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What kind of lamp is this and how do I change it?

In the new apartment my wife and I moved in to have this ceiling lamp installed. It’s been censor activated but we’ve never figured out where the censor actually is or what kind of censor it is.
 

Few months ago the lamp stopped turning on, so we assume it’s defect of something. But we don’t know how to swap the LED’s or if that’s what’s needed at all. 
 

Didn’t really know if this was a topic for the forum, but I took a chance on it. 

5C28591D-DD12-4E32-A2F5-B4AB8742AA6F.jpeg

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typically the first thing to fail in an LED light assembly is the power source not the leds, so you might see about trying to find a replacement for the white box at the top.  If you have a multimeter you could try probing the wires between the controller box (with the circle and green LED) and the power box to see if motion sends some kind of signal. Do you think you could post a better picture of just the power and control boxes?

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36 minutes ago, FezBoy said:

typically the first thing to fail in an LED light assembly is the power source not the leds

The last thing to fail is LEDs. I've never had an LED fail on me (not even an overclocked one)

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if im seeing that right the switch on the wall will be the sender and the motion sensor

the box that has the pins on it it is the reciever. you can bypass that by completely removing it and direct wire the other box to the power strip but the power going to it needs to be ran by a switch also or you will never shut it off

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5 minutes ago, circeseye said:

if im seeing that right the switch on the wall will be the sender and the motion sensor

the box that has the pins on it it is the reciever. you can bypass that by completely removing it and direct wire the other box to the power strip but the power going to it needs to be ran by a switch also or you will never shut it off

The white box labeled "merrytek" is the motion sensor, you can find it here: https://www.merrytek.com/sale-7590840-ip20-on-off-dimmable-motion-sensor-for-ceiling-lamp-tri-proof-light.html

 

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Not an electrician, but seems like the sensor is getting power at least. As others pointed out, LEDs usually don't fail so it's either the sensor or the LED driver. From the picture, the LED driver is YAMENG 18W450. The power comes into the sensor and from the sensor to the LED driver. You can try measuring voltage at the sensor out (don't forget to wave so it has a chance to switch on), it varies around the world but should be 220Vac or 230Vac. You should also hear a click when the relay in the sensor switches on the output. If there is no voltage or a click, the sensor is dead. As a sanity check, you can also measure the input, it should be the same. Then you need to measure the voltage on the LED driver output, it seems like there are 4 strips in series and they are usually 12Vdc so 48Vdc for the 4 strips. The driver output goes only up to 42Vdc, so they might be 5V and that would comfortably fit within the driver parameters but what do I know :D It's ok if there isn't zero.

 

You can also test the LED driver by bypassing the sensor altogether. Just be safe and work work with the wires only if the breaker is OFF. If you are unsure, don't do anything and leave it to a professional.

 

You can buy another LED driver or a sensor, there are even units that have sensor integrated with a driver, just check the voltage, current and/or power parameters before buying.

 

Clarification on the sensor in there, this looks more like it: https://www.merrytek.com/sale-7536152-tuv-certification-microwave-motion-sensor-movement-detector-for-lighting.html

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5 hours ago, redteam4ever said:

Not an electrician, but seems like the sensor is getting power at least. As others pointed out, LEDs usually don't fail so it's either the sensor or the LED driver. From the picture, the LED driver is YAMENG 18W450. The power comes into the sensor and from the sensor to the LED driver. You can try measuring voltage at the sensor out (don't forget to wave so it has a chance to switch on), it varies around the world but should be 220Vac or 230Vac. You should also hear a click when the relay in the sensor switches on the output. If there is no voltage or a click, the sensor is dead. As a sanity check, you can also measure the input, it should be the same. Then you need to measure the voltage on the LED driver output, it seems like there are 4 strips in series and they are usually 12Vdc so 48Vdc for the 4 strips. The driver output goes only up to 42Vdc, so they might be 5V and that would comfortably fit within the driver parameters but what do I know :D It's ok if there isn't zero.

 

You can also test the LED driver by bypassing the sensor altogether. Just be safe and work work with the wires only if the breaker is OFF. If you are unsure, don't do anything and leave it to a professional.

 

You can buy another LED driver or a sensor, there are even units that have sensor integrated with a driver, just check the voltage, current and/or power parameters before buying.

 

Clarification on the sensor in there, this looks more like it: https://www.merrytek.com/sale-7536152-tuv-certification-microwave-motion-sensor-movement-detector-for-lighting.html

220vac? nooooo thats a 110 volt

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On 5/6/2020 at 5:04 AM, circeseye said:

220vac? nooooo thats a 110 volt

If you look at the biggest grey Nordlux sticker it says 220-240V. Along with CE mark which indicates it's sold in EU. A little Google search "nordlux 7886" led me to the lamp type and consequently to the manufacturer's website - this is a Nordlux Melo 34 lamp. You can check the datasheet, it also lists 230V as voltage: https://www.nordlux.com/products/product/63246001

Edited by redteam4ever
typo in Google query

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7 minutes ago, redteam4ever said:

If you look at the biggest grey Nordlux sticker it says 220-240V. Along with CE mark which indicates it's sold in EU. A little Google search "nordlux 7886" led me to the lamp type and consequently to the manufacturer's website - this is a Nordlux Melo 34 lamp. You can check the datasheet, it also lists 230V as voltage: https://www.nordlux.com/products/product/63246001

dammmnnn....looking at it i would never guess its 220. those gage wires to that little block then smaller gage after.

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