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Unable to make USB device bootable

So I tried to use the Windows USB DVD Download Tool and turn my USB into a bootable drive. But this is what pops up at the end of the process;

 

image.png.56a0bd1871a4012eaba61929496b7f2c.png

 

I did some searching and apparently the issue comes from the fact I am running a 32bit version of Windows, and the version I'm trying to create a boot device for is 64bit. There were people talking about downloading bootsect (or something like that?) and provided links, but none of them work anymore. Could someone please help me with this?

 

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7 minutes ago, EasonIDontKnowAnything said:

So I tried to use the Windows USB DVD Download Tool and turn my USB into a bootable drive. But this is what pops up at the end of the process;

 

image.png.56a0bd1871a4012eaba61929496b7f2c.png

 

I did some searching and apparently the issue comes from the fact I am running a 32bit version of Windows, and the version I'm trying to create a boot device for is 64bit. There were people talking about downloading bootsect (or something like that?) and provided links, but none of them work anymore. Could someone please help me with this?

 

Where did you find that tool? Did you get it from here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/software-download/windows7

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5 minutes ago, EasonIDontKnowAnything said:

Yeah

 

No. But it was from a Microsoft website.

I would download the ISO from the website I linked, then use Rufus (https://rufus.ie/) to create the USB. Unless that program from Microsoft is defaulting to using your recommended system settings when creating the boot disk, there should be no reason why you can't make a 64-bit Windows installer on a 32-bit system. 

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11 hours ago, BlueChinchillaEatingDorito said:

I would download the ISO from the website I linked, then use Rufus (https://rufus.ie/) to create the USB. Unless that program from Microsoft is defaulting to using your recommended system settings when creating the boot disk, there should be no reason why you can't make a 64-bit Windows installer on a 32-bit system. 

I used Rufus to create the USB (it took a bloody long time). I restarted the computer and went into the boot menu and after that I selected the USB, but this is what I was met with; 

 

IMG20201203175154.jpg

 

I think the issue is that I selected UEFI for my "Target System" in Rufus. Can't believe I'll have to redo this whole thing. But I'll hold off until I get your input.

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8 hours ago, EasonIDontKnowAnything said:

I used Rufus to create the USB (it took a bloody long time). I restarted the computer and went into the boot menu and after that I selected the USB, but this is what I was met with; 

 

IMG20201203175154.jpg

 

I think the issue is that I selected UEFI for my "Target System" in Rufus. Can't believe I'll have to redo this whole thing. But I'll hold off until I get your input.

You should be able to just go into the BIOS setup and change your system to boot in UEFI mode if available and disable Secure Boot as Windows 7 will not take advantage of it. After that, the installer should boot up with no issue.

 

If your system does not support UEFI, then you'll need to recreate it using what you said, Legacy/BIOS as the target system in Rufus. 

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1 hour ago, BlueChinchillaEatingDorito said:

You should be able to just go into the BIOS setup and change your system to boot in UEFI mode if available and disable Secure Boot as Windows 7 will not take advantage of it. After that, the installer should boot up with no issue.

 

If your system does not support UEFI, then you'll need to recreate it using what you said, Legacy/BIOS as the target system in Rufus. 

Is there any functional difference in booting from UEFI as opposed to BIOS? What will changing my system boot to UEFI do?

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3 hours ago, EasonIDontKnowAnything said:

Is there any functional difference in booting from UEFI as opposed to BIOS? What will changing my system boot to UEFI do?

Not exactly. I believe the main ones was being able to utilize drives over 3+TB as well as some additional security measures. But not much else if you're using Windows 7. The security measures essentially were to combat old viruses that messed around with the BIOS. 

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7 hours ago, BlueChinchillaEatingDorito said:

Not exactly. I believe the main ones was being able to utilize drives over 3+TB as well as some additional security measures. But not much else if you're using Windows 7. The security measures essentially were to combat old viruses that messed around with the BIOS.

Hey, so new problem. Ive installed Windows but it doesn't recognise that I have an internet connection. The PC says it doesn't detect a network adapter, and that if I do have one I need to install the driver (can't do that because there is no internet connection). I also have the PC connected with ethernet.

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7 hours ago, BlueChinchillaEatingDorito said:

Not exactly. I believe the main ones was being able to utilize drives over 3+TB as well as some additional security measures. But not much else if you're using Windows 7. The security measures essentially were to combat old viruses that messed around with the BIOS. 

 

IMG20201204144559.jpg

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