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How to connect up my power supply

Wobblycogs
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I've just bought the parts for a new machine, this is my first build in over a decade so things have changed a bit and I could do with some help! I'm going through the manuals while I wait for everything to show up and I've become a little confused.

 

First the components...

Power Supply: Corsair RM750

Motherboard: Asus X570-F --> 24 pin ATX connector and 8 + 4 EPS12V conectors

Graphics Card: https://www.gigabyte.com/uk/Graphics-Card/GV-N207SGAMING-OC-8GC#kf --> 8 + 6 PCIe power connectors

 

The manual for the motherboard says it'll run with just the 8 pin EPS12V connector but implies you're better off with both the 8 and 4 pin connectors populated. The spec on the Corsair site states that there's a single EPS12V connector but that seems to be wrong. The review of the RM750 on Toms states the supply has 2 * 4+4 EPS12V connectors (which all the retailers state as well) so I think the specification on the Corsair site is wrong.

 

Taking Toms review to be correct can the EPS12V cables be plugged into any of the sockets marked "6+2 PCIe & 4+4 CPU" in this picture (the sockets with 8 holes)?

 

I assume I then just use two of the other "6+2 PCIe & 4+4 CPU" sockets for the video card and leave off one of the 2 pin connectors?

 

Thanks for any help ?

 

P.S. In hindsight I should probably have bought the RM750x but oh well it's done now.

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There will be a side labeled PSU and a side labeled CPU or PCI-E. The PSU labeled side will be 8 connectors across the board and you don't pull anything off or anything like that and it will go to a 2x 6+2 pin connector where you'll plug in all 8 pins and the 6 of 8 pins on the second one and leave two dangling for the GPU side. For the EPS connector you don't need the extra 4-pin unless you're doing really really high end overclocking, like chilled water or LN2, or have some other special use case so I wouldn't worry about that regardless.

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The 8 pin EPS connector providess 384W of power, that's more than plenty.  No need for the second 4 pin.

You plug the 8 pin EPS (4+4 pin EPS) in the motherboard, the 24 pin (20+4 pin) ATX into the motherboard too.. The GPU will use two of the 4 PCIE connectors (8 pin PCIE/6+2 pin PCIE, so the +2 can be 'snapped off'). You can connect any SATA devices (e.g. optical drive, HDD, SSD, etc.) to the SATA cables on the PSU and leave all the rest in the box.

 

EPS and PCIE connectors are physically and electronically different, can't use those interchangeably. That's only on the device side, on the PSU side it seems to use these connectors:

image.png.2e3e3622de414fd9f637f3631cf535ff.png

"We're all in this together, might as well be friends" Tom, Toonami.

 

mini eLiXiVy: my open source 65% mechanical PCB, a build log, PCB anatomy and discussing open source licenses: https://linustechtips.com/topic/1366493-elixivy-a-65-mechanical-keyboard-build-log-pcb-anatomy-and-how-i-open-sourced-this-project/

 

mini_cardboard: a 4% keyboard build log and how keyboards workhttps://linustechtips.com/topic/1328547-mini_cardboard-a-4-keyboard-build-log-and-how-keyboards-work/

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The 4 pin EPS connector is useless. It's as useful as RGB, and is there for the same reasons.

You can plug any PCIe cable or EPS cable into any of those sockets, correct.

:)

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