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Is it worth editing photo's/videos in 10-Bit if most content is view on 8-Bit displays

Hello!

 

I recently bought and am comparing the Dell S2721QS 4k monitor (10-Bit) and ASUS PRO ART DISPLAY PA278QV (8-Bit)

 

Both are great displays but I've struggled to find online why its a benefit to edit photos or videos on a 10-Bit display when something like 95% of content is viewed on 8-Bit phones, monitors, Tv's, etc. The 10-Bit display is clearly more vibrant but I'm worried about editing something to a 10 Bit display and it looking more wash-out on a 8-Bit display. I know there's an advantage to printing but If I was a professional photographer would I just edit in 10 bit anyway?

 

Curious if this a normal occurrence.

 

Thanks, and have a great day! 

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Color accuracy is more important then 10bit. If you have bad coverage on a 10bit, it's much worse than a great on a 8bit.

I am still TechWizardThatNeedsHelp, just less of a mouthfull.

ALWAYS REMEMBER: FULL SPECS IN A TROUBLESHOOTING QUESTION AND TO NOT BE A DICK IF SOMEONE CANT FIGURE OUT THE ISSUE

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35 minutes ago, Matthewerm said:

The 10-Bit display is clearly more vibrant but I'm worried about editing something to a 10 Bit display and it looking more wash-out on a 8-Bit display.

That's not how bit depth works. More bit depth just means finer gradiations between colors, which has nothing to do with gamut size.

 

If the same content looks different on two different displays (ignoring differences in black level and viewing angles), either:

  1. The content has colors that cannot be properly rendered by one of the displays (beyond the gamut of the hardware or profile), or
  2. Much more likely, you have not calibrated and profiled both displays.

When you create content, you can't control how it will be viewed. You just have to make sure that it looks as intended on a properly calibrated display, and that the majority of your audience will be able to view your content as intended.

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