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Do i need to convert my drive to GPT when install windows 10 ?

Go to solution Solved by 222feb23,

thanks for all the advises, install windows 10 yesterday with ssd converted to GPT, then install normally no problem, no problem when using the windows too  

Do i need to convert my drive to GPT when install windows 10 because when i watch some videos about install windows 10, some of it said i need to and some just install without convert anything ?

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Win 10 also works on MBR drives

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Your Windows installer will figure that out automatically.

If you have a linux partition on that drive you should not install windows because it WILL break your Linux install. I don't remember how but it is fixable.

If you can, always install Windows first, then Linux.

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11 minutes ago, 222feb23 said:

Do i need to convert my drive to GPT when install windows 10 because when i watch some videos about install windows 10, some of it said i need to and some just install without convert anything ?

No but if your system is UEFI compliant then you will want GPT as it allows Windows to install in UEFI mode which enables secure boot, fast boot and some other stuff. In 2020 there's no reason to not use GPT TBH, MBR is long deprecated and Windows only still supports it for legacy reasons.

 

3 minutes ago, euviridis said:

for most use case, mbr is fine.

 

I'd love to be proven wrong though

If you want to Install Windows on a 2TB or bigger drive then GPT (or more accurately GUID) is required. Also MBR only allows a small number of partitions on a drive (I forget the exact amount), GUID allows for up to 128 partitions on one drive plus there's no need to differentiate between Primary & Extended partitions on GUID. Finally its much easier to fix a broken EFI bootloader than it is an MBR one.

 

8 minutes ago, GER_T4IGA said:

Your Windows installer will figure that out automatically.

If you have a linux partition on that drive you should not install windows because it WILL break your Linux install. I don't remember how but it is fixable.

If you can, always install Windows first, then Linux.

Boot from your Linux installer in recovery mode then do sudo grub-update

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Well, actually is much easier to fix legacy boot problems than UEFI. MBR boot and system may be the same partition (just single partition on the drive) and Windows fix boot usually works when something goes wrong with bcd. There are tools like EasyBCD that are very helpful, but... Fact is that using GPT is recommended and sometimes boot can be faster than legacy (depends how good bios is written - I noticed that MSI have some issues with fast boot on newer motherboards).

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If you do not plan to install another operating system side-by-side with your Windows 10 I would go GPT and UEFI boot since in most cases it boots faster. Yet we are talking about several seconds since Windows 10 boots pretty quick anyways. 

If you are going to experiment with other operating systems like Linux of any flavor or plan to upgrade hardware or disk drives, cloning or virtualizing your existing Windows installation I would stick to MBR since as already mentioned above it's much easier to fix if it has some boot-up issues. 

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thanks for all the advises, install windows 10 yesterday with ssd converted to GPT, then install normally no problem, no problem when using the windows too  

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