Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

How to choose a monitor: What information to know, and where to find it.

“Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a life time”

 

The search for a monitor for many people ends in 2 ways:

 

They purchase a monitor seen on a retailer site based purely on specs and advertisements, and are done.

or

They come to a technology forum and ask for advice.

 

The latter usually results in them asking if monitor A or B is best, or what specs they should look for, and then people reply with suggestion usually based on the same advertised specs seen at retailers and/or 1st or 2nd hand subjective opinion.

 

The problem with this is that the display industry has a hidden world of details that are very important for those who want to make an informed purchasing decision, but seldom few ever get to know these details, details that directly relate to the quality of the display and its true capabilities beyond the usual fluff marketing material. These hidden details are known to enthusiasts who know of the few competent, thorough reviewers out there that can provide those details. But being in the minority this results in advice from such individuals possibly being missed by those who need that advice.

 

This is a guide on what information to look for, and where to find it, beyond the basic and often misleading ‘specs’ advertised by the manufacturers, retailers, and many of the self-proclaimed ‘reviewers’ seen online, so that you may make an informed purchasing decision on your own, for the most part.

 

Let’s start off with an important notice:

Any suggestions given to you for any monitor should be accompanied by a thorough tested review source, if it isn’t then such suggestions will be based purely on subjective opinion, often based on specs alone, which, as stated, can and usually are very misleading and missing lots of important information.

 

Now let’s move onto the ‘guide’.

 

Do not rely on advertised specs, and do not compare advertised specs. If its not a reviewed monitor, you're taking a gamble.

As will become evident as you go through this guide and follow the links to reviewers, the advertised specs can be and usually are very misleading. You can use them to glean basic information like resolution, size, frequency, number of ports etc, but things like 'response time' should be taken with a massive grain of salt.

 

Price:

Spoiler

 

The 1st stumbling point anyone looking for a product hits, if you can’t afford it, you can’t get it. So any information after that fact is rather pointless at the time.

 

General rule of thumb price tier (IMO): Values will differ slightly based on currency used.

 

~ £/$100: Any monitor is better than no monitor. They all suck, just get the cheapest.

 

Sub £/$300: Usually not worth the extra price. Very few reviews, limited spec options, and usually significant issues present.

 

£/$300 - £/$400: Dependent on specific requirements some good options start to appear.

 

£/$400 - £/$600: A good budget, A sizable number of reviewed Displays to choose from.

 

£/$600-£/$1000: You will have access to the majority of reviewed monitors by this point. Top end displays for a variety of use cases.

 

£/$1000+: A few extra options appear, high end ultra, and super-ultra-wide predominantly, however quality doesn’t increase.

 

£/$2k+ professional displays. If you’re looking here, you don’t need this guide.

 

A good budget rule of thumb is to hold on to 2x the price of your GPU, to spend on a display. Buying a mid to high end GPU then spending less than £/$300 on a monitor will effectively 'gimp' your experience. Why buy that GPU to crank up details when you can’t appreciate those details due to a crappy monitor?

 

 

Quality:

Spoiler

The LCD Monitor industry is one of compromise.

For the most part quality doesn’t increase with price beyond a certain point, usually around the £/$500 mark.

 

Additionally, there are no ‘all round’ choices; you can’t get a monitor that is both good for productive colour work and competitive gaming at the same time for example.

 

When asking “what is the best monitor for XYZ”, make sure you understand that you can only ask for the best in ONE aspect, not multiple.

 

 

Panel Types:

Spoiler

Associated with the above, panel types dictate the primary aspects you’re going to be looking at.

 

TN:

This is where the competitive gamers should be looking. TN panels have the fastest pixel response times and thus the clearest moving image necessary for fast paced competitive gaming.

 

However, TN panels have the worst image quality, with poor viewing angles, poor black levels, poor contrast, poor uniformity, and in most cases poor colour gamut, coverage, and factory calibration. Don’t expect to be able to enjoy movies or the scenery in games.

 

IPS:

Often touted as the best, IPS has its own issues, however it is most certainly the best choice for colour accurate content creators and professionals. These displays can have very good colour gamut and coverage, they do have the best viewing angles, and they have better contrast levels than TN.

 

However, IPS panels do not do well in dimly lit rooms, their contrast while better than TN usually tops out at around 1100:1 which isn’t great, they also suffer from IPS glow, 2 types arguably:

  • The 1st being a glow from the corners of the screen, an amount that varies from panel to panel, this glow will change as you change your viewing angle and distance, this is how you discern it from traditional LCD back light bleed (BLB).
  • The 2nd being the overall hue and glow from the entire screen when trying to produce black, this is often blueish, this is present on all IPS display regardless.

The other ‘issue’ IPS has is pixel response speed, it is slower than TN, but thankfully nowadays some top end IPS displays have gotten much faster to the point where they are actually usable on 240Hz displays.

 

VA

Arguably the middle ground of LCD display technology. VA has the best contrast and black levels by far, one of the primary reason they are predominantly used in TVs. They can nowadays also come close to your ‘average’ IPS displays level of colour gamut and accuracy.

However, VA displays have significant problems with dark transition pixel response times, all VA panels will have some amount of ‘blur’ / ‘ghosting’ present in dark scenes, and the ‘average’ VA panel monitor will also have some amount of that present in ‘normal’ scenes as well. But there are a few that have managed to get pixel response speed up to a point where you can easily use them for gaming with minimal blur added from the pixel response.

 

 

Uniformity:

Spoiler

A ‘spec’ that is never advertised or seemingly even tested by manufacturers.

 

Uniformity is very important for the quality of the display but is way more often than not, terrible in monitors.

Uniformity is a measurement of the difference in the light passing through the panel from the backlight from one area of the screen to the next when trying to produce a solid even color across the entire screen.

 

A poor uniformity means that when trying to display a flat solid colour, it will in fact look different from one part of the screen to another. This is especially important when looking at whites and blacks.

Blacks are heavily impacted by BLB, and in the case of IPS panels IPS glow, a poor black uniformity will make dark scenes of any content look terrible.

 

Conversely a poor white uniformity while not as noticeable can make bright scenes look oddly coloured in areas where the uniformity is bad. The most noticeable effect of poor white uniformity is vignetting around the edges of the screen. (edges seem darker)

 

Displays with FALD (full array local dimming) will have better black uniformity when this feature is enabled as the backlight will not show up any uniformity issues in the areas the backlight is off.

 

The gold standard today for black uniformity are OLED TV’s , black areas are black because there is no backlight.

 

 

Pixel response speed (Response time):

Spoiler

Sometimes mistaken for input latency (input lag), this is a measure of how fast a pixel can transition from one shade/brightness to another.

The faster it is the less added blur you will see from one frame to another.

 

I say ‘added’ blur because there is an innate presence of blur called ‘persistence blur’ that comes from the ‘sample and hold’ technique used by modern displays. Each frame is produced then held for the entire duration of the frequency the display is refreshing at, when tracking a moving object, the human eye/brain will fill in the gap between each frame (blur). As such, the higher the frequency the more information your eyes have and the less persistence blur you will see.

 

The way to reduce or even remove this blur further is to flicker the screen, add a black frame between each frame, this has the effect of adding extra information or rather separating each frame from each other, reducing the blur between each frame. This is why even an OLED TV with near instant pixel response speed, will still display some amount of blur, though far far less than the vast majority of LCDs.

 

However, pixel response speeds are usually the dominant factor in the amount of blur present in LCD displays.

 

Pixel response specs advertised by manufacturer have to be taken with a big grain of salt. They are a cheery picked figure from a single transition often among as many as 30, all of which are important.

 

The measurement of pixel response time is usually done in 2 different ways:

 

  • A full transition measurement 0% to 100%. In effect like timing a runner doing the 100-meter sprint, you time from start to the finish line.
  • A 10% to 90% measurement. In effect like timing that same runner but only include the 10-meter mark to the 90-meter mark.

 

The reason the 2nd measurement is done is because the 10% to 90% period is where most of the transition is taking place and thus by the time 90% of the transition is done, your eyes will be seeing the majority of what that pixel is intending you to see. But not all mind you.

 

The 10%-90% measurement is industry standard, however reviewers can also include the full transition measurement as well in their reviews as it can be used to include overshoot,

Overshoot is usually caused by too high a 'Overdrive' setting, and overdrive is always used at its maximum level when manufacturers cherry pick their response time figure.

 

‘Overdrive’ much like it sounds, increases the speed of the transition BUT by doing so makes it harder for the pixels to hit their intended mark.

It’s like adding NOS to a car, or a turbo kit and not upgrading the breaks.

 

When overdrive is enabled at its highest setting, this often results in ‘overshoot’ where the pixel goes past its intended target and has to come back down in brightness, this when viewed results in an inverse ghosting effect where the ‘blur’ is a lighter colour rather than a darker colour.

 

It is arguably more distracting than normal blur. This added time to compensate for overshoot is of course not included in the 10% to 90% test as the test stops at 90% of the way to the target and doesn’t measure the point where it hits the 100% point, goes past it by any amount, be it 10% or 250%, and back down to the original target, thus making the advertised response time spec even more unreliable.

 

As of this time, using 'usable' overdrive settings where possible, TN panels can get closest to 1ms, but their ‘average’ across all transitions, will not be 1ms, it will be closer to 2ms to 4ms depending on the exact measurement being used by the reviewer (often both).

IPS will be around the 4ms to 8ms mark

VA will be around the 5ms to 12ms mark.

 

To finalize this point, you could purchase 10 different models all advertising 1ms response times, and when viewed, each will not only behave differently in regards to amount of blur you see, but when tested will also all have different response time averages slower than 1ms.

 

 

Input lag:

Spoiler

Often confused with response time. Input lag is the time it takes for a given input to be displayed on screen.

 

For the most part, monitors, especially gaming monitors, will all have input latency figures plenty fast enough for even the most dedicated competitive gamer.

 

Input lag is measured by measuring the time between an input like a mouse click, and the time it takes for that input to display in the centre of the screen. As each frame on screen is drawn from top to bottom, the fastest possible input latency figure is HALF the frame time frequency of the display. So the fastest a 144Hz display can be in terms of input latency is 3.47ms.

 

However, if you see an input lag figure that is below half the frame time of the display, you can safely assume ether a mistake was made or they are only counting the additional processing time and not the half frame time.

 

As such, an input lag figure of 2ms on a 144Hz screen can be assumed to be 2ms of added processing time on top of the 3.47ms minimum time needed for the frame to display an input in the centre of the screen. While an input lag of 2.6ms on a 240Hz display can be assumed to include both half frame time and added processing time.

 

The reviewer doing the testing will use a standardised way, so you won’t have to ‘guess’’ which way it is being done.

Generally speaking with monitors anything below 10ms is good, and most monitors achieve this.

 

 

Colour gamut and coverage:

This is a section I will not be getting into.

The simple reason being that if it’s an important aspect to you, you should already know everything that needs to be known for your given hobby or profession.

 

For the vast majority of people you won't need to know what things like the Adobe-RGB coverage or DCI-P3 coverage mean and are used for.

It is however tested for by most competent reviewers and so you can look there if interested.

 

Colour Accuracy:

As with above this is most important for professionals and certain hobbyists, however this is still somewhat relevant for everyone in my opinion.

Spoiler

It is rather simple, factory calibration for most monitors is poor. This means most people right now are not seeing the games they play and the movies they watch, as intended by the creator.

 

How far off the image is depends on the individual display as every single monitor will have a slightly different factory calibration. This is why you shouldn’t just download a ICC calibration profile from another person or review site.

 

The best way to calibrate your monitor is to buy a cheap calibration tool like a X-rite i1 Display Pro or Spyder5 pro. They cost around £/$180 which is very cheap in terms of calibrators and can be used to create a windows ICC colour profile that will ensure your monitors are calibrated to whatever accuracy you desire. You can also use this device to manually adjust other displays like TVs.

 

Should you buy one of these calibrators it is suggested that you don’t use the included software, DisplayCAL is an open source free software that is generally considered to be superior to the included software.

 

In a review a higher 'Delta-E' figure means a worse calibration. below 3 is good. below 2 is ideal. A custom calibration using a device like above can get below 1.

In regards to gamma measurements, the target is usually 2.2, this its not a delta/error figure.

 

 

HDR and SDR:

Spoiler

HDR is a relatively new spec, it describes a displays ability to produce the extended color gamut and volume, and brightness required to make images really pop and look closer to real life than is/was traditionally possible with SDR.

 

The number one problem with HDR however is that it is really not truly available in mainstream consumer monitors.

Very very few monitors can produce the brightness required for even basic HDR, fewer still for the full HDR experience.

You also see very few monitors with the extended color gamut requirements needed for HDR, namely DCI-P3 at 90% , no monitors bar very very expensive professional studio monitors, can actually hit the needed full HDR spec targets,

 

An effective 'HDR ready' is the closest you can expect, they 'can' most certainly look better than your average monitor but they will not come close to true HDR as seen in TVs, and the level of HDR available will vary from model to model, some will barely be any different form SDR, others will be noticeably better, but none will be the true experience.

 

 

 

Where to look:

 

Now that we have gone through some of the most important 'hidden' aspects of Monitors, where do you find this information ?

 

As mentioned, reviewers. However, you will need to find those who test objectively, display the results, and ideally also inform you of their testing methodology so you can compare displays across different reviewers.

 

Here are a few places you can check.

Spoiler

 

Rtings.com

 

These guys have the best site I have come across so far for display reviews. They have a search and filter tool, and you can even create your own rating system so that new reviews are automatically added to your table and arranged in accordance with what specific test results and specs are important to you. Their website is easy to navigate and has all the information you want to know on each of the tests they do, include how they test.

 

They have about 100 monitors and 80 TVs in their catalogue so far, not much when compared to the number available to consumers to buy, but they can only do so much as they buy every display from retailers so that they dont get cherry picked preview samples.

 

The following link is to my custom rating profile.

https://www.rtings.com/user/ratings/ABkArd5QEMduIA

 

Tftcentral.co.uk

 

Equal in testing accuracy to Rtings, however their sites search function is broken so it’s harder to navigate. They are also slower to review displays.

 

Pcmonitors.info

 

Like tftcentral, they to have a solid testing method and reviews. However once again their site doesn’t have as robust a search feature and they can confuse some viewers with their ‘articles’ which talk about new and upcoming monitors but are not actual reviews.

 

Hardware Unboxed youtube channel

 

This channel does sufficiently well in reviews when compared to most other youtube channels, however they only include a limited number of tests, thankfully the important ones, for example pixel response time, are included. Being a youtube channel there is only a basic search function, they have no website so written reviews are not available.

 

 

Why isn’t LTT included?

I like LTT as much as the next person, however, when it comes to display reviews they lack details, and are for the most part halfway between a ‘overviewer’ and a proper ‘reviewer’.

Some of their videos will include information like colour accuracy and gamuts, they may even attempt a basic ‘blur’ amount test, but they are not currently at the level of Rtings or Hardware Unboxed. If you see a monitor on a LTT video and you think it looks good, I would still suggest you check the above sources first before purchasing.

 

 

TVs as a monitor?

This ‘guide’ isn’t for TVs however a quick word on them

Spoiler

Yes, you can use a TV.

No, there is no big difference in technology.

No, they won’t damage your eyes.

Yes, TVs tend to have a higher input lag even in ‘game mode’. But for the most part it isn’t a big enough figure to cause issue.

Yes, most LCD TVs use VA panels and as such pixel response is slower, thus they do have an amount of blur. This along with the input latency, means they are not recommended for competitive gaming.

Yes, OLED is an exception.

 

OLED TV’s overcome almost every issue that LCDs have, they are potentially great even for competitive gaming. Though 120Hz is the current cap, they do not suffer added blur from slow pixel response. They even have BFI to reduce persistence blur, so a 120hz OLED can have clearer motion than potentially even a 240Hz LCD Monitor. Do you want a blurrier 240Hz monitor or a clearer 120Hz OLED?

 

BUT they are huge, 55” is until very very soon, the smallest option, LG is making a 48” available this year. And of course there is the so called ‘burn-in’ issue to deal with.

Yes, it can happen, yes, you will have to work around it.

 

The final issue with OLED is price. £/$1000 minimum for an older model, £/$1500 for a new model.

But they are currently the best displays available in the display industry, beating out even £/$1000+ monitors in every aspect but max frequency and their size issue.

 

 

 

Why should you trust the above information to be true?

 

Display manufacturers are tight lipped when it comes to specific information about their displays that are not included in their advertisement material. And for good reason, no one wants potential customers to know the faults of their products.

 

However, statements like "the response time spec is massively misleading" can be tested, and has been. Every reviewer who tests pixel response speed comes out with an average pixel response speed that is different from the advertised specs, some even go so far as to try and replicate the advertised spec, and that is where we find out how the manufacturers get away with advertising these figures. They are 'technically' not a lie, just hugely misleading.

 

This is the same for all the above information, reviewers that have shown their testing method can confirm all the tested information they have gathered and it can be replicated, within panel variance, and thus confirmed to be true.

 

With the above information in hand, and links to a few reviewers where further more detailed information can be found, you should have all you need to make an informed purchasing decision when looking for a monitor.

 

 

 

If anyone thinks I should add any information to this post, do feel free to speak up.

 

Thanks to @Glenwing for help with format and error checking.

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/12/2020 at 1:19 PM, SolarNova said:

As mentioned, reviewers. However, you will need to find those who test objectively, display the results, and ideally also inform you of their testing methodology so you can compare displays across different reviewers.

This is a good reason why I take a month or two for before purchasing some new products. This method should be used for many other products and can help prevent buyers remorse.👍  

Gaming With a 4:3 CRT

System specs below

 

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600X with a Noctua NH-U9S cooler 
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 Aorus m
RAM: 16GB (2 x 8GB) of DDR4 GEIL Potenza Evo at 3200Mhz
GPU: EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC Blower Card
HDD: 7200RPM TOSHIBA DT01ACA100 1TB, External HDD: 5400RPM 2TB WD My Passport
SSD: NONE, eveything works fine, no need to upgrade, stop telling me I need an SSD.
PSU: Corsair CX650M
Displays: ViewSonic VA2012WB LCD 1680x1050p @ 75Hz,
Gateway VX920 CRT: 1920x1440@65Hz, 1600x1200@75Hz, 1200x900@100Hz, 960x720@125Hz
Gateway VX900 CRT: 1920x1440@64Hz, 1600x1200@75Hz, 1200x900@100Hz, 960x720@120Hz
(Yes, I use a CRT and I prefer gaming on one)
 
Cooling: Grill with filter installed onto the front panel for air intake cooling with a 120mm Corsair ML120 fan and an old recycled 92mm cooler master(forgot model) fan for exhaust.
 
Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS MEKA PRO with Cherry MX Red switches
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
question i want to buy a monitor that has 1440p and 144hz i was thing AOC Q27G2U/BK is this a good monitor i dont want to spend to much. also is the Phillips E-line 276E8VJSB a good 4k monitor.
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Assasingreed said:
question i want to buy a monitor that has 1440p and 144hz i was thing AOC Q27G2U/BK is this a good monitor i dont want to spend to much. also is the Phillips E-line 276E8VJSB a good 4k monitor.

You best course of action is to follow the guide above, once u have found a few options ,that have reviews available ,that ur ok with, make a new thread and ask for opinions on the options u have found.

 

Remember, without a review of the monitors you choose, any choice made will be on specs alone, which inst the best course of action as explained above.

 

Make sure to link the reviews ur using to pick the options so people can help compare them.

 

I cant comment on the AOC display of the top of my head and I see no thorough reviews at a quick glance. If u have found one make sure to link it in ur thread.

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

This makes monitor purchase almost impossible with out seeing it in person.  What I have found so far is most sites like Amazon lack the needed info for picking good displays. Plus reviewers tend to lean either on the high end  144hz 1440 50inch 1ms ips Gsync RGB bla bla bl pannels or they go for bang for the buck $200 dollar options.  Also I notice that everything seems to be centered around FPS gaming and Usually never accounts for the people that play MMO's or people that don't care if there may be a slight delay if that means that the picture and panel looks amazing.  I would gladly make that trade any day. 

 

Monitors and TV seem to be one of the hardest decisions to make when it comes to buying peripherals and the manufacturers dont make it any easier with there naming like PC218jklmnop-lc Gaming. Because you can do all the do diligence you want by going to a review site but when it comes time to purchase and you go to type in the one you seen on the review you may not get the model you are looking for because it has a P, W, Q at the end and now you got an out dated version or your shown the more expensive option. 

 

So if any there any manufactures reading this please can you just name your panels something normal. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, ELSknutson said:

and Usually never accounts for the people that play MMO's or people that don't care if there may be a slight delay if that means that the picture and panel looks amazing.  I would gladly make that trade any day.

Rtings has pretty decent selection of different kind of monitors and they have an amazing table tool to search for monitors. It does take some time to learn how to use it, mostly to learn the names of the filters you want to use. Thankfully you can find them pretty easily from any of the reviews they have on the site.

https://www.rtings.com/monitor/tools/table

 

They also have a lots of articles where they recommend monitors.

https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/best

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Sooo from what I've figured now my dream of an 1440p/144hz Monitor with propper HDR is pretty much dead and I should rather buy one Monitor with a high refresh rate and one Monitor(or TV) With greate colors/HDR?

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, alovarosa said:

Sooo from what I've figured now my dream of an 1440p/144hz Monitor with propper HDR is pretty much dead and I should rather buy one Monitor with a high refresh rate and one Monitor(or TV) With greate colors/HDR?

Bluntly..... Yes.

 

The closest u can get at present is LG CX 48" OLED, which runs 120hz 4k, VRR, BFI, and HDR.

For many though its still too big at 48" and most are unwilling to make the small habitual changes necessary to look after a OLED.

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, SolarNova said:

Bluntly..... Yes.

 

The closest u can get at present is LG CX 48" OLED, which runs 120hz 4k, VRR, BFI, and HDR.

For many though its still too big at 48" and most are unwilling to make the small habitual changes necessary to look after a OLED.

Thanks for your response :).
Okay since 48" is way to big for me as Monitor I guess I gonna stick with 2 Sepperate Monitors or a Monitor and a TV, I gonna look into that with the information you kindly provided in this tutorial.
Last question if I may.
If you talk about "Habitual changes necessarry to look after an OLED" doesn't that basically just mean I have to prepare for screen burn in? So basically I'd make "Habitual changes" by installing a sort of screen saver (uhh, oldschool) or just simply turning my Monitor/TV Off while not using it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, alovarosa said:

If you talk about "Habitual changes necessarry to look after an OLED" doesn't that basically just mean I have to prepare for screen burn in? So basically I'd make "Habitual changes" by installing a sort of screen saver (uhh, oldschool) or just simply turning my Monitor/TV Off while not using it?

Indeed, there are many threads in here where people give tips on how to minimize the chance of a burn-in.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, alovarosa said:

If you talk about "Habitual changes necessarry to look after an OLED" doesn't that basically just mean I have to prepare for screen burn in? So basically I'd make "Habitual changes" by installing a sort of screen saver (uhh, oldschool) or just simply turning my Monitor/TV Off while not using it?

Pritty much.

 

OLEDs pixel degradation is cumulative, so its more a case of reducing the amount of total time the same image is displayed over and over again.

Like for example a game UI, or a fully expanded Browser window, or Icons on ur desktop and the windows taskbar and desktop background image.

 

You can work around this with some simple changes.

Hide taskbar, screensaver, animated or changing desktop background, hiding icons or adding transparency. ('Wallpaper Engine' does most of this) and for browser windows, just dont open them up in fullscreen , manually expand them and shift them around each time u open it.

 

For games u just try to limit static UI's, especially high contrast ones, hide them, change their size often, and ideally just don't play the same game for 6+ hours a day every day for years (like streamers do). So long as ur games are varied pixel degradation should be relatively uniform so ull avoid 'screen burn'.

 

I still use a Plasma so i do all this myself, and its become second nature, its my habitual use now , i dont notice im doing it most of the time.

 

OLED 'burn-in' isnt like 'real' burn in from the CRT and Plasma days, u can play fortnight, for example, for 24 hours straight, so long as u leave the OLED to go through its pixel refresh cycle, u wont find any burn in the next day. But if u keep doing that every day, it will degrade over time fro the cumulative degradation rather than immediate permanent damage.

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to buy a second monitor. My main has 240hz and Gsync. What specs do I need on the other one to not have issues with stuttering/downregulate refreshers etc?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

What about RGB vs BGR subpixel layout? Does this matter as much as some people on reddit seem to think? OS's are macOS and Ubuntu, we are a Windows free household. GPUs are AMD for Ubuntu and Intel for the macs. Seems like everything over 40 inches is BGR. Will this make for blurry or jagged text on the macs in particular? It looks like I can set the Ubuntu to BGR in conf, but will this actually correct the issue?

 

The monitor in question is the LG 43UN700-B 42.5-inch 4K UHD IPS Monitor

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, ReganCACS said:

What about RGB vs BGR subpixel layout? Does this matter as much as some people on reddit seem to think? OS's are macOS and Ubuntu, we are a Windows free household. GPUs are AMD for Ubuntu and Intel for the macs. Seems like everything over 40 inches is BGR. Will this make for blurry or jagged text on the macs in particular? It looks like I can set the Ubuntu to BGR in conf, but will this actually correct the issue?

 

The monitor in question is the LG 43UN700-B 42.5-inch 4K UHD IPS Monitor

 

 

Text clarity on displays with 'odd' subpixel layouts is somewhat a OS issue. In windows for example it is designed to work with RGB layouts and as such BGR and WBGR layouts result in text being less clear at smaller text sizes that heavily rely on 2 pixel width font.

For example the Lg 48" OLED uses WBGR and Windows font at 100% native scaling doesnt look to great, however at larger font sizes resulting from scaling at 150% and 300% text is much more legible as its able to utilize more pixels (3 - 4) to make a solid black line for a letter.

Windows cleartype however I htink it looks worse.

https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/lg/48-cx-oled

 

I have no experience with MacOS or Ubunto so i have no idea how it would handle such displays.

 

Without a review testing the specifc model ur looking to use, I have no more information on it than you.

 

That said rtings do have a review up of a BGR display, namely the Phillips Momentum. It shows some crosshatching, but its not as bad a Lgs WBGR layout.

https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/philips/momentum-436m6vbpab

 

In the end ull just have to see it in person to make ur decision.

 

 

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Hello

 

I am in need of a new but budget monitor for 2D/3D animation, graphic design and coding.

My budget is around 250-350€

It needs to have IPS panel, some type of HDR, ideally 4K and adjustable stand is a must. Pivot would be nice too.

 

Please, help me find the right one.

 

Thank you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in Canada first of all and I got to ask is there any affordable option for 4k monitors in the $350 to $400 + tax range?  Is there anything anyone would recommend?  Only places I would buy from right now are Newegg.ca, BestBuy.ca and Amazon.ca as I actually want to get my monitor and these places have delivered things on time when I have ordered from them in the past few months.  Btw I don't care about 144 FPS as I want picture quality more.  Also the video card that would be driving my pc is an RX 5700 XT so I guess Free-Sync matters?  All I know is I have done some shopping and haven't been able to decide on anything.  I did look at the following monitor but can't figure out what kind of panel it has ...

 https://www.newegg.ca/p/N82E16824236825?Item=N82E16824236825

I assume this is a TN panel and I want to avoid this at all costs if possible.

Oh and one other thing is when trying to pick out a monitor I am trying to avoid what I got with this LG tv I am using for a monitor and that is 1080p likes like garbage on it.  I had a previous tv that did not have this issue but that was then and this is now. : S   As for purchasing a new tv I looked into it but don't like the idea of getting locked in to pay for something for awhile.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, idontlikephysx said:

I am in Canada first of all and I got to ask is there any affordable option for 4k monitors in the $350 to $400 + tax range?  Is there anything anyone would recommend?  Only places I would buy from right now are Newegg.ca, BestBuy.ca and Amazon.ca as I actually want to get my monitor and these places have delivered things on time when I have ordered from them in the past few months.  Btw I don't care about 144 FPS as I want picture quality more.  Also the video card that would be driving my pc is an RX 5700 XT so I guess Free-Sync matters?  All I know is I have done some shopping and haven't been able to decide on anything.  I did look at the following monitor but can't figure out what kind of panel it has ...

 https://www.newegg.ca/p/N82E16824236825?Item=N82E16824236825

I assume this is a TN panel and I want to avoid this at all costs if possible.

Oh and one other thing is when trying to pick out a monitor I am trying to avoid what I got with this LG tv I am using for a monitor and that is 1080p likes like garbage on it.  I had a previous tv that did not have this issue but that was then and this is now. : S   As for purchasing a new tv I looked into it but don't like the idea of getting locked in to pay for something for awhile.

IMO you shouldnt be looking at 4k with a 5700XT driving it.

 

1440p would be a better suite and give you more options to look at.

 

Here is a link to my ratings profile on rtings. See what catches your eye.

 

https://www.rtings.com/user/ratings/ABkArd5QEMduIA

CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

Link to post
Share on other sites

Monitor is a personal preference.  I have yet to find a TN panel I like and some people refuse to use VA for smearing or IPS for "IPS glow". See and test if if you can just know the showroom floor is a different experience than in the home.  I let my guard down with TN thinking they improved enough looking at it in store and regretted it when I used it at home.

AMD 5900X / Gigabyte X570 Auros Pro / 32GB @ 3600c16 / 1TB Samsung 980 Pro 4.0x4 / 4TB total Inland TLC 3.0x4 / EVGA FTW3 3080 / Corsair RM750x /Thermaltake View71

Custom water loop EK Vector AM4, D5 pump, Coolstream 420 radiator

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I'm glad you link this for everyone, but it's a very confusing way of portraying the monitors. The average person does not need to know all about which budgets contain which monitors (everyone knows that more expensive=better and that 500$ is the best balance) and most people know what pixel response time and input lag is, and you link this post to people who are just looking for a recommendation, not a wikipedia article about monitors.

I recommend just updating this with recommendations in each budget and resolution+refresh rate.

 

For example 450$ = Dell s2721DGF (Nano-ips) (165Hz)

Alternative 400$ = LG 27GN750 (Nano-ips (144Hz) (sRgb mode)

etc.

 

As it now stands, this post is useless for the 70% of people finding this after you link it in their recommendation post.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×