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Nvidia Sold $175 Million Worth of GeForce RTX 30 GPUs To Crypto Miners

8 minutes ago, MageTank said:

I am still down to debate the moral conundrums of what people do with their hardware and wants vs needs, anything to get me through these longer stress tests.

Something something, counter argument, on guard.

image.jpeg.db78a47fca8202f45d926dd1ce1ebe8e.jpeg

 

Actually on topic comment, this single sale in regards to the topic post is less than 8% of Nvidia's quarterly revenue in their Gaming segment (Yes Nvidia calls it that in the reports) so odds are without this sale and all the GPU packages going in to gaming cards and being feed in to the retail chain would have been largely unnoticed. The overall demand is just that big of a problem, so big we don't actually know how big it is.

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4 minutes ago, leadeater said:

Something something, counter argument, on guard.

image.jpeg.db78a47fca8202f45d926dd1ce1ebe8e.jpeg

 

Actually on topic comment, this single sale in regards to the topic post is less than 8% of Nvidia's quarterly revenue in their Gaming segment (Yes Nvidia calls it that in the reports) so odds are without this sale and all the GPU packages going in to gaming cards and being feed in to the retail chain would have been largely unnoticed. The overall demand is just that big of a problem, so big we don't actually know how big it is.

I've been trying to speculate what has been driving the demand for this particular series of GPU's. I don't remember the 2000 series being this sought after, then again, most people are smart enough to not buy the first revision of a new technology. Is it because this is the mature revision of ray tracing? Is it due to the pandemic giving those working from home more time to game while technically on the clock? There has to be a quantifiable reason that the demand for GPU's this time around is eclipsing every previous launch, and I don't just mean from miners.

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On 1/2/2017 at 9:32 PM, MageTank said:

Sometimes, we all need a little inspiration.

 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, MageTank said:

I've been trying to speculate what has been driving the demand for this particular series of GPU's. I don't remember the 2000 series being this sought after, then again, most people are smart enough to not buy the first revision of a new technology. Is it because this is the mature revision of ray tracing? Is it due to the pandemic giving those working from home more time to game while technically on the clock? There has to be a quantifiable reason that the demand for GPU's this time around is eclipsing every previous launch, and I don't just mean from miners.

I think it's a collective of all you mentioned converging at the same time. You have people feeling that a GPU upgrade is now actually warranted, GTX 10 series was actually extremely successful but sales spread out much wider. Monitor technology has actually started to progress again last few years which is factoring in to people wanting to upgrade to now be able to drive that new purchase. Personally existing gamers I do not think are influenced that much at all by the pandemic, RTX 30 series just felt good enough people want it. However I do think a lot more people are getting in to gaming due to the pandemic so the market itself has grown.

 

So I think it's a combination of both GTX 900 series and GTX 10 series owners trying to purchase at the same time, those who do every second or so generation largely did not buy in to RTX 20 series, along with the market growing reasonably significantly and everyone looking to buy right now as there is nothing better to do.

 

Every recent GPU release has gotten higher demand each time, that's at least a consistent trend. But we can also look over at the CPU demand issue to know that the market as a whole is growing, even before Ryzen Intel was having CPU supply shortages.

 

Human observation is a fickle thing, we tend to notice problems and not notice things when they are not or are building up to one. I'll be very interested to see the next 2 quarterly reports from Nvidia and AMD, both for the GPU revenue and AMD for the CPU revenue. I think this will tell a very interesting and enlightening story. What I want to know, I'll certainly forget to check it, is GPU sales figures for GTX 10 series vs RTX 30 series once 30 series gets replaced. Only then will we know just how much bigger the demand/market actually was/is right now.

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8 hours ago, mwagen said:

So would you say that the guy with the newborn is entitled to the diapers? Diapers aren't a necessity, could use cloth like many do, and that's part of my point. Entitlement implies that an object or position has been earned in some way, so I just don't like the use of that word in a discussion on free market economies. 

Just to be clear, "entitlement" has nothing to do with earning, but solely to do with having the right to something. (e.g. Humans are entitled to Human Rights, there's no quest you must complete to earn them)

 

Re: diapers. Definitely a necessity. Cloth diapers sound ineffective/unsanitary. 🥴

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1 hour ago, MageTank said:

I want to remind everyone of a very real truth here. Gamers are not as important to these businesses as we like to make ourselves out to be. We represent a very small, very niche portion of their businesses. Granted, we are the loudest portion, and often drive their marketing for the average consumers, but the big money exists in markets most of us have little to no understanding of.

Until very recently gamers where the sole reason for the existence and development of GPUs (plus a bit of CAD designing). GPGPU is a very young field which would all not exist if it wasn't for gamers that drove GPUs to become as powerful as they are. Even now I wouldnt be so quick to jump to the conclusion that most money is made from non-gamers. Just because the fraction of 3080s and the like is tiny, lower-end GPUs that share the same architecture have insane volumes in all kinds of computing devices where they are mostly used for gaming, also don't forget the GPUs that are part of every console sold.

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12 minutes ago, Dracarris said:

Until very recently gamers where the sole reason for the existence and development of GPUs (plus a bit of CAD designing). GPGPU is a very young field which would all not exist if it wasn't for gamers that drove GPUs to become as powerful as they are. Even now I wouldnt be so quick to jump to the conclusion that most money is made from non-gamers. Just because the fraction of 3080s and the like is tiny, lower-end GPUs that share the same architecture have insane volumes in all kinds of computing devices where they are mostly used for gaming, also don't forget the GPUs that are part of every console sold.

Very true, and I am not arguing against this by any means. Gamers resulting in the existence of GPU's has little to do with modern day market share in terms of GPU's. Without even googling the numbers, I can say with the utmost confidence that Nvidia is making more money in their HPC, Cloud, Neural Networking, AI and automotive markets than what they currently are from just their gaming customers. Those contracts are worth billions in and of themselves just in the exchange of money, and the relationships forged from those business ventures are invaluable.

 

Businesses grow, and while it is commendable that most still continue to serve their original markets, many do move on to more profitable endeavors. It's still very worth it for AMD, Nvidia and Intel to compete for the attention and acclaim of gamers, because gamers (as I mentioned earlier) are often the loudest in this industry. They are the ones that make recommendations to their family members. They are free marketing. They are also frustratingly loyal. Anyone that has participated in any tech forum has likely witnessed their fair share of fan wars between Brand A and B, it's beyond comprehension. Catering just enough to the extent of keeping their loyalty is basically a surefire way to keep revenue coming in, while not wasting silicon or R&D resources while working on the next big thing.

 

In short, everything you just said in the paragraph that I quoted is absolutely right, but that doesn't mean things haven't changed from a market perspective. Our consumer technology are now the breadcrumbs/afterthought of the enterprise products that came before them. This isn't a bad thing though, it's pretty smart, lol.

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On 1/2/2017 at 9:32 PM, MageTank said:

Sometimes, we all need a little inspiration.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, leadeater said:

However I do think a lot more people are getting in to gaming due to the pandemic so the market itself has grown.

According to an article from npd.com, that is correct.

 

Quote

"Year-over-year growth for participation, time and money spent on gaming has been significant among less traditional gaming segments as well, notably adults over 45 years of age. Time spent gaming for those between the ages of 45 and 54 saw an increase of 59%, while dollar spend increased 76%. Gamers ages 55 to 64 increased time and money spent by 48% and 73%, respectively; and those 65 and older increased time and money spent on gaming by 45% and 29%, respectively.

 

For many consumers, this increased engagement with games is likely to be part of a general increase in digital activities and device usage with gamers also reporting increases in their online activities, including social media and streaming platform usage.

 

Although investment in the gaming category is up, overall time/money spent on other forms of entertainment for this audience is generally down. This is driven, for the most part, by COVID-19 restrictions, which have significantly impacted access to key categories like live events and dining out." -npd.com

 

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I don't wanna life anymore.........

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32 minutes ago, Nacht said:

I don't wanna life anymore.........

Yea you do.

Life is like a bowl of chocolates: there are all these little crinkly paper cups everywhere.

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On 11/30/2020 at 3:45 PM, Master Delta Chief said:

First of all, there's nothing that needs to be agreed upon. It's simple, mining needs to end, period. Your comparison has no relevance in this particular debate as those two are different things and circumstances. I know that capitalism is pretty much at fault here as the system allows it to happen, but that doesn't mean that because of that we can't put restrictions in place for scalpers. One of the reasons there is a market in place for scalpers is simply because consumers have no other choice but to buy from those types of people if stock in regular stores are empty or worse are at higher prices because of that. In order to prevent that from happening, governments should regulate stores to restrict sales of these solely towards the regular consumer by either putting a limit by how much can be sold or by other potential solutions that I can't come up with right now. 

 

And for the record, this isn't about entitlement whatsoever. I know the issues that I have mentioned go way beyond this original topic of the thread, but are related. 

Wowee zowee.

 

For one, mining applications (particularly blockchain) have already contributed far more to society than gaming ever has, and are continuing to contribute more than your ability to play Whinecraft at 16K ever will.

 

Two, you're advocating market controls on GPUs. Market controls are typically employed to make sure that, for example, gas isn't $20/gallon while a hurricane is approaching. They're there to make sure that everyone has a fair shot at essential items (and they kinda failed there...). They're not there to make sure that you can play Whinecraft at 16K instead of "your" GPU being sold to someone who's going to use it to combine its power with others to advance science, to fold, or to redefine currency. You know, someone who's going to better society with it?

 

If a retailer wants to put a limit on how many of a certain item can be bought by a certain person, go for it. I completely support retailers doing that. It is not, has never been, and never shall be the place of any government say, "NVIDIA, you can't sell RTX 3080s to 'scalpers' because Little Master Privilege wants to play Whinecraft in 16K, and he wants to play it now."

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1 hour ago, aisle9 said:

Wowee zowee.

 

For one, mining applications (particularly blockchain) have already contributed far more to society than gaming ever has, and are continuing to contribute more than your ability to play Whinecraft at 16K ever will.

 

Two, you're advocating market controls on GPUs. Market controls are typically employed to make sure that, for example, gas isn't $20/gallon while a hurricane is approaching. They're there to make sure that everyone has a fair shot at essential items (and they kinda failed there...). They're not there to make sure that you can play Whinecraft at 16K instead of "your" GPU being sold to someone who's going to use it to combine its power with others to advance science, to fold, or to redefine currency. You know, someone who's going to better society with it?

 

If a retailer wants to put a limit on how many of a certain item can be bought by a certain person, go for it. I completely support retailers doing that. It is not, has never been, and never shall be the place of any government say, "NVIDIA, you can't sell RTX 3080s to 'scalpers' because Little Master Privilege wants to play Whinecraft in 16K, and he wants to play it now."

It's funny that certain individuals like you seem to assume that I say gaming should gain priority over anything, but let me tell you, you're wrong. I am criticizing mining for different reasons unlike some in this thread that don't make a proper argument on as to why mining is a bad thing. Gaming isn't the sole importance on getting a GPU, there are many other applications that are pretty important. I will say though that gaming has a much larger influence than you might think, still that doesn't mean it should gain priority. 

 

Unfortunately as you and I know, retailers are reluctant to implement certain restrictions as it basically makes cash for them, hence why I mentioned a government should step in. Whether such control ever comes in place, only time will tell.  

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I think most people here are looking at this from a flawed angle.

 

Nvidia doesn't sell individual cards aside from FEs. They fulfill orders from third parties for GPUs, who then assemble the cards.

 

Let's say Nvidia gets an order from Asus, an order from Gigabyte, and an order from a boardmaker who specializes in mining. They can't just say to the mining mfr, "we don't like your style, so we won't fulfill your order so we can send all these GPUs to your competitors" without losing a lot of important industry ties. And a lot of gaming partners make mining cards as well, so they couldn't just say "all GPUs you sell must be marketed for gaming" in the contract-- AIB partners have left Nvidia in the past, and they wouldn't want to risk getting abandoned by their best customers. EVGA makes mining cards; imagine the number of people who would change sides in the GPU war if EVGA went AMD only like XFX did a few years ago.

 

Is this move bad for their rep among gamers? Yes, but you all want the cards anyway, so they don't care. Is it kinda disingenuous? Yea, but again, you all want the cards anyway. Will it matter long term? Probably not.

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3 hours ago, aisle9 said:

Wowee zowee.

 

For one, mining applications (particularly blockchain) have already contributed far more to society than gaming ever has, and are continuing to contribute more than your ability to play Whinecraft at 16K ever will.

 

Two, you're advocating market controls on GPUs. Market controls are typically employed to make sure that, for example, gas isn't $20/gallon while a hurricane is approaching. They're there to make sure that everyone has a fair shot at essential items (and they kinda failed there...). They're not there to make sure that you can play Whinecraft at 16K instead of "your" GPU being sold to someone who's going to use it to combine its power with others to advance science, to fold, or to redefine currency. You know, someone who's going to better society with it?

 

If a retailer wants to put a limit on how many of a certain item can be bought by a certain person, go for it. I completely support retailers doing that. It is not, has never been, and never shall be the place of any government say, "NVIDIA, you can't sell RTX 3080s to 'scalpers' because Little Master Privilege wants to play Whinecraft in 16K, and he wants to play it now."

Putting the cart before the horse.  Blockchain did not come out of mining, mining came out of blockchain. Blockchain was developed for bank communication.   Dont try to take credit where credit is not due. Also remember video games go back over 40 years.  Before PONG. You really want to put mining against ALL of that? All the people who redeveloped hand eye coordination after strokes or surgeons who practiced, or virtual surgery or any number of things that provably did come out of graphics technology?  Heck we can even throw blockchain in as part of mining and it’s still a walkover. 

Life is like a bowl of chocolates: there are all these little crinkly paper cups everywhere.

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2 hours ago, Bombastinator said:

Putting the cart before the horse.  Blockchain did not come out of mining, mining came out of blockchain. Blockchain was developed for bank communication.   Dont try to take credit where credit is not due. Also remember video games go back over 40 years.  Before PONG. You really want to put mining against ALL of that? All the people who redeveloped hand eye coordination after strokes or surgeons who practiced, or virtual surgery or any number of things that provably did come out of graphics technology?  Heck we can even throw blockchain in as part of mining and it’s still a walkover. 

I think this is steering the topic far off. All GPU's were first intended for business use, and still are (CAD/CAM, Gaming, Engineering, and Film/Television.) The next use after that is consumer use, and consumers get the slightly cheaper, cut down versions of the business model. You don't really want precision errors engineering (not that GPU's are being used that way.)

 

Miners, if it was just about recycling dies that are unusable for GPU use, there would be no complaint, because those parts would never find their way into GPU's, or at least you'd think that. But then you'll notice the GT parts exist and wonder why these PCIe 1x parts are even being made. But as it turns out, yes these 1-lane parts are being made explicitly for mining/folding, because they don't require the PCIe bandwidth at all. It does appear that these are "defective" or "binned" cards in a way as parts are disabled on them that would otherwise work.

 

 

Now if it was just about reusing parts that otherwise would just be destroyed, yeah, we shouldn't be complaining. But that's not the problem here. The problem here is that scalpers and miners are competing for the exact same gaming cards the gaming customers want, because they want to be the first to have them. If you're not in a rush for an upgrade, you can quite literately skip this generation, and wait for the next generation, as the the upgrade landrush and the miners will have already been satisfied. That's what I think nVidia flubbed with the 20xx parts, they released these parts at a price point that only made sense for mining rigs, and then had to backtrack and make the 1660 to save face that the RT tech was immature.

 

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10 hours ago, aisle9 said:

For one, mining applications (particularly blockchain) have already contributed far more to society than gaming ever has

This is just so utterly wrong and simply an insult to anyone working as a GPU, game or CAD developer. As I have pointed out earlier, gaming has been almost the sole driver for the enormous GPU development and advances we've seen over the last decades (before GPGPUs became a thing).

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in the end, it's not about what's better for humanity or whatever, i doubt nvidia cares, even if you think they should

 

it's who can bring out the cash, or strike the deal first

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I hate Intel's pricing, Ryzen's weird quirks, Nvidia's pricing, and Radeon GPUs in general

 

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Products I like:

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Sony Xperia Z1 / Z2 / 10 ii, Asus Strix 970 / 1070, Samsung SSD, WD HDD, Corsair PSUs (AX, RM, CX(grey)), GeForce GPU, NZXT N450/S340, be quiet! Coolers, G.Skill Trident RAM, Logitech M525, Logitech G440, Razer Deathadder Elite

 

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Companies I absolutely adore: (and hope it stays that way)

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be quiet! - sent me AM4 mounting for my DRP3 even though it's way past the timeframe stated, no questions asked

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Nvidia, Intel, Apple, TMT (Thundermatch, a retailer)

 

Personal Blacklisted Companies:

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Acer: shit tier quality products, shit tier customer service thus far, they "tried" to solve my issue but they arent really doing anything but delaying and delaying. (on-going case since July)

Gigabyte: horrible customer service (gigabyte had literally 0 customer service, asked me to go to retailer with NO WAY to email them about a question) but at least they fixed my shit in ONE MONTH (would probably take me 1 hour to fix if they let me email them)

XiaoMi Phones: built like a tank but the software is buggy as all hell

Seagate HDD: had too many dead seagate drives

Kingston SSD: 300V controller swap thingy

Razer (except their mouse)

 

Remember, just because I had good/bad experiences with these companies/product, doesn't mean you will have similar experiences too. I would still recommend these products if they made sense for your needs, but I'll add a disclaimer of my experience if it's relevant. Feel free to DM me asking why they are where they are.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Dracarris said:

This is just so utterly wrong and simply an insult to anyone working as a GPU, game or CAD developer. As I have pointed out earlier, gaming has been almost the sole driver for the enormous GPU development and advances we've seen over the last decades (before GPGPUs became a thing).

I think you missed his point entirely. His point was not that mining advanced the development of GPU technology more than gaming, but rather mining has contributed more to society in terms of scientific contribution (curecoin being an example) compared to gamings contributions. I disagree with his statement, but I figured I'd clarify on his behalf to avoid further confusion.

 

Contributions to society should not be viewed strictly from a viewpoint of advancements in medicines or technology. Gaming as a medium has changed how we view entertainment and has made significant cultural advancements in our society. Modern gaming has changed the way we interact with one another quite substantially. If you told your ancestors a few decades ago that you were playing a game with someone half way across the world in Germany while you were from the US, they'd think you were crazy. 

 

I still think the hate towards miners is unwarranted. They are paying customers like the rest of us. You can convince yourself that it's "unfair" that they are buying multiple GPU's to mine with, but if they are willing to pay that investment, I see no harm in them doing so. The issue you people have with bots, I completely understand, however that is not the fault of miners, but rather the fault of retailers failing to combat against them. As for scalpers, they are taking advantage of the high demand. It sucks, but that's capitalism at work. As long as someone is willing to pay, they'll continue to scalp.

 

It's not fun, but this is likely going to be the new normal for quite some time, at least for the foreseeable future.

My (incomplete) memory overclocking guide: 

 

Does memory speed impact gaming performance? Click here to find out!

On 1/2/2017 at 9:32 PM, MageTank said:

Sometimes, we all need a little inspiration.

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, MageTank said:

I think you missed his point entirely. His point was not that mining advanced the development of GPU technology more than gaming, but rather mining has contributed more to society in terms of scientific contribution (curecoin being an example) compared to gamings contributions. I disagree with his statement, but I figured I'd clarify on his behalf to avoid further confusion.

Well gaming advanced GPU technology which in itself is a huge contribution to society and science. And even leaving this out of the picture, all the algorithms and knowledge that resulted from decades of game engine development probably has as well a much higher weight than what mining has.

7 minutes ago, MageTank said:

Contributions to society should not be viewed strictly from a viewpoint of advancements in medicines or technology. Gaming as a medium has changed how we view entertainment and has made significant cultural advancements in our society. Modern gaming has changed the way we interact with one another quite substantially. If you told your ancestors a few decades ago that you were playing a game with someone half way across the world in Germany while you were from the US, they'd think you were crazy.

Yep.

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I'll say this like I always do with mining.
Shame and its a waste. Only cause mining does literally nothing to help. All that horsepower is going to...? Generate random garbage numbers that mean absolutely nothing at the end of the day. Its not calculating cancer research, quantum mechanics, weather forecasts, molecular mechanics. Or the next digit in Pi, heck its not even used to entertain someone.

The more and more I think about crypto miners, the more I get reminded of bot goldfarm networks in MMOs. Automated systems taking away resources to generate virtual currency that will be exchanged for real currency/goods. Nobody likes goldfamers in MMOs. Why do they get a pass in real life?

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4 minutes ago, DeScruff said:

heck its not even used to entertain someone.

mining as a hobby is a thing (one of mine)

and it feeds families (not me)

and pay for my computer upgrades (as much as someone else doesnt want to admit that gpu mining isnt profitable, yet every time a gpu launch miners still buy them)

Things I need help with:

Spoiler

none atm

 

I hate Intel's pricing, Ryzen's weird quirks, Nvidia's pricing, and Radeon GPUs in general

 

Spoiler

 

Products I like:

Spoiler

Sony Xperia Z1 / Z2 / 10 ii, Asus Strix 970 / 1070, Samsung SSD, WD HDD, Corsair PSUs (AX, RM, CX(grey)), GeForce GPU, NZXT N450/S340, be quiet! Coolers, G.Skill Trident RAM, Logitech M525, Logitech G440, Razer Deathadder Elite

 

Products I hate:

Spoiler

Xperia Z3, XiaoMi 5c, Radeon GPUs, Razer Audio Products, any bloatwares

 

Companies I absolutely adore: (and hope it stays that way)

Spoiler

be quiet! - sent me AM4 mounting for my DRP3 even though it's way past the timeframe stated, no questions asked

Corsair - very good RMA experience, absolutely recommend

 

Companies I hate:

Spoiler

Nvidia, Intel, Apple, TMT (Thundermatch, a retailer)

 

Personal Blacklisted Companies:

Spoiler

Acer: shit tier quality products, shit tier customer service thus far, they "tried" to solve my issue but they arent really doing anything but delaying and delaying. (on-going case since July)

Gigabyte: horrible customer service (gigabyte had literally 0 customer service, asked me to go to retailer with NO WAY to email them about a question) but at least they fixed my shit in ONE MONTH (would probably take me 1 hour to fix if they let me email them)

XiaoMi Phones: built like a tank but the software is buggy as all hell

Seagate HDD: had too many dead seagate drives

Kingston SSD: 300V controller swap thingy

Razer (except their mouse)

 

Remember, just because I had good/bad experiences with these companies/product, doesn't mean you will have similar experiences too. I would still recommend these products if they made sense for your needs, but I'll add a disclaimer of my experience if it's relevant. Feel free to DM me asking why they are where they are.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Moonzy said:

mining as a hobby is a thing (one of mine)

and it feeds families (not me)

and pay for my computer upgrades (as much as someone else doesnt want to admit that gpu mining isnt profitable, yet every time a gpu launch miners still buy them)


Your entertained by the numbers that crypto is generating? (If so I highly recommend a random number generator =P )
Or are you just entertained by what crypto mining brings and how much your hardware can do such a task?
Would crypto be less entertaining if was calculating... I dunno a frame of the next CG movie or something else, something else where the numbers have actual meaning.

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8 minutes ago, DeScruff said:


Your entertained by the numbers that crypto is generating? (If so I highly recommend a random number generator =P )
Or are you just entertained by what crypto mining brings and how much your hardware can do such a task?
Would crypto be less entertaining if was calculating... I dunno a frame of the next CG movie or something else, something else where the numbers have actual meaning.

I don't find mining interesting myself, but there's also people whose favorite game is Cinebench. They could also be rendering a frame of the next CG movie, but they are rendering the same image over and over instead, often at very low levels of energy efficiency, to see if their latest hundred-dollar custom loop tweak shaved some Celsius somewhere.

From my perspective, to each its own, as long as they internalize any cost generated by their activity. That requires well-functioning markets and market failure corrections. If so, whatever you do with your stuff, you are adequately compensating society for removing said stuff from an alternative use, and choosing to do so because you find it more valuable than what you are paying for it.

 

With that in mind, there are a number of potential issues manifesting themselves in scalping and mining; however, they are very different, even opposite at times, of what people in these threads typically point out. With a majority of users coming from proud market economies, I'm really curious on what views people actually hold with respect to markets as a resource allocation mechanism, and how contradictory those views can get. However, that would become off-topic in a half off-topic discussion, so I'll have to delay my inquiry until finding a suitable place for it.

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19 minutes ago, DeScruff said:

Your entertained by the numbers that crypto is generating?

i find it fun to explore hardware's capability and i learnt a lot while mining

and earning my computer's next upgrade is kinda fun

 

20 minutes ago, DeScruff said:

Would crypto be less entertaining if was calculating... I dunno a frame of the next CG movie or something else, something else where the numbers have actual meaning.

that would be a tough question to answer, as i have a niche hobby to begin with

Things I need help with:

Spoiler

none atm

 

I hate Intel's pricing, Ryzen's weird quirks, Nvidia's pricing, and Radeon GPUs in general

 

Spoiler

 

Products I like:

Spoiler

Sony Xperia Z1 / Z2 / 10 ii, Asus Strix 970 / 1070, Samsung SSD, WD HDD, Corsair PSUs (AX, RM, CX(grey)), GeForce GPU, NZXT N450/S340, be quiet! Coolers, G.Skill Trident RAM, Logitech M525, Logitech G440, Razer Deathadder Elite

 

Products I hate:

Spoiler

Xperia Z3, XiaoMi 5c, Radeon GPUs, Razer Audio Products, any bloatwares

 

Companies I absolutely adore: (and hope it stays that way)

Spoiler

be quiet! - sent me AM4 mounting for my DRP3 even though it's way past the timeframe stated, no questions asked

Corsair - very good RMA experience, absolutely recommend

 

Companies I hate:

Spoiler

Nvidia, Intel, Apple, TMT (Thundermatch, a retailer)

 

Personal Blacklisted Companies:

Spoiler

Acer: shit tier quality products, shit tier customer service thus far, they "tried" to solve my issue but they arent really doing anything but delaying and delaying. (on-going case since July)

Gigabyte: horrible customer service (gigabyte had literally 0 customer service, asked me to go to retailer with NO WAY to email them about a question) but at least they fixed my shit in ONE MONTH (would probably take me 1 hour to fix if they let me email them)

XiaoMi Phones: built like a tank but the software is buggy as all hell

Seagate HDD: had too many dead seagate drives

Kingston SSD: 300V controller swap thingy

Razer (except their mouse)

 

Remember, just because I had good/bad experiences with these companies/product, doesn't mean you will have similar experiences too. I would still recommend these products if they made sense for your needs, but I'll add a disclaimer of my experience if it's relevant. Feel free to DM me asking why they are where they are.

 

 

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