Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Hello im planning to order a custom watercool loop and I have some questions for what i need.

First off im gonna be using Byski and my loop will use:

-D5 Pump 1100 L/h

-Cpu block

-M2 nvme block

-Ram Block

-360mm Rad

-custom distro plate that i will be designing

-flow/temp sensor

-16 MM tubes 

 

Im planning to add in the future a GPU block (i have a vega 56 theres not any blocks for it on the market). 


The loop will be as such :

 

Pump ---> M2 nvme ---> distro plate ---> Cpu ---> Ram ----> Distro plate ----> 360mm Rad ---> Distro Plate

 

Will my pump be strong enough to push all the water fast enough so my components dont get hot?

I know that usually people only watercool the CPU and GPU but i wanna go full Custom.

 

I only had one watercool loop with soft tube and only CPU so its gonna be the first time i try hardline


These are the parts I will be buying let me know if everything is compatible.


PS: I already have a thermaltake Hard tube 16mm but its written 5/8 on it and all my components are 1/4 so are they not compatible?

 

Thanks everyone, Stay safe

Screen Shot 2020-11-12 at 9.02.11 AM.png

Screen Shot 2020-11-12 at 9.02.20 AM.png

aliiiiii.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would probably go with a DDC on that loop since it has a higher preasure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote me for a reply, React if I was helpful, informative, or funny

 

AMD blackout rig

 

cpu: ryzen 5 3600 @4.4ghz @1.35v

gpu: rx5700xt 2200mhz

ram: vengeance lpx c15 3200mhz

mobo: gigabyte b550 pro 

psu: cooler master mwe 650w

case: masterbox mbx520

fans:Noctua industrial 3000rpm x6

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Plermpel said:

I would probably go with a DDC on that loop since it has a higher preasure.

Ive read that D5 are usually built tougher, more durable and less noise. But i will keep it in mind. Do you know if my tubes ( available in the picture above) is compatible with 1/4 threads?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Both Pumps are originally designed by the German industrial pump manufacturer LAING, and mostly just rebranded they come from hungary these days.

The D5 is the higher flow rate lower preasure variant.

The DDC is the lower flow rate high preasure varaint.

Some tests accually show that a CPU and GPU block with a Rad in series is enough that the DDC has a higher flow rate from 0-100% Speed.

The DDC runs a bit hotter and a bit louder but that isn't a Problem at all. The original DDC 1T+ (PWM) in my system is deadly silent running at 30% speed most of the time up to 100% under full load but then the fans also ramp up and are again louder than the pump. I had a D5 rebranded by EK in my system once (2x Rad, GPU, CPU) and the DDC gained me about 1,5°C better Temps under full load on the CPU and almost 3°C on the GPU.

 

Also the tubes are just related to the fittings no matter what thread, you got G1/4" Fittings for 16mm Tube on your list that's fine.

I personally think more than 12mm tubing is just for looks because the inside of a G1/4" fitting can't really exceed 10mm anyways, so tubes bigger than 12x10 are technically just unnessary volume.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Plermpel said:

Both Pumps are originally designed by the German industrial pump manufacturer LAING, and mostly just rebranded they come from hungary these days.

The D5 is the higher flow rate lower preasure variant.

The DDC is the lower flow rate high preasure varaint.

Some tests accually show that a CPU and GPU block with a Rad in series is enough that the DDC has a higher flow rate from 0-100% Speed.

The DDC runs a bit hotter and a bit louder but that isn't a Problem at all. The original DDC 1T+ (PWM) in my system is deadly silent running at 30% speed most of the time up to 100% under full load but then the fans also ramp up and are again louder than the pump. I had a D5 rebranded by EK in my system once (2x Rad, GPU, CPU) and the DDC gained me about 1,5°C better Temps under full load on the CPU and almost 3°C on the GPU.

 

Also the tubes are just related to the fittings no matter what thread, you got G1/4" Fittings for 16mm Tube on your list that's fine.

I personally think more than 12mm tubing is just for looks because the inside of a G1/4" fitting can't really exceed 10mm anyways, so tubes bigger than 12x10 are technically just unnessary volume.

Thanks alot for the answer. it explains clearly what im looking for, and i was given the tube as a gift so im gonna stick with them for now. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

D5 at ~3500RPM is good enough.

Don't recommend to water cool RAM and NVMe. Add complicity to the loop and does not provide much benefit. If air flow design is correct, those components should have enough air flow for cooling. By adding those components, you are also adding resistance in the loop.

On 11/11/2020 at 11:05 PM, vleds123 said:

PS: I already have a thermaltake Hard tube 16mm but its written 5/8 on it and all my components are 1/4 so are they not compatible?

 

G1/4 is the fitting's tread size. You need to make sure your fitting is 16mm OD(outer diameter) to fit with your 16mm tubing.

 

PS: recommend use 14mm tubing. much easier to bend than 16OD. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pump should be fine. I do about 8 blocks and 3 rads on my d5. And get the ram blocks. More is better. Only concern with the m.2 block is restriction and they normally don’t take any real consideration into flow. 
Like my mobo block separates and makes two paths and increases it’s surface area. I’d only use the m.2 block in parallel, but that would make things even more complicated. I just put heat sinks on my m.2’s. 

Main RIg Corsair Air 540, I7 8700k, ASUS ROG Strix Z370-H, G.Skill TridentZ 32GB, EVGA 1080TI SC Black, EVGA 850 GQ, Acer KG251Q 1920x1080@240hz 

 

Spare RIg Corsair Air 540, I7 4770K, Asus Maximus VI Extreme, G.Skill Ares 32Gb, EVGA 1080sc & 1060 SSC, Corsair CX850M, Acer GD235hz 1920x1080@120hz

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×