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reliable haswell stresstest applications?

hey guys

im having my 4770K from launch date and overclocked this thing on the first day of use :)

its on 4.2ghz and 4.2ghz uncore with a core voltage of 1.18v and cpu ring of  1.220v 

the ring voltage is that high because it gets unstable if i dont add voltage to it

 

i used aida64 for stresstesting and it got 65c on the cpu and cores so thats great

so that was great

 

now i wanted to see if my temperatures and stability are ok 

in aida64 its all ok 65c 

 

in the newer prime95 28.4 the cpu gets 95c in 1 sec 

 

what should i do which to trust 

 

and why do these chips get so freaking hot omg

 

its all fully watercooled custom loop with car radiator 

 

can someone please help me out

 

cheers

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AIDA64. Prime I heard is bad for Haswell chips.

Haswell is known for being hot. Something about it not being soldered or something. delidding can help temperature out.

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1. Don't use prime95 as it requests for additional voltage.

2. Aida64 should suffice. Others are available, but occt is the only one I can remember.

But leave aida to test at 100% for multiple hours and see if all is good.

Stock coolers - The sound of bare minimum

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Try Intel extreme tuning utility.

I don't always have time to study, but when I do, I don't.

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hey guys

im having my 4770K from launch date and overclocked this thing on the first day of use :)

can someone please help me out

 

cheers

 

as with the AIDA64, Intel Extreme Utility and OCCT seem to do well with the haswell platform.

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There are no reliable stresstests lol.. You should first test your stability in a game for some extended periods and then go ahead try prime. You don't want to have your cpu running unstable in prime.

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there is a revised prime95 for haswell that is out there. And prime itself doesnt ask for more voltage but when that certain instruction set is used haswell uses more. Which is why OCCT has a option to enable/disable it.

The intel one is safest one and I believe AIDA64 is as well.

Intel XTU uses Prime95 itself to stress test!

really you sure?

There are no reliable stresstests lol.. You should first test your stability in a game for some extended periods and then go ahead try prime. You don't want to have your cpu running unstable in prime.

That is the point of running prime to see if it in unstable. it will stress your PC far harder than any game.

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I often see people saying not to use Prime95 on Haswell. Why exactly is this?

"PSU brands are meaningless, look up the OEM."

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Look at the help file in XTU.

Benchmarking allows you to gauge the performance of your processor. Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility uses Prime95 as the benchmarking engine. Since Prime95 returns a time as a result, Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility uses a simple formula to convert the time into a score. The higher the score, the better your system is performing.

More details from HWBot: http://hwbot.org/newsflash/2164_just_one_of_those_days___der8auer_clears_core_i7_3770k_xtuprime95_at_6600_mhz

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That is the point of running prime to see if it in unstable. it will stress your PC far harder than any game.

An unstable cpu would bsod, if youre only gaming with your system and you never saw a bsod then its stable. If the cpu cant correct his error you get a bsod or your app crashes, upping the vcore to a point where it doesnt bsod anymore your system wont bsod. There shouldn't be any performance loss, an unstable oc at the same frequency as a stable OC performs identical (hint IBT gflops). At the moment the cpu makes an error your test stops.

Also people are thinking that load matters a fuck to make your pc crash, well no -> I could pass 24hours small fft's but crashing every hour at idle. Why didnt it crash? Because small fft's singles the cpu out, so its not the only test you should do. Or you had issues that you could pass blend 24h but you keep crashing at idle: http://www.overclock.net/t/1120291/solving-fixing-bsod-124-on-sandybridge-read-op-first/0_100

Why I'm saying that you should test your overclock with a game or any other short stability runs before you go do 12hours of prime95 is here: http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1019610-NEW-MMO-Champion-CPU-Overclocking-Leaderboards?p=24989385&viewfull=1#post24989385

Unless you want to have your chip degrading faster, go ahead.

I'm not a fan by myself of stresstests really, I'd be only using stresstests for artifact scanners (and validate with benchmarks if there arent any performance loss due to ECC) on the gpu with evga oc scanner and the core is just being tested with games.

 

 

I often see people saying not to use Prime95 on Haswell. Why exactly is this?

Because it overvolts the vcore for some reasons which apparently can be disabled. It might overvolt a bit but thats not the real deal, see above when prime can be bad.

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An unstable cpu would bsod, if youre only gaming with your system and you never saw a bsod then its stable. If the cpu cant correct his error you get a bsod or your app crashes, upping the vcore to a point where it doesnt bsod anymore your system wont bsod. There shouldn't be any performance loss, an unstable oc at the same frequency as a stable OC performs identical (hint IBT gflops). At the moment the cpu makes an error your test stops.

Also people are thinking that load matters a fuck to make your pc crash, well no -> I could pass 24hours small fft's but crashing every hour at idle. Why didnt it crash? Because small fft's singles the cpu out, so its not the only test you should do. Or you had issues that you could pass blend 24h but you keep crashing at idle: http://www.overclock.net/t/1120291/solving-fixing-bsod-124-on-sandybridge-read-op-first/0_100

Why I'm saying that you should test your overclock with a game or any other short stability runs before you go do 12hours of prime95 is here: http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1019610-NEW-MMO-Champion-CPU-Overclocking-Leaderboards?p=24989385&viewfull=1#post24989385

Unless you want to have your chip degrading faster, go ahead.

I'm not a fan by myself of stresstests really, I'd be only using stresstests for artifact scanners (and validate with benchmarks if there arent any performance loss due to ECC) on the gpu with evga oc scanner and the core is just being tested with games.

 

 

Because it overvolts the vcore for some reasons which apparently can be disabled. It might overvolt a bit but thats not the real deal, see above when prime can be bad.

Because Prime95 is more stressful than a game. A game does not put your cpu under full load. Other things yo ucould do are encode, render, and fold. Thing is if your doing the first two you dont want them to fail if your OC is bad. And yes when you IC is unstable you will get blue screens or you PC may just crash completely.

I have never had a chip with a 24hr stable OC crash at idle or any issues in games. the first like relates to idle states which has nothing to do with the OC being stable. The other thing is that I dont run a stress test while O cant monitor it for at least the first ~6-8 hours as usualy if it makes it though that itll make it the rest of the time. That would be as that on link says setting you car up to dyno and whatever happens, happens. Also if yo uthat worried about killing your cpu get the intel coverage for OCing its really not that much money.

Prime95 does not overvolt the core the instruction set that it uses does. That is why other programs had the issue and there is a version for haswell out now.

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Because Prime95 is more stressful than a game. A game does not put your cpu under full load. Other things yo ucould do are encode, render, and fold. Thing is if your doing the first two you dont want them to fail if your OC is bad. And yes when you IC is unstable you will get blue screens or you PC may just crash completely.

I have never had a chip with a 24hr stable OC crash at idle or any issues in games. the first like relates to idle states which has nothing to do with the OC being stable. The other thing is that I dont run a stress test while O cant monitor it for at least the first ~6-8 hours as usualy if it makes it though that itll make it the rest of the time. That would be as that on link says setting you car up to dyno and whatever happens, happens. Also if yo uthat worried about killing your cpu get the intel coverage for OCing its really not that much money.

Prime95 does not overvolt the core the instruction set that it uses does. That is why other programs had the issue and there is a version for haswell out now.

The cpu doesnt have to be at full load to crash. A game will just crash after 30-40 mins where as prime would do that in 10mins so no you don't need the cpu at full load.

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The cpu doesnt have to be at full load to crash. A game will just crash after 30-40 mins where as prime would do that in 10mins so no you don't need the cpu at full load.

That depends on what its crashing from and no it doesnt have do be at full load but it sure does help. I have has OCs that were stable while gaming bust as soon as I started encoding they crashed.

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AIDA64. Prime I heard is bad for Haswell chips.

Haswell is known for being hot. Something about it not being soldered or something. delidding can help temperature out.

 

Well part of it is the on-die VRM, and yes the heatspreader not being soldered to it, but if I'm not mistaken intel hasn't done that since their Core 2 series chips.

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