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Help to understand trace route, private IP blow external IP's

Joveice
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Hello, I'm no network expert so I wonder what this private IP does below an ISP IP.

(I where doing debugging on high latency issues for a game)

See the list below, what does that private IP

Tracing route to api.bethesda.net [143.204.51.87]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.0.0.1
  2     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  193.75.36.1
  3     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  10.130.7.53 <-- this one
  4     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  62.63.63.166
  5     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  62.63.63.165
  6     2 ms     2 ms     5 ms  195.0.241.184
  7    16 ms    16 ms    20 ms  193.90.113.18
  8    24 ms    23 ms    31 ms  193.90.113.16
  9    23 ms    30 ms    28 ms  195.0.244.234
 10    27 ms    29 ms    24 ms  99.82.177.28
 11    24 ms    24 ms    24 ms  52.93.138.122
 12    23 ms    23 ms    24 ms  52.93.138.237
 13     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 14     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 15     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 16     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 17     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 18    23 ms    23 ms    23 ms  143.204.51.87

I'm on a class A network, but I have no clue what 10.130.7.53 is, nor does it respond to any pings (ping command)
Shouldn't I be outside my network after the jump to 193.75.36.1?

Back-end developer, electronics "hacker"

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Probably just an internal bounce within an internet exchange.

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22 hours ago, Master Disaster said:

Probably just an internal bounce within an internet exchange.

For a non network tech dude, what does that really mean?

Back-end developer, electronics "hacker"

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3 hours ago, Joveice said:

For a non network tech dude, what does that really mean?

When you connect to your ISP you go through a DNS (usually hosted in a data centre/internet exchange), its the DNS server that converts the URL you entered into an IP address that can be routed to the server hosting the website you're trying to access. When your router goes outside of its local network it will always go to your ISPs DNS first.

 

What I think was happening was your router was connecting to the DNS, the DNS then forwarded you to another server hosted in the same exchange on a different subnet and the second server handled the address translation. Each time you're sent to a new server its called a bounce. Basically your packet was bounced from one subnet to a different subnet within the same network.

 

That's just a guess though, I could be totally wrong.

Main Rig:-

Ryzen 7 3800X | Asus ROG Strix X570-F Gaming | 16GB Team Group Dark Pro 3600Mhz | Corsair MP600 1TB PCIe Gen 4 | Sapphire 5700 XT Pulse | Corsair H115i Platinum | WD Black 1TB | WD Green 4TB | EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650W | Asus TUF GT501 | Samsung C27HG70 1440p 144hz HDR FreeSync 2 | Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS |

 

Server:-

Intel NUC running Server 2019 + Synology DSM218+ with 2 x 4TB Toshiba NAS Ready HDDs (RAID0)

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3 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

When you connect to your ISP you go through a DNS (usually hosted in a data centre/internet exchange), its the DNS server that converts the URL you entered into an IP address that can be routed to the server hosting the website you're trying to access. When your router goes outside of its local network it will always go to your ISPs DNS first.

 

What I think was happening was your router was connecting to the DNS, the DNS then forwarded you to another server hosted in the same exchange on a different subnet and the second server handled the address translation. Each time you're sent to a new server its called a bounce. Basically your packet was bounced from one subnet to a different subnet within the same network.

 

That's just a guess though, I could be totally wrong.

Okey, thanks for the explaination anyways!

Back-end developer, electronics "hacker"

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