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32 GB Ram that shows at 2400 Mhz in Bios

Just like the title says. 32 GB bought from B&H at 3200 Mhz, and it was also on the package specified it shows at 2400 Mhz in Bios. Why is that? I have to enable the XMP profile to run at 3200.

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1 minute ago, Techea said:

Just like the title says. 32 GB bought from B&H at 3200 Mhz, and it was also on the package specified it shows at 2400 Mhz in Bios. Why is that? I have to enable the XMP profile to run at 3200.

2400mhz is not an uncommon Jedec spec. It's better than posting 2133mhz like everyone else! :P

- If it ain't broken, don't fix it! -

- Your post codes and beep codes in the drop down below.

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So in other words it's a bios problem not the memory.

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6 minutes ago, Techea said:

Just like the title says. 32 GB bought from B&H at 3200 Mhz, and it was also on the package specified it shows at 2400 Mhz in Bios. Why is that? I have to enable the XMP profile to run at 3200.

You always have to enable XMP to run most memory, as said above the spec is much lower. You're technically overclocking your RAM.

 

That's how it works.

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From what I saw shopping around recently, most DDR4 ram kits start at 2400mhz now instead of 2133.

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1 minute ago, Taco Annihilator said:

From what I saw shopping around recently, most DDR4 ram kits start at 2400mhz now instead of 2133.

Exactly. Jedec moving up now that memory controllers and AMD adaptation is getting better!

- If it ain't broken, don't fix it! -

- Your post codes and beep codes in the drop down below.

Spoiler

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Dedayog said:

You always have to enable XMP to run most memory, as said above the spec is much lower. You're technically overclocking your RAM.

 

That's how it works.

Now here is the problem with that. We buy memory at 3200 Mhz and pay more for the higher frequency instead of buying the stick at 2400 Mhz with lower price and enable XMP anyway and play with the OC. They basically sell us memory at 2400 Mhz even if we pay for 3200. 

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9 minutes ago, Techea said:

Now here is the problem with that. We buy memory at 3200 Mhz and pay more for the higher frequency instead of buying the stick at 2400 Mhz with lower price and enable XMP anyway and play with the OC. They basically sell us memory at 2400 Mhz even if we pay for 3200. 

Memory doesn't have an innate frequency. There is no "2400 MHz memory" and "3200 MHz memory", there is just memory. The memory controller inside the CPU operates the memory, and it operates it at whatever speed it feels like (or, whatever speed the motherboard BIOS tells it to), the memory itself doesn't control the speed at which it is operated.

 

Motherboard BIOS is generally programmed to run all DDR4 memory at 2133 MHz or 2400 MHz for maximum compatibility, because those are the speeds specified for DDR4 memory in the JEDEC standard, this is to ensure you can at least boot into the system. Some memory can be operated at higher speeds, some can't. But in either case, the memory manufacturer has no control over the speed of operation, so even if they manufacture memory capable of running at 3200 MHz, the most they can do is validate it and label it as "rated for up to 3200 MHz", but there's nothing they can do to make it run at that speed by default, that's up to the board manufacturers.

 

But it doesn't matter anyway, all it means is that you have to enable the speed manually instead of defaulting to it, which isn't a problem. There's none of this imaginary "true 3200 MHz memory" vs "2400 MHz memory overclocked to 3200 MHz". There's just 3200 MHz-rated memory.

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18 minutes ago, Glenwing said:

Memory doesn't have an innate frequency. There is no "2400 MHz memory" and "3200 MHz memory", there is just memory. The memory controller inside the CPU operates the memory, and it operates it at whatever speed it feels like (or, whatever speed the motherboard BIOS tells it to), the memory itself doesn't control the speed at which it is operated.

 

Motherboard BIOS is generally programmed to run all DDR4 memory at 2133 MHz or 2400 MHz for maximum compatibility, because those are the speeds specified for DDR4 memory in the JEDEC standard, this is to ensure you can at least boot into the system. Some memory can be operated at higher speeds, some can't. But in either case, the memory manufacturer has no control over the speed of operation, so even if they manufacture memory capable of running at 3200 MHz, the most they can do is validate it and label it as "rated for up to 3200 MHz", but there's nothing they can do to make it run at that speed by default, that's up to the board manufacturers.

 

But it doesn't matter anyway, all it means is that you have to enable the speed manually instead of defaulting to it, which isn't a problem. There's none of this imaginary "true 3200 MHz memory" vs "2400 MHz memory overclocked to 3200 MHz". There's just 3200 MHz-rated memory.

Ok, that makes more sense now. Good info, thanks.

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