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How is 10Gb/s achieved?

Go to solution Solved by WereCatf,
13 minutes ago, phongle123 said:

My understanding is that, for example: If I want to transfer files at 10Gb/s from my PC to my NAS.

I have a Router with only 1Gb/s networking and use that 1Gb/s port to plug into a switch. That switch has to have at least 2x 10Gb/s port which I use to plug both the PC and the NAS into the switch's 2x 10Gb/s ports (assuming that both the PC and the NAS also have 10Gb/s capable networking hardware). Then I will achieve 10Gb/s between the PC/NAS?

The router is irrelevant, if both the NAS and the PC are connected directly to the switch. Other than that, yes.

Can someone help me understand how 10Gb/s work?

 

My understanding is that, for example: If I want to transfer files at 10Gb/s from my PC to my NAS.

I have a Router with only 1Gb/s networking and use that 1Gb/s port to plug into a switch. That switch has to have at least 2x 10Gb/s port which I use to plug both the PC and the NAS into the switch's 2x 10Gb/s ports (assuming that both the PC and the NAS also have 10Gb/s capable networking hardware). Then I will achieve 10Gb/s between the PC/NAS?

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My information was incorrect, please ignore it.

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Anything network related will be as fast as the slowest link it has to go through.

Anything in your network will have to go through the router, no matter if the two devices are sitting next to each other, or if you're going through the internet.

 

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The switch doesn't route the actual traffic packages, your router does. The PC and NAS need to communicate via the router, which will make it so the communication speed is 1Gb/s max. Your router needs to be 10Gb/s, so does your switch and NAS and PC (and all the cabling) to achieve 10Gb/s transfers between the PC and NAS.

 

Of course, that is unless you directly connect the NAS to the PC, if for example the NAS has muiltiple ethernet ports.

If you do that (connect the NAS and PC directly to each other via a 10Gb/s connection), you can achieve 10Gb/s transfers between the two without changing anything with the router.

"We're all in this together, might as well be friends" Tom, Toonami.

 mini_cardboard: a 4% keyboard build log and how keyboards workhttps://linustechtips.com/topic/1328547-mini_cardboard-a-4-keyboard-build-log-and-how-keyboards-work/

 

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13 minutes ago, phongle123 said:

My understanding is that, for example: If I want to transfer files at 10Gb/s from my PC to my NAS.

I have a Router with only 1Gb/s networking and use that 1Gb/s port to plug into a switch. That switch has to have at least 2x 10Gb/s port which I use to plug both the PC and the NAS into the switch's 2x 10Gb/s ports (assuming that both the PC and the NAS also have 10Gb/s capable networking hardware). Then I will achieve 10Gb/s between the PC/NAS?

The router is irrelevant, if both the NAS and the PC are connected directly to the switch. Other than that, yes.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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5 minutes ago, minibois said:

Anything in your network will have to go through the router, no matter if the two devices are sitting next to each other, or if you're going through the internet.

No, that's incorrect.

5 minutes ago, minibois said:

The switch doesn't route the actual traffic packages, your router does. The PC and NAS need to communicate via the router, which will make it so the communication speed is 1Gb/s max. Your router needs to be 10Gb/s, so does your switch and NAS and PC (and all the cabling) to achieve 10Gb/s transfers between the PC and NAS.

You have completely misunderstood how switches work. If they worked like that, they'd entirely fucking useless. Switches maintain a MAC-address list and if they see a MAC-address on a specific port, they'll know to direct traffic intended for that MAC-address to that port, all without needing external routers or anything.

 

Go ahead, connect two devices to a switch without a router and give those devices static IP-addresses: you'll see that they can still ping each other just fine!

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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3 minutes ago, WereCatf said:

No, that's incorrect.

You have completely misunderstood how switches work. If they worked like that, they'd entirely fucking useless. Switches maintain a MAC-address list and if they see a MAC-address on a specific port, they'll know to direct traffic intended for that MAC-address to that port, all without needing external routers or anything.

 

Go ahead, connect two devices to a switch without a router and give those devices static IP-addresses: you'll see that they can still ping each other just fine!

Ah okay, I had understood the traffic has to go through the router, didn't know it went from the switch right away to the other device connected to the switch.

Thank you for the information and correction!

"We're all in this together, might as well be friends" Tom, Toonami.

 mini_cardboard: a 4% keyboard build log and how keyboards workhttps://linustechtips.com/topic/1328547-mini_cardboard-a-4-keyboard-build-log-and-how-keyboards-work/

 

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1 minute ago, minibois said:

Ah okay, I had understood the traffic has to go through the router, didn't know it went from the switch right away to the other device connected to the switch.

Thank you for the information and correction!

If you're interested in learning more, you could e.g. read the Wikipedia-article for ARP. ARP is the mechanism/one of the mechanisms by which switches and routers know which port some specific device is, or at least was last seen on.

 

ARP makes a lot of fun things possible, like e.g. you can have two servers running the same services, with one server responding on e.g. IP-address 192.168.17.2 with a MAC-address 02:00:DE:AD:BE:EF. If that server goes down, the other server can send an ARP-message saying "Hey, that MAC-address is actually me! Direct all the relevant traffic to me" and POOF -- you have just gotten yourself a fail-tolerant server and anyone trying to access those services will instead be served by the second server!

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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45 minutes ago, WereCatf said:

The router is irrelevant, if both the NAS and the PC are connected directly to the switch. Other than that, yes.

Interesting, but that does make sense. My router reasoning was mentioned because I though you'd need internet connecting them even though I knew traffic wouldn't go through the router as 10Gb/s going through 1Gb/s back to 10Gb/s doesn't make sense.

 

While on the topic of making things irrelevant. Would it work without the switch by connecting the PC's ethernet cable directly to the NAS to achieve 10Gb/s speed transfers?

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1 minute ago, phongle123 said:

While on the topic of making things irrelevant. Would it work without the switch by connecting the PC directly to the NAS to achieve 10Gb/s speed transfers?

Yes, you'd just need to then set static IP-addresses on both for the relevant NICs.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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Assuming that you have 10GbE interfaces on both the PC and the NAS, and they are plugged in to 10GbE interfaces on the switch using Cat 6 or later cables, the answer is that you may or may not have close to 10 Gb/s transfers. The limiting factors that may decrease the transfer speed will be the CPU capability and current load of both the PC and NAS device, the ability of the switch to actually forward traffic at that rate, overhead and efficiency of the software being used for the transfer, and the read/write speed of the disks on both the PC and NAS.

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@phongle123i would assume that your NAS will be the bottleneck of the data transfer in this case. Except you have an fast RAID in there. Also your storage drives in your PC have to keep up the speeds.

 

 

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