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RAM SPEED IS LESS THAN I HAVE !!!!

Hello guys so i have 2x4GB ram ( 8GB ) and they are set to 2666Mhz but the task manager and CPU Z say that my ram speed is 1333Mhz ! so someone told me its giving 1333Mhz to each one so 2 sticks will be 2666Mhz but i tried to remove one stick  so i have only one stick of 4GB and now it still shows me that the speed is 1333Mhz !!! on the bios the speed is 2666Mhz THATS WEIRD RIGHT ?

is there anything i can do to fix this please ? 

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DDR = Double Data Rate

1333 x2 = 2666

Your RAM is running correctly and that's 100% normal and fine.

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4 minutes ago, Lurick said:

DDR = Double Data Rate

1333 x2 = 2666

Your RAM is running correctly and that's 100% normal and fine.

This. Confused me the first time too.

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6 minutes ago, Lurick said:

DDR = Double Data Rate

1333 x2 = 2666

Your RAM is running correctly and that's 100% normal and fine.

ii appreciate that 

but thats what i thought when i had 2 sticks but now im using only 1 sticks , why its using only the half of the speed ? first it was splitting the speed to both sticks but now its shouldnt be splitting right ? because im using only 1  ( sorry im bad at these stuffs ) 

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Just now, hyrix7Q said:

ii appreciate that 

but thats what i thought when i had 2 sticks but now im using only 1 sticks why its using only the half of the speed ? first it was splitting the speed to both sticks but now its shouldnt be splitting right ? because im using only 1  ( sorry im bad at these stuffs ) 

No, whoever said it splits is incorrect. It's per stick, period.

You're getting the full speed, CPU-Z displays the single data rate speed.

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9 minutes ago, hyrix7Q said:

ii appreciate that 

but thats what i thought when i had 2 sticks but now im using only 1 sticks , why its using only the half of the speed ? first it was splitting the speed to both sticks but now its shouldnt be splitting right ? because im using only 1  ( sorry im bad at these stuffs ) 

nope ddr means it can send data on the rise and fall of the signal and has nothing to do with the amount of sticks

so the signal is technically 1333mhz but the data sending rate is 2666mhz

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17 minutes ago, hyrix7Q said:

ii appreciate that 

but thats what i thought when i had 2 sticks but now im using only 1 sticks , why its using only the half of the speed ? first it was splitting the speed to both sticks but now its shouldnt be splitting right ? because im using only 1  ( sorry im bad at these stuffs ) 

That's incorrect. 1333MHz DDR = 2666MHz SDR is why you see 2666MHz being mentioned. You could go to quad channel platforms like X299 or TRX40 and they still run the same memory frequencies as dual channel platforms

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Adding to what @spartaman64 mentioned.

21 minutes ago, spartaman64 said:

nope ddr means it can send data on the rise and fall of the signal and has nothing to do with the amount of sticks

so the signal is technically 1333mhz but the data sending rate is 2666mhz

 

The ACTUAL frequency is 1333 MHz, but since RAM is able to send 2x data signals per one complete clock cycle, the EFFECTIVE frequency is 2666 MHz.

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Everyone has been so helpful already so I'll just reiterate.

 

Make sure you're not confusing dual channel with DDR

 

Dual channel doubles the bandwidth by using two dimms at once, so when you had two slots filled.

 

DDR4, as mentioned, uses dual data rate, while software tends to only report single data rate.

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Dual channel is about something else.

 

Each memory stick is 64 bit wide - this means each time you read or write stuff from/to a ram stick, 64 bits are put on the pins of the ram stick.

Picture each Hz as a pulse of energy... the memory controller can see that pulse raising up and then go down down. That's one tick, one cycle, one Hz ... DDR memory sticks can put 64 bits on the pins of the stick as the pulse goes up, and after the pulse reached the peak and starts to go down, it puts a new set of 64 bits on the pins. So in total, on each Hz, you get 128 bits on the pins of the stick.

This is the reason why the memory sticks are advertised as double the frequency, because a DDR memory stick would feel twice as fast compared to an old style SDRAM - so when DDR and DDR2 were invented, manufacturer had to make it somehow obvious that a DDR stick was faster compared to a SDRAM stick, even if running at same "frequency".

 

Dual Channel is about reading and writing on 2 sticks at the same time.

Let's say you have to write 4 KB of data to ram ... that's 4096 bytes / 128 bits = 32 Hz ... this is how fast you could read the data from a single stick.

But, if you use dual channel mode, the memory controller can put half of that data on the first stick, and half the data on the second stick, so now each cycle, there's 2 x 128 bits read or written, so now your 4096 bytes are retrieved in half the time.

 

it's like writing with both hands on two sheets of paper, you finish in almost half the time.

 

It won't always be two times as fast, because memory sticks take commands and they need a bit of time to prepare the data (to find the data in the ram chips and get it ready to be transferred or written) and once it's ready it can be sent in a burst.  IF the amount of data retrieved is big enough, you do get an improved performance.

 

So for example, it may take 10 nanoseconds for the sticks to prepare the data, but only 4 nanoseconds to then transfer the data from a single stick.

If you go with 2 memory sticks and dual channel, it still takes 10 nanoseconds on both sticks to get the data ready, but then it takes  only 2 nanoseconds to transfer the data - so you have 10+4 ns vs 10+2 ns -  it's not double the performance.

 

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