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Can I de-tune my i9-10850K temporarily for heat purposes?

Catdog
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Hey there! Got a i9-10850K and well by my rookie error I didn't consider how taxing it would be on cooling. So I've ordered an EK-AIO 360 and a Lian-Li Air case but I'm waiting for them to arrive, in the mean-time I want to still play the games I did with my i7-6700K with the same Silverstone 120 AIO cooler no problems - namely GTA V (FiveM). I just tried playing for a bit then and the CPU got VERY toasty 90C+ with all fans on full. 

Is there a utility I could use to de-tune the CPU to help with heat? Preferably with like some presets for that? I'm not worried about max power right now, because the 6700K played GTA V fine, I got the 10850K namely for more taxing games like ArmA 3. 
I have the Phantom Gaming utility which has fan options and CPU OC options but idk what settings to turn down and by how much to get a steady underclock. 


Cheers.
System
AsRock PG Velocita Z490 

i9-10850K 

GTX 1080 

G.Skill 4000MHz 4x8GB

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Well I mean of course, Normally if I'm having thermal problems with a cpu I would evenly underclock each cpu core. Ex: Each cpu core underclocked by 100mhz or .1ghz. It really depends on how much your thermal throttling and a lot of trial and error.

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Your motherboard is probably is set to use Multi Core Enhancement(MCE) by default.

Switching it off may be all you need. 

Look for a YouTube video how to do it.

RIG#1 CPU: AMD, R 9 5900X| Motherboard: X570 AORUS Master | RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32GB DDR4 3200 | GPU: EVGA FTW3 ULTRA  RTX 3090 ti | PSU: EVGA 1000 G+ | Case: Lian Li O11 Dynamic | Cooler: EK 360mm AIO | SSD#1: Corsair MP600 1TB | SSD#2: Crucial MX500 2.5" 2TB | Monitor: LG 55" 4k B9 OLED TV

 

RIG#2 CPU: Intel i9 11900k | Motherboard: Z590 AORUS Master | RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32GB DDR4 3600 | GPU: EVGA FTW3 ULTRA  RTX 3090 ti | PSU: EVGA 1300 G+ | Case: Lian Li O11 Dynamic EVO | Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 | SSD#1: SSD#1: Corsair MP600 1TB | SSD#2: Crucial MX300 2.5" 1TB | Monitor: LG 55" 4k B9 OLED TV

 

RIG#3 CPU: Intel i9 10900kf | Motherboard: Z490 AORUS Master | RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32GB DDR4 4000 | GPU: MSI Gaming X Trio 3090 | PSU: EVGA 1000 G+ | Case: Lian Li O11 Dynamic | Cooler: EK 360mm AIO | SSD#1: Crucial P1 1TB | SSD#2: Crucial MX500 2.5" 1TB | Monitor: LG 55" 4k C1 OLED TV

 

RIG#4 CPU: Intel i9 9900k | Motherboard: AORUS Z390 Ultra | RAM: Ripjaws V Series 32GB DDR4 3200 | GPU: EVGA XC3 Ultra 3080 ti  | PSU: EVGA 1000 G+ | Case: Cooler Master H500 | Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 | SSD: Crucial P2 1TB  | SSD#2: Samsung 860 QVO 2TB | Monitor: LG 38" 3840 X 1600 75hz monitor.

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6 minutes ago, jones177 said:

Your motherboard is probably is set to use Multi Core Enhancement(MCE) by default.

Switching it off may be all you need. 

Look for a YouTube video how to do it.

Just checked! It was already disabled. 
I’ve just turned off Turbo Boost. 

 

I’m unsure how to underclock each individual core. I see. BLCK Freq (currently Auto) but I think I saw 100MHz in the Phantom utility) 

FCLK Freq 800MHz.

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Is this what I should be touching for changing each core? Ie change ratio cores 1 from 2 to 1?

598A19E6-7A45-4B25-87DB-92BBFF4327A2.jpeg

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Just changed turbo ratio 1 to 45 from 52 to set the max CPU to 4.5GHz will try going even lower. Hasn’t done anything to idle temps but maybe it’ll play cooler. 

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@CatdogYou can use ThrottleStop to run your 10850K at whatever speed you like from 800 MHz to 5000 MHz and beyond.

 

https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/throttlestop-9-2-9.276365/

 

i4tnKgl.jpg

 

You can tune your 10 core CPU so it sucks power similar to a low end laptop. You can set up multiple profiles and easily switch profiles without having to reboot. You can also get ThrottleStop to switch profiles automatically so your computer will slow down based on CPU or GPU temperature. 

 

What is your voltage set to? If you are using default voltage, this can add a lot of unnecessary heat.

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2 hours ago, unclewebb said:

@CatdogYou can use ThrottleStop to run your 10850K at whatever speed you like from 800 MHz to 5000 MHz and beyond.

 

https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/throttlestop-9-2-9.276365/

 

i4tnKgl.jpg

 

You can tune your 10 core CPU so it sucks power similar to a low end laptop. You can set up multiple profiles and easily switch profiles without having to reboot. You can also get ThrottleStop to switch profiles automatically so your computer will slow down based on CPU or GPU temperature. 

 

What is your voltage set to? If you are using default voltage, this can add a lot of unnecessary heat.

Just running default voltages cause I didn’t really know what to set it to. 

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54 minutes ago, Catdog said:

Just running default voltages

Here is an example of why it is not a good idea to be using default voltage on Intel's 10 core CPUs.

 

Default Voltage

273.0W  

92°C

kMDcHtI.png

 

Core Offset -100 mV

215.3W

77°C

16mpATg.png

 

On an Asus board with CPU SVID Support enabled in the BIOS, using ThrottleStop for a quick -100 mV core offset undervolt was good for a 58 W drop in power consumption while running Cinebench R20 and a 15°C drop in peak temperature. The Intel default voltage is always too high.

 

The results are well worth the time it takes to adjust this. Use the TS Bench to test for stability.

If it displays any errors, your undervolt is not stable and your CPU will need more voltage.

image.png.c44ded32b5d084e5b17efab542ba8519.png

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9 hours ago, unclewebb said:

Here is an example of why it is not a good idea to be using default voltage on Intel's 10 core CPUs.

 

Default Voltage

273.0W  

92°C

kMDcHtI.png

 

Core Offset -100 mV

215.3W

77°C

16mpATg.png

 

On an Asus board with CPU SVID Support enabled in the BIOS, using ThrottleStop for a quick -100 mV core offset undervolt was good for a 58 W drop in power consumption while running Cinebench R20 and a 15°C drop in peak temperature. The Intel default voltage is always too high.

 

The results are well worth the time it takes to adjust this. Use the TS Bench to test for stability.

If it displays any errors, your undervolt is not stable and your CPU will need more voltage.

image.png.c44ded32b5d084e5b17efab542ba8519.png

Wow! That’s about the temps I got after setting clock to 4500MHz total in bios 

maybe I’ll try reversing that and go -100mV and see how it compares 

then I’ll try both 4500MHz and -100mV. That’s crazy, when I touched voltage before I was very worried at even -15mV, I wasn’t sure how far I could go before having to change the clock and everything together, I really wasn’t sure how to get the balance. Good to see some hard evidence in your examples, 10/10. 
 

So to clarify, going -100mV you kept the same performance, clock speed, and everything? Have you tried any lower voltage than that and if so how did it affect it? 

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1 hour ago, Catdog said:

you kept the same performance, clock speed, and everything?

Both screenshots show in the background that Cinebench was just finishing the final column. The C0% reported is 100.0% which means all 20 threads are fully loaded and they are all running at 5000 MHz. Reducing voltage does not reduce performance. It reduces heat. You get the same Cinebench scores either way.

 

Intel produces processors on an assembly line by the thousands. They do not have time to set the voltage to exactly what the CPU needs. They always add on some extra voltage so when they put a CPU in a box for sale, they know that it will be 100% reliable for the next 5 or 10 years.

 

1 hour ago, Catdog said:

Have you tried any lower voltage than that

I am not sure if Cinebench does any error checking. I think it can run reliably at -125 mV or -150 mV. Maybe I will go try another run just to see. The TS Bench will report errors if I try to use those voltages. That makes the TS Bench a good quick test to get your voltages in the ball park. I set it to 960M and 16 Threads. If you load all 20 threads, the computer is less responsive because it is fully loaded. A partial load test is also more realistic. The tasks will bounce around from core to core which is what normally happens. 

 

If you want to try running a 45 multiplier, open the FIVR window, click on the Turbo Groups button and enter 45 for the Ratio Limit. Simple to do and you can change the CPU speed while a benchmark is running. No need to reboot each time.

 

image.png.168daabbd6df92c7c624c6cb8e284499.png

 

Here's a run at 5000 MHz with a -125 mV undervolt. Another drop in power consumption. The house is warmer this morning so only a small drop in temps.

 

image.png.246e89b80d8966559b2d5913a5c5f37d.png

 

Final run at a core offset of -150 mV. A total drop of 80W and 20°C compared to default voltage. Not bad at all.

 

image.png.addce9724c0ce049268e01dd0ce408d6.png

 

At an offset of -150 mV. Within a couple of seconds of pushing the Start button, the TS Bench is immediately showing errors. 

That means this undervolt is too much for regular use. Cinebench stable does not mean too much.

 

image.png.27e005fb9861a69f46827e9cc4be67bb.png

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  • 1 year later...
On 12/29/2020 at 1:14 AM, unclewebb said:

Here is an example of why it is not a good idea to be using default voltage on Intel's 10 core CPUs.

 

Default Voltage

273.0W  

92°C

kMDcHtI.png

 

Core Offset -100 mV

215.3W

77°C

16mpATg.png

 

On an Asus board with CPU SVID Support enabled in the BIOS, using ThrottleStop for a quick -100 mV core offset undervolt was good for a 58 W drop in power consumption while running Cinebench R20 and a 15°C drop in peak temperature. The Intel default voltage is always too high.

 

The results are well worth the time it takes to adjust this. Use the TS Bench to test for stability.

If it displays any errors, your undervolt is not stable and your CPU will need more voltage.

image.png.c44ded32b5d084e5b17efab542ba8519.png

Sorry to reply to something so old, but would you mind taking a look at my post (I will link it at the bottom of this reply) and see if this is something I should look at doing to sort out my issues. Thanks. 

 

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