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Is there a way to tell how reliable this 10yo+ 1000W PSU will be?

I got this old ULT-HE1000X PSU from an old dieing gaming PC of little known origin, dieing of motherboard issues. I could definitely use the PSU for Optiplex upgrades, but I question it's reliability, even though it seems to be in perfect condition. Is there a way to tell if I can get a few years of reliable service out of it? The PSU fan looks and sounds mint馃憣, and there's so little dust I'd guess this was hardly used. That gives me some confidence. I'm willing to take a look inside, of course knowing the fatal dangers of touching those charged cap leads. All the decent electrical equipment I have is an analogue multimeter and an old oscilloscope with one working channel.

Quote me if you want me to get a notification. (if it's not my own thread)

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10 years old, don't use it, needs to be replaced.

i9 9900K @ 5.0 GHz, NH D15, 32 GB DDR4 3200 GSKILL Trident Z RGB, AORUS Z390 MASTER, EVGA RTX 3080 FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB, Samsung 860 EVO 1TB, Samsung 860 EVO 500GB, ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q 27", Steel Series APEX PRO, Logitech Gaming Pro Mouse, CM Master Case 5, Corsair AXI 1600W Titanium.聽

i7 8086K, AORUS Z370 Gaming 5, 16GB GSKILL RJV DDR4 3200, EVGA 2080TI FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO 250GB, (2)SAMSUNG 860 EVO 500 GB,聽Acer Predator XB1 XB271HU, Corsair HXI 850W.

i7 8700K, AORUS Z370 Ultra Gaming, 16GB 16GB DDR4 3000, EVGA 1080Ti FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 960 EVO 250GB, Corsair HX 850W.

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22 minutes ago, TheJooomes said:

I got this old ULT-HE1000X PSU from an old dieing gaming PC of little known origin, dieing of motherboard issues. I could definitely use the PSU for Optiplex upgrades, but I question it's reliability, even though it seems to be in perfect condition. Is there a way to tell if I can get a few years of reliable service out of it? The PSU fan looks and sounds mint馃憣, and there's so little dust I'd guess this was hardly used. That gives me some confidence. I'm willing to take a look inside, of course knowing the fatal dangers of touching those charged cap leads. All the decent electrical equipment I have is an analogue multimeter and an old oscilloscope with one working channel.

It's an Andyson rebrand, released in 2007. The PC was probably dying because the PSU was drifting out of spec and slowly, brutally murdering it.

If you ever need to get rid of some evidence, all you have to do is hook it up, toss some loose papers around the floor near the tower, boot up, start running Prime95 and walk away. Should be very reliable in that application.

Sincerely,

me

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Quality power supplies run their course after 10 years

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Kill Trident Z RGB - Force MP500 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black聽(with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G2 650W - Black and green theme, Razer branwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD聽- Dark moded Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

How many watts do I need?Seasonic Focus thread,聽Userbenchmark (Et al.) is trash explained, PSU misconceptions, protections explained,聽group reg is bad

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A 1000W el cheapo and a 1000W not so cheapo do the same job. El cheapo lifts an amp and needs a coffee break. Not so cheapo lifts an amp with tools and keeps lifting them all day long.聽

Good real life example is: I have a rig consisting of i7-7700k and a R9 390X. All the calculators online tell me I should have a minimum of 600W powersupply, with 400W total system power requirements. But I have 500W passive power supply (GPS-500C). Have had the rig for 3 years and no problem what so ever under load.聽

The thing is: a cheap 500W power supply has components with lower specs, thus the actual stable amps and voltages are far less. You could say the 80+ standard is a good rule of thumb. a 500W bronze psu with 80% could be taken as 80% of stated capacity, which would be 400W (realistically, it would be considered even lower, but thats down to all of the power grid factors.) A 500W platinum psu with 90+% could be taken as 450W...but with the caveat that these sorts of power supplies have extra features, quality control and component selection to ensure that 450W is maintained or at least kept in check and accounted for.聽聽

Not saying an expensive psu cant have problems, but I would trust something designed to spec rather than something designed to cost

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3 minutes ago, PriitM said:

The thing is: a cheap 500W power supply has components with lower specs, thus the actual stable amps and voltages are far less. You could say the 80+ standard is a good rule of thumb. a 500W bronze psu with 80% could be taken as 80% of stated capacity, which would be 400W (realistically, it would be considered even lower, but thats down to all of the power grid factors.) A 500W platinum psu with 90+% could be taken as 450W...but with the caveat that these sorts of power supplies have extra features, quality control and component selection to ensure that 450W is maintained or at least kept in check and accounted for.聽聽

not how it works. effiency= is not quality.

there are 80+ titaniums that are worse than 80+ silvers.

QUOTE ME聽聽FOR ANSWER.

Main PC:

Spoiler

|Ryzen 7 3700x, OC聽to 4.2ghz @1.3V, 67C, or 4.4ghz @1.456V, 87C聽||聽Asus strix 5700 XT, +50 core, +50 memory, +50 power (not a great overclocker)聽|| Asus Strix b550-A || G.skill trident Z Neo rgb 32gb 3600mhz cl16-19-19-19-39, oc to 3733mhz with the same timings ||聽Cooler Master ml360 RGB AIO || Phanteks P500A Digital聽|| Thermaltake ToughPower grand RGB750w 80+gold聽||聽Samsung 850 250gb and Adata SX 6000 Lite 500gb聽||聽Toshiba 5400rpm 1tb聽|| Asus Rog Theta 7.1聽||聽Asus Rog claymore聽|| Asus Gladius 2 origin gaming mouse聽||Monitor 1聽Asus 1080p 144hz||Monitor 2聽AOC 1080p 75hz||

Currently selling:

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|聽Ryzen 5 3400G聽||聽Gigabyte b450 S2H聽|| Hyper X fury 2x4gb 2666mhz cl 16聽||Stock cooler聽||聽Antec NX100聽|| Silverstone essential 400w聽||聽Transgend SSD 220s 480gb聽||

Currently working on:

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|聽i3 9100F聽|| Msi Ventus gtx 1050 TI聽||聽MSI Z390 A-Pro聽|| Kingston 1x16gb 2400mhz cl17 || Stock cooler聽|| Kolink Horizon RGB聽|| Silverstone essential 400w聽||聽Pny CS900 120gb ||

Tier lists for building a PC.

Motherboard tier list. Tier A for overclocking 5950x. Tier B for overclocking 5900x, Tier C for overclocking 5800X. Tier D for overclocking 5600X. Tier F for 4/6 core Cpus at stock. Tier E avoid.

(Also case airflow matter or if you are using Downcraft air cooler)

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Gpu tier list. Rtx 3000 and RX 6000 not included since not so many reviews. Tier S for Water cooling. Tier A and B for overcloking. Tier C stock and Tier D avoid.

( You can overclock Tier C just fine, but it can get very loud, that is why it is not recommended for overclocking, same with tier D)

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Psu tier List. Tier A for Rtx 3000, Vega and RX 6000. Tier B For anything else. Tier C cheap/IGPU. Tier D and E avoid.

(RTX 3000/ RX 6000 Might run just fine with higher wattage tier B unit, Rtx 3070 runs fine with tier B units)

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Cpu cooler tier list. Tier 1&2 for power hungry Cpus with Overclock. Tier 3&4 for overclocking Ryzen 3,5,7 or lower power Intel Cpus. Tier 5 for overclocking low end Cpus or 4/6 core Ryzen. Tier 6&7 for stock. Tier 8&9 Ryzen stock cooler performance. Do not waste your money!

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(With a grain of salt, I use tier C for OS myself)

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Ask me anything :)

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7 hours ago, PriitM said:

The thing is: a cheap 500W power supply has components with lower specs, thus the actual stable amps and voltages are far less. You could say the 80+ standard is a good rule of thumb. a 500W bronze psu with 80% could be taken as 80% of stated capacity, which would be 400W (realistically, it would be considered even lower, but thats down to all of the power grid factors.) A 500W platinum psu with 90+% could be taken as 450W...but with the caveat that these sorts of power supplies have extra features, quality control and component selection to ensure that 450W is maintained or at least kept in check and accounted for. 聽

This is flawed logic. All an 80+ Gold rating means is that the manufacturer sent the 80+ rating board a unit聽capable of meeting that efficiency. It means nothing about build quality or components used, just that a unit capable of that efficiency was sent for testing. Case in point: AT650BK. If you would risk your聽i7/390X system to a Logisys 鈥650W鈥 鈥80+ Gold鈥 unit on the assumption that it鈥檚 capable of pushing 585W sustained...well... enjoy your new聽PC in a few months!

聽There鈥檚 also another shady as hell practice that @jonnyGURU(IIRC) has alluded to in the past. Crap-tier manufacturers that want an 80+ or better unit will build a small number of units with high quality parts for 80+ testing then use 鈥渄irty聽ho in a Vegas back alley鈥-level parts for their production units. I鈥檓 not accusing Logisys or Ultra聽specifically of that, just saying that a highly reputable source has alluded to that.

聽If you need a certain efficiency level, look first for a PSU of acceptable quality for your system. For a dual-2080 Ti/3950X聽setup, that鈥檚 probably a top of the line unit聽from a top-tier OEM. For most systems, it might be something more like a CX or CXM. Once you鈥檝e found your performance and quality tier, start looking at other factors within that group, like efficiency and price. Buying a PSU based solely upon an 80+ rating is a good way to end up with a bad power supply.

Sincerely,

me

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