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Does anyone know and can explain in simple sentence?

Don't use Lan 4 if you're a gamer

 

I think the examples are really explanatory, use Lan 4 for situations like those.

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A subnet is a network within a network. Think of it like this, your external IP is your city, your subnet is your town and your local IP is your home address.

 

Its possible to have multiple smaller networks all running inside one large network. Its useful in large networks where domains are used to separate different parts or as the example says, to separate security equipment from your main network.

 

To have direct connects between subnets you need to create bridges or static routes which allows you to control which devices can access the subnet and which ones cannot.

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An "overlapping network" on LAN 4 would be one that uses the same IP address range as the one that is configured for LAN 1-3.

 

For example if you use the network 192.168.1.x / 255.255.255.0 then every IP in the range 192.168.1.1 – 192.168.1.254 would be on the same network (.0 and .255 are somewhat special and can't be used directly).

 

If you use that address range on LAN 1-3, their recommendation is to use another network (or IP address range) on LAN 4. So for example a computer connected to LAN 4 should use an IP from a network like 192.168.2.x.

 

This also means the machine connected to LAN 4 can't communicate directly with the the PCs connected to LAN 1-3. Instead of using the router as a simple switch, they need to communicate through the router using NAT (network address translation).

 

(This is simplified, you could use other IPs and subnet masks, but I hope the basic idea is clear)

Remember to quote or @mention others, so they are notified of your reply

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Yeah waht @Fasauceome said.

You can see in the other explanations it goes DEEEP. ;)

 

Its for adding extra networks. Thats about the easiest to say it.
If you dont need it, ignore it. Most likely the speeds on that port might be a bit slower as well.

So just use the first 3, and you good.

 

If thats not enough buy a cheap switch and plug that into one of the first 3 ethernet jacks on there.

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21 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

A subnet is a network within a network. Think of it like this, your external IP is your city, your subnet is your town and your local IP is your home address.

 

Its possible to have multiple smaller networks all running inside one large network. Its useful in large networks where domains are used to separate different parts or as the example says, to separate security equipment from your main network.

 

To have direct connects between subnets you need to create bridges or static routes which allows you to control which devices can access the subnet and which ones cannot.

 

21 minutes ago, Eigenvektor said:

An "overlapping network" on LAN 4 would be one that uses the same IP address range as the one that is configured for LAN 1-3.

 

For example if you use the network 192.168.1.x / 255.255.255.0 then every IP in the range 192.168.1.1 – 192.168.1.254 would be on the same network (.0 and .255 are somewhat special and can't be used directly).

 

If you use that address range on LAN 1-3, their recommendation is to use another network (or IP address range) on LAN 4. So for example a computer connected to LAN 4 should use an IP from a network like 192.168.2.x.

 

This also means the machine connected to LAN 4 can't communicate directly with the the PCs connected to LAN 1-3. Instead of using the router as a simple switch, they need to communicate through the router using NAT (network address translation).

 

(This is simplified, you could use other IPs and subnet masks, but I hope the basic idea is clear)

 

37 minutes ago, Fasauceome said:

Don't use Lan 4 if you're a gamer

 

I think the examples are really explanatory, use Lan 4 for situations like those.

 

10 minutes ago, HanZie82 said:

Yeah waht @Fasauceome said.

You can see in the other explanations it goes DEEEP. ;)

 

Its for adding extra networks. Thats about the easiest to say it.
If you dont need it, ignore it. Most likely the speeds on that port might be a bit slower as well.

So just use the first 3, and you good.

 

If thats not enough buy a cheap switch and plug that into one of the first 3 ethernet jacks on there.

Appreciated!

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