Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Serching for DOS equivalents of Windows applications.

Go to solution Solved by Nayr438,

What are you planning to do with the Machine?

With a Pentium III and 128MB of ram I would probably run Windows 95 or 98, however if your really set on DOS I would probably go for FreeDOS personally which is compatible with DOS applications.

 

FreeDOS

https://www.freedos.org

 

FreeDOS Software

https://www.freedos.org/software/

 

There are some archives floating around for DOS Applications, however it may be against the forums policy for me to share those.

Hi

Recently i got an old Compaq on which i installed DOS 5. The system runs fine, but it lacks built in applications, becouse of that I would like to ask for help in finding DOS equivalents of according Windows applications:

-Tiny CAD

-GIMP

-VLC media player

-Microsoft Photos

Also it would be nice if those DOS applications would be open source.

Thanks for all answers

Link to post
Share on other sites

specs? 

you'd be better using linux

if it was useful give it a like :) btw if your into linux pay a visit here  and i will be thankful if you send me an opinion here  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And how exactly would you run any of these on a text mode OS? You're probably better of with Windows or Linux.

 

I mean, there were games etc. on DOS, but the software would have to take care of initializing the graphics mode. Pretty sure no modern software (that is not a game) does that. Also there's the whole 640K lower memory limitation of DOS... Seriously, use Linux.

Remember to quote or @mention others, so they are notified of your reply

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

And how exactly would you run any of these on a text mode OS? You're probably better of with Windows or Linux.

windows out of question but something like tinycore might work

if it was useful give it a like :) btw if your into linux pay a visit here  and i will be thankful if you send me an opinion here  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mahyar said:

windows out of question but something like tinycore might work

Not sure what "old Compaq" means exactly, but yeah my favorite would be some flavor of Linux. Especially since all the apps (or equivalents) mentioned above are available on Linux.

Remember to quote or @mention others, so they are notified of your reply

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Eigenvektor said:

Not sure what "old Compaq" means exactly, but yeah my favorite would be some flavor of Linux. Especially since all the apps (or equivalents) mentioned above are available on Linux.

Pentium III 128MB RAM, also it is not gonna be used as my main or anything like that, i just wanted to expirence DOS (Yes i know i could use virtual machine for DOS but it's not the same)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Expecting DOS to do modern workloads is not giving you the DOS experience you're looking for.

 

Seriously. A Pentium III cannot decode HD Video. I've tried.

Main: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X, Nvidia GTX 780, 16 GB 2667 MT/s DDR4 Fedora 33 x86_64

Secondary: Intel Xeon X5670, Nvidia GTX 660, 24 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3 Windows 10 Home x86_64

Server: Intel Xeon X5670, 60 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3-R Ubuntu Server 20.04.1 LTS x86_64

Laptop: Intel Core i5-3320M, 16 GB 1600 MT/s DDR3 Fedora 32 x86_64

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Amforev said:

Pentium III 128MB RAM, also it is not gonna be used as my main or anything like that, i just wanted to expirence DOS (Yes i know i could use virtual machine for DOS but it's not the same)

As someone who lived through the DOS era, not something I would do voluntarily. Specialized "autoexec.bat" for certain games, just to have enough of that precious 640K lower memory available for that one game, no thanks :P And Windows 3.1, yay.

 

If you want to do some retro-gaming, I guess go for it, but if you want to watch videos etc. I'd rather go for a Linux distro with a lightweight desktop.

Remember to quote or @mention others, so they are notified of your reply

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Eigenvektor said:

 I guess go for it, but if you want to watch videos etc.

I should have specified that by VLC media player equivalent i ment program for audio playback, my bad sry.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Amforev said:

Pentium III 128MB RAM, also it is not gonna be used as my main or anything like that, i just wanted to expirence DOS (Yes i know i could use virtual machine for DOS but it's not the same)

vert similar to my first pc accept i had ram and for dos you'd better go with vm  and the only thing that machine can run is win xp or tinycore 

if it was useful give it a like :) btw if your into linux pay a visit here  and i will be thankful if you send me an opinion here  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

What are you planning to do with the Machine?

With a Pentium III and 128MB of ram I would probably run Windows 95 or 98, however if your really set on DOS I would probably go for FreeDOS personally which is compatible with DOS applications.

 

FreeDOS

https://www.freedos.org

 

FreeDOS Software

https://www.freedos.org/software/

 

There are some archives floating around for DOS Applications, however it may be against the forums policy for me to share those.

Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Amforev said:

Pentium III 128MB RAM, also it is not gonna be used as my main or anything like that, i just wanted to expirence DOS (Yes i know i could use virtual machine for DOS but it's not the same)

Way back when DOS was new people used their computers very differently. Don't expect to be able to just install a modern audio player or graphical editor. I'd be surprised if you could even find suitable audio drivers for your system or codecs to play anything other than low bitrate WAV files. When the Pentium III came out DOS was already quite obsolete - yours is a Windows 2000 era machine.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

What others said, I agree!

 

The question really here is "why"? If it is just because you want to know what one can and could do in DOS, just because you have too much free time, then go for it. Otherwise, it just doesn't make much sense.

 

There are media players for DOS, but they are audio only. I've used cubic player, and it can play practically any audio file if the computer has enough horsepower to play it. So, it is kind of "VLC for DOS", but for Audio files only. A Pentium III should be able to handle any MP3, Ogg Vorbis or FLAC file, so you can use such an old machine as a DOS Jukebox, if you want to. (EDIT: seems like Cubic player does not support ogg vorbis / FLAC, though, only MP3, tracker file formats, direct CD playback etc.)

 

DemoScene was quite big back in the day, and there were loads of music trackers floating around (Fast Tracker II, Scream Tracker, Impulse Tracker...). There are still modern trackers today and some are in active development (modplug tracker? Milky Tracker?), but most home music making software have evolved into something a bit more advanced. After all, a music tracker is a bit of limited as a concept by todays standards, but many home studio software still can have some elements of their UI and can do everything a tracker could, and a lot more.

 

I recall I used to play with Deluxe Paint and similar drawing applications back then.

 

DOS did have some business applications at the time. I never used them, as I was a gaming teen but something like WordPerfect comes into my mind (seems like it still exists as a trademark, but it's history is indeed very long, seems to even predate DOS). I don't remember other names at the moment, perhaps CorelDraw? There probably were some CAD applications, but they will probably be very, very rudimentary and more complex to use. I would imagine having to parametrize everything by typing, and for any kind of preview of something complex, wait for 5 seconds or more for the render to complete. CAD was a thing, but serious CAD designers and businesses had something more powerful and expensive (PowerPC workstations?) and/or the workflow was much, much more different, probably awkward by todays standards. But I'm a bit guessing here since I'm too young to actually having used any kind of CAD in DOS.

 

I don't ever recall seeing a video player for DOS. Moving digitized video on home computers was a curiosity back then, and the quality was not something you would actually want to look for a prolonged time. I recall seeing Media Players capable playing some kind of video in windows 3.11, but it was not HD, not even SD, but something way, way worse. HD space and optical media could not have been able to hold large enough files anyways, even if some processors could have been fast enough for SD video.

 

After HDDs became large enough and optical media more common - SD video crept also into computer screens. Media space was the last bottle neck, I believe. But that was in Windows 9X era.

Edited by Wild Penquin
Link to post
Share on other sites

I came back to visit this forum and actually made a quick Google Search for DOS media players (I do have a retro DOS gaming computer so I have some interest to use it for media playback for show-off purposes... doesn't make sense otherwise!).

 

I found some interesting pages:

https://www.4dos.info/dhardw.htm

http://dosprograms.info.tt/sound.htm

 

Those pages have other interesting software than media players, too.

 

Bottom line: DVD players seem to exist for DOS. Seems like more modern audio formats (FLAC, OGG Vorbis...) can be played back. Quite possibly because some hackers decided we need to do this "just because we can". Most probably majority, if not all, of the more advanced media players was made indeed after Win9X was already the main OS on home PCs.

 

But I didn't scour those pages thoroughly / actually try any of these (yet). A Media Player (for DVDs / SD Video) / Jukebox running DOS is feasible. Does it make sense? No! Is it cool? H**** YEAH!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Newegg

×