Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

any valid (cheap or free) alternative to matlab?

gnu octave seems to be pretty popular, but whatever thing I do search for (just for having some general idea on what it can do and what not) there are 0 result about gnu octave, but there are always for Matlab

 

I don't care about things like compatible syntax to matlab or gui things alike, because I will need to learn it from 0 anyways

 

I just need something that can simulate pretty much everything

 

but also I don't have thousands to spend, by so I was looking for some cheap/free suite.. any suggestions/reccomandation?

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my knowledge they're both about the same fundamentally (outside of syntax)

 

GNU should be able to do everything matlab does.

 

-Moved to Programming-

Community Standards || Tech News Posting Guidelines

---======================================================================---

CPU: R5 3600 || GPU: GTX 1080 || Memory: 16GB @ 3200 || Cooler: Noctua D15 || PSU: 750W EVGA G2 || Case: Define C

Link to post
Share on other sites

GNU Octave is your best option, as long as you don't need the toolboxes.

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites

This and this should provide all the information you need regarding what it can do.

Main Rig:-

Ryzen 7 3800X | Asus ROG Strix X570-F Gaming | 16GB Team Group Dark Pro 3600Mhz | Corsair MP600 1TB PCIe Gen 4 | Sapphire 5700 XT Pulse | Corsair H115i Platinum | WD Black 1TB | WD Green 4TB | EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650W | Asus TUF GT501 | Samsung C27HG70 1440p 144hz HDR FreeSync 2 | Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS |

 

Server:-

Intel NUC running Server 2019 + Synology DSM218+ with 2 x 4TB Toshiba NAS Ready HDDs (RAID0)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Slottr said:

To my knowledge they're both about the same fundamentally (outside of syntax)

 

GNU should be able to do everything matlab does.

 

-Moved to Programming-

dunno about that..

 

matlab seems to have a cfd simulator, while octave not, same goes with robotics..

 

I would like to have something that could do fast simulation without having to build up the whole thing by scratch, and lower to the minimal the user control by so reducing the possibilities of errors

 

well.. frankly I don't know of what I'm talking about, I just need something that can simulate pretty much everything fastly

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wolfram Mathematica is only about $300 (or so) now. That's about 1/3 the cost of MatLab, at around $800.

I don't know if it makes it cheap enough, but the main competitor to MatLab is Wolfram, and in some ways, it's much better than MatLab. In other ways it's not as good. 

Alternatively, there are many programming languages that are free, and both MatLab and Mathematica are written in one of those free-to-use languages. 
MatLab uses C/C++ and Fortran, while Mathematica uses C/C++. Both use Java for their IDEs/ interfaces.

What exactly are you trying to simulate? I ask because you may not have to build the whole thing up by scratch: Most languages will have freely-available third party libraries to do a lot of the things that MatLab/Mathematica can do.

ENCRYPTION IS NOT A CRIME

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Lii said:

can simulate pretty much everything fastly

FWIW, matlab is really slow haha

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Slottr said:

GNU should be able to do everything matlab does.

GNU is an operating system, not a mathematics-related software package.

GNU Octave is a part of the GNU operating system though.

 

3 hours ago, Lii said:

I just need something that can simulate pretty much everything

Try Maxima.

Write in C.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

GNU is an operating system, not a mathematics-related software package.

GNU Octave is a part of the GNU operating system though.

I'm aware, just lazy typing lol

Community Standards || Tech News Posting Guidelines

---======================================================================---

CPU: R5 3600 || GPU: GTX 1080 || Memory: 16GB @ 3200 || Cooler: Noctua D15 || PSU: 750W EVGA G2 || Case: Define C

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, straight_stewie said:

Wolfram Mathematica is only about $300 (or so) now. That's about 1/3 the cost of MatLab, at around $800.

I don't know if it makes it cheap enough, but the main competitor to MatLab is Wolfram, and in some ways, it's much better than MatLab. In other ways it's not as good. 

Alternatively, there are many programming languages that are free, and both MatLab and Mathematica are written in one of those free-to-use languages. 
MatLab uses C/C++ and Fortran, while Mathematica uses C/C++. Both use Java for their IDEs/ interfaces.

What exactly are you trying to simulate? I ask because you may not have to build the whole thing up by scratch: Most languages will have freely-available third party libraries to do a lot of the things that MatLab/Mathematica can do.

well, frankly I was looking for something with a lot of gui, and less about of scripting.. maybe something like comsol? but less pricey..

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lii said:

well, frankly I was looking for something with a lot of gui, and less about of scripting.. maybe something like comsol? but less pricey..

Scratch? Haha

Don’t take any of my posts seriously. 

 

LTT Fan Fiction:

 

PC game list: 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If whatever you need it for is connected with robotics:

Webots
Gazebo Robot Simulator
V-REP
Marilou Robotics Studio

Link to post
Share on other sites

gnu octave?

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5950x 
Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix x570-f Gaming
RAM: Adata XPG DDR4 D60G 64GB (16*4) 3600MHZ RAM 
PSU: Seasonic PRIME 1000
Mon: Philips 346B
GPU: Asus Turbo Series RTX 2080Ti
Sound: Bose 700 Headphones 
Case: Asus TUF GT501
Storage: 2x Samsung Evo 980 Pro 1TB (Each, total of 2TB) in RAID 0
Cooling: Asus ROG LC 240mm and a bunch of Noctua fans

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, JacobFW said:

I'd recommend learning Python.  Has some amazing numerical libraries these days, and since it's a general purpose language, you have a lot more flexibility in terms of what you can do.

Also true for Go and Common Lisp - which I'd warmly recommend over Python which is slow and confusing in my opinion.

Yet, not everyone wants to learn how to write a tool just to use a tool.

Write in C.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

Also true for Go and Common Lisp - which I'd warmly recommend over Python which is slow and confusing in my opinion.

To each their own.

8 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

Yet, not everyone wants to learn how to write a tool just to use a tool.

Very true, but at the same time if you are going to have to learn a new language (especially from scratch like Lii said), then I would argue it's worth is to add just a little bit of additional work in learning, to give you such a wider range of programs you can make.  And hell if he wants, there are a lot of tutorials out there for Python and other languages that get straight to the point, and will teach you how to do specific things in those languages, rather than taking a tutorial that teaches Python as a general purpose language.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

Also true for Go and Common Lisp - which I'd warmly recommend over Python which is slow and confusing in my opinion.

Yet, not everyone wants to learn how to write a tool just to use a tool.

Python's community is way larger than those mentioned when it comes to maths and statistics. If one were asking about a nice language to build CI/CD pipelines or system tools, then Go would be a way better choice. Python is also way faster than Lisp (and may even beat Go in some scenarios) since the most used math libraries are actually built in cpp with python wrappers.

 

One needs to know when to use the proper tool for the job instead of seeing everything as a nail.

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, igormp said:

Python is also way faster than Lisp

A myth that's easy to debunk:

https://github.com/drujensen/fib

 

Cython can be faster than Lisp, admittedly - Python transpiled into C. But that only means that C is faster than Lisp...

And depending on how much you know about compiler optimization, even that is wrong:

https://lbolla.wordpress.com/2010/12/05/sbcl-quicker-than-c/

Write in C.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

A myth that's easy to debunk:

https://github.com/drujensen/fib

 

Cython can be faster than Lisp, admittedly - Python transpiled into C. But that only means that C is faster than Lisp...

And depending on how much you know about compiler optimization, even that is wrong:

https://lbolla.wordpress.com/2010/12/05/sbcl-quicker-than-c/

Nice nitpicking when you ignored the entire fact that I mentioned the libraries (such as numpy and scipy) which are widely used, faster and have a great community. Nobody in their sane mind would actually do a project with bare python.

 

And if you want to go all smartass, even luaJIT is faster than C due to how the linker works on linux.

 

Also, you're going totally off-topic. OP wanted a replacement for Matlab. The usual contenders are Octave if you want something really similar, or python if you're familiar with the language and are ok with doing everything from scratch.

 

If he wanted something fast, he wouldn't be asking for matlab to begin with, we would've gone with fortran already.

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, igormp said:

the libraries (such as numpy and scipy) which are widely used, faster

Dare you to show me any benchmark where NumPy and SciPy outperform SBCL's math libraries.

 

3 minutes ago, igormp said:

Also, you're going totally off-topic. OP wanted a replacement for Matlab.

So the whole discussion about Python was irrelevant in the first place.

Write in C.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

Dare you to show me any benchmark where NumPy and SciPy outperform SBCL's math libraries.

 

The included math stuff is really lacking in features when compared to numpy or scipy (same goes for python, that's why you go for libraries), and there's no point in comparing against with stuff such as lisplab, since it also makes use of BLAS under the hood, meaning that your hot path would perform basically the same.

 

10 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

So the whole discussion about Python was irrelevant in the first place.

The discussion you started? Sure, pretty irrelevant. That single python tip was quite useful since tons of engineers actually move from matlab to python due to how easy and faster it is.

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, igormp said:

The discussion you started?

Actually, @JacobFW did. Because the question was not which programming language to use, the question was which tool to use.

Write in C.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Personally, I would always choose Python. It is simply much more powerful compared to Matlab and Octave. However, if you are mainly interested in implementing algorithms for testing or understanding or plotting a function, you will do well with Octave. For Octave I have created a youtube channel that is especially for beginners:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHhpS8dROT70q9CFJlXwSEA

Many greetings

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2021 at 11:05 AM, mtk03 said:

It is simply much more powerful compared to Matlab and Octave.

??? where the hell did you get that fact from. Most Mathlab function are in C and some Fortran which are tenfolds faster than Python You can also use any C/C++/C# library if you want to code separately or you buy the module (which isn't cheap I admit) to convert the mathlab code to C++ or C#.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Franck said:

??? where the hell did you get that fact from. Most Mathlab function are in C and some Fortran which are tenfolds faster than Python You can also use any C/C++/C# library if you want to code separately or you buy the module (which isn't cheap I admit) to convert the mathlab code to C++ or C#.

He said powerful, not faster. With python you have way more freedom to do stuff, while with matlab you're usually stuck with needing a specific toolbox.

 

Most of python's math libraries are also written in C or Fortran anyway, so that point is also moot.

FX6300 @ 4.2GHz | Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 R2 | Hyper 212x | 3x 8GB + 1x 4GB @ 1600MHz | Gigabyte 2060 Super | Corsair CX650M | LG 43UK6520PSA
ASUS X550LN | i5 4210u | 12GB
Lenovo N23 Yoga

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×