Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I think old PSU damaged some components. Need advice!

Grayblade
 Share

Hello!

 

Little bit of back story:

I used LTT forums PSU tier list to buy new PSU for my system and I ended up  getting Deepcool DQ-M. It worked great for 3 months and then stopped working (switched off before I could log to Windows). I sent PSU to warranty and while waiting put back my old Corsair CX600M 600W PSU. Meanwhile my new GPU arrived - Sapphire Pluse RX 5700 XT. I couldn't wait to try it out and since my older PSU met minimum requirements I installed new GPU to my system. After first day I noticed strange buzzing or clitter sounds - turns out it's "coil whine". The noise was at times louder and I could hear GPU coil whine over my speakers even with v-sync enabled and case closed. I decided to RMA the card and while waiting I put back my old RX 580. Now my RX 580 also did these sounds which I never heard before. I've also tried and borrowed other PSU (ELP-700S Chieftech) and my old GPU still does coil whine.

 

I'm worried that old PSU may have damaged motherboard and motherboard is causing or contributing to my GPU's coil whine.

My question is could older 600W PSU with new more powerful GPU potentially damage something in the system and create coil whine in GPU?

How to go about trying to fix the issue?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

The minimum requirements are often inflated by manufacturers, because the manufacturers don't know if you're using a power supply from a reputable brand name or if you're using a Chinese no-name power supply that came with the case which claims it can do 600 watts but in reality it can only do 350-400 watts.

 

The 5700 XT consumes up to 250 watts of power, from the 12v output of your power supply.

The RX 580 consumes up to around 175-225 watts of power from the 12v output of your power supply.

Besides the video card, you have the processor and the motherboard which probably consume up to 100 watts from the 12v output of your power supply and the rest of your components (fans, mechanical hard drives) may consume another 20w or so.

 

Basically, any power supply that can supply at least 250w  + 100w + 25w = 400w (rounded up) on the 12v output would work well with your system.

The Corsair 600w power supply can probably output around 520-550w on 12v so it would be perfectly adequate.

 

The coil whine happens because of an interaction between components, and can't be "transmitted" like a disease to components, and it's not a damage. It's just a natural property or some components which are used in the conversion of electricity, in your case from the 12v of your power supply to the low voltages (0.6v...1.3v) the processor or the video card processor needs.

 

If the input power has a certain quality, a certain shape, and the video card is used within certain parameters that make the voltage converter on the video card work in a specific way, the components called "inductors" that are part of the voltage converter on the video card can vibrate a bit, or resonate, and that's the coil whine you hear.

Inductors are typically glued or covered inside with some material that absorbs vibrations and reduces the noise, so you won't hear coil whine.

 

The coil whine can also happen due to interaction between the voltage converter on the video card with the power supply output.... as a very basic analogy that's not quite correct but close enough, think of it like power supply pumping out energy and video card sucking in energy but they're not sync'ed together all the time, so from time to time the video card tries to suck energy but the power supply isn't ready to pump out energy so video card loses on "breath" of energy ... then a few nanoseconds later the power supply pumps the energy out and there's nobody to take it ... and you get a kind of feedback, a back and forth where the two just can't match well together and this can cause more vibrations in those coils (inductors)

 

Simply changing some video quality settings, enabling vsync or some other functions, basically changing a bit how much power the video card consumes, maybe even overclocking the video card a few Mhz, can make the coil whine be reduced, because that feedback between power supplies is minimized

 

Also keep in mind that the quality of your AC input (the electricity in your house) can affect the quality of the output to components and cause them to coil whine. It could be just random bad luck or coincidence that the quality of AC power in your neighborhood is different over the weekend right now when you test, or something like that.

 

So no, the power supply didn't damage motherboard or video cards, replacement power supplies didn't damage your video card, and the motherboard can't damage the old video cards and make them coil whine.

 

 

edit: also if you hear stuff on the speakers or headphones, move the speakers and headphones cables away from the video card cables (vga, hdmi, dvi)  and maybe move the power cable to another mains socket if you can.

Noise can be picked up by poor quality stereo cable as the video card's voltage converters radiate electric noise, same for the video card cable going to monitor (which should be shielded and not radiate noise but who knows what cable you have)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for taking time to write lengthy reply. It was very informative and took me couple of reads to understand.

 

20 hours ago, mariushm said:

The coil whine happens because of an interaction between components, and can't be "transmitted" like a disease to components, and it's not a damage.

That is great news and relief to know that I didn't accidentally damage components.

 

21 hours ago, mariushm said:

The coil whine can also happen due to interaction between the voltage converter on the video card with the power supply output.... as a very basic analogy that's not quite correct but close enough, think of it like power supply pumping out energy and video card sucking in energy but they're not sync'ed together all the time, so from time to time the video card tries to suck energy but the power supply isn't ready to pump out energy so video card loses on "breath" of energy ... then a few nanoseconds later the power supply pumps the energy out and there's nobody to take it ... and you get a kind of feedback, a back and forth where the two just can't match well together and this can cause more vibrations in those coils (inductors)

Would (in theory) multi rail PSU handle out of sync energy better?
I've read that many people have resolved coil whine with titanium PSU. Can titanium units provide better flow of voltage or why would that happen?

 

21 hours ago, mariushm said:

Simply changing some video quality settings, enabling vsync or some other functions, basically changing a bit how much power the video card consumes, maybe even overclocking the video card a few Mhz, can make the coil whine be reduced, because that feedback between power supplies is minimized

What I've noticed is louder coil whine appears when power consumption is low around 60-80W and high 1000+ FPS. Usually in game menu or exiting Valley benchmark. But also with gaming load then it's more quieter buzzing. So far vsync has been best answer to reduce coil whine.

 

I tried play around with video card power and when I set power limit to -50% coil whine is greatly reduces so is performance unfortunately. GPU clocks and voltages seem dynamic so I'm not sure how would changing that help but i'll give it a try.

 

21 hours ago, mariushm said:

edit: also if you hear stuff on the speakers or headphones, move the speakers and headphones cables away from the video card cables (vga, hdmi, dvi)  and maybe move the power cable to another mains socket if you can.

Noise can be picked up by poor quality stereo cable as the video card's voltage converters radiate electric noise, same for the video card cable going to monitor (which should be shielded and not radiate noise but who knows what cable you have)

That is good to know. Thanks! I meant that coil whine was louder than my speakers usually in silent sneak situations.

There is just one power socket where I sit. So I bought quality power extension cord and take all my power from there - monitor, computer and speakers. I guess I could try to test form other socket but that's not long term solution.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×