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Is DSP regulation snake oil or does it actually add value to a power supply?

MrZoraman
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I'm shopping for a power supply and some of them are "DSP regulated." I assume that stands for digital signal processing, which sounds like it'd be fancy, but is it actually something that makes the power supply perform better?

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It will make a power supply potentially output a cleaner smoother output voltage, but below some threshold it's debatable if it actually makes a difference for components.

 

For example, the standard says the ripple voltage must be below 120 mV on 12v and below 50mV on 5v if my memory is correct and majority of power supplies with at least 80 plus bronze rating go below 60mV on 12v and below 30mV on 5v.

Higher end models already go below 20mV on 12v and 10mV on 5v and 3.3v. 

A DSP regulated psu may shave a few mV more from those values.

 

From what I heard, lower ripple is a bit better for vrms on video card and processor vrms and lower voltage ripple may give you the ability to squeeze a few Mhz more when you're overclocking a video card, but other than this it really won't make much of a difference so if you're a regular user with regular overclocking (what a regular person would do, adjusting some sliders in afterburner or changing some numbers in bios), having dsp or not won't make any difference to you.

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12 minutes ago, mariushm said:

From what I heard, lower ripple is a bit better for vrms on video card and processor vrms and lower voltage ripple may give you the ability to squeeze a few Mhz more when you're overclocking a video card

The problem is, mobos and GPUs already contain filtering-elements where needed, they are designed to handle the typical ripple.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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Technically that would allow for more precise control over voltage regulation and protections since digital circuits are more precise than analog ones by definition, but it's a question of each specific PSU, not just random one with digital supervisor in it, some of them do perform better than analog competition, some are just on par.

Tag or quote me so i see your reply

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