ Case: Lian Li Lancool II Mesh RGB

 

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I have a 4gb, and have never used all the ram unless I’m trying to watch YouTube on it (something I never do). Honestly, I wish I bought the 2gb, as I use my raspi for emulation. The CPU will bottleneck you before you will be able to use 8gb of RAM (and maybe 4 also). I think the 4 would be a better option unless you have $20 to blow.

My system: Core I7 10700k, 32 gb Trident Z RGB ram@3200mhz, EVGA GTX 970 SSC (will upgrade), NZXT N7 Z490 motherboard (Black, Samsung 980 1TB SSD, NZXT C850 PSU, Hyper 212 EVO RGB cooler, Corsair 4000D airflow case. 

 

 

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Honestly 2 is plenty.

14 hours ago, Kerbalino said:

Also, is a heatsink necessary for this use case

No but it doesn't hurt and most kits include one.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

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Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

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A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

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From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

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A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

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Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

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Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

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A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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