Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Synology NAS, Change of Operating System

Hi All.

 

I was wondering if it is at all possible to change the operating system of Synology's NAS'. Updating or upgrading of DSM is not what I mean here, but instead completely remove DSM and install a different OS. Is it possible to install say Windows 10 or Windows Server, perhaps one or more Linux distros? Has anyone had any experiences trying anything in this regard, and if so, how did it turn out and how - if I may ask - did you accomplish it?

 

Thank you very much.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to go out on a lim here and gamble that the answer is no. Now if it runs off of effectively standard hardware you could potentially reverse engineer it yourself but the whole point of buying something like a Synology NAS or a QNAP or a WD MyCloud is for the express purpose of not having to install or configure your own OS. You'd kind of be defeating the purpose of it if you could/can.

 

If you're interested in installing a different OS (Like Windows) why didn't you build/buy a standard server to begin with?

Guides & Tutorials:

Testing for RAM Errors w/ MemTest86

How To: Remotely Access a Computer, Server, or NAS

How To: Access Remote Systems at Home/Work Securely from Anywhere with Pritunl

How to Format Storage Devices in Windows 10

A How-To: Drive Sharing in Windows 10

VFIO GPU Pass-though w/ Looking Glass KVM on Ubuntu 19.04

A How-To Guide: Building a Rudimentary Disk Enclosure

Three Methods to Resetting a Windows Login Password

 

Guide/Tutorial in Progress:

iPXE Network Booting to an iSCSI Target

 

In the Queue:

 

 

Don't see what you need? Check the Full List or *PM me, if I haven't made it I'll add it to the list.

*NOTE: I'll only add it to the list if the request is something I know I can do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'd agree.  I'd be surprised if these weren't BIOS locked to prevent any other OS from running.  In fact, there's a project (name escapes me) that let's you run DSM on a non-Synology computer, but it requires a BIOS loader.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys.

 

Are you saying that the motherboard is custom made with a BIOS developed by Synology, thus - I guess - making it somewhat "impossible" to actually make it work with another OS? On the motherboard I have noticed a sort of plug-in daughter board in style with an M.2 og mSATA interface that hosts the basic OS from Synology, so that the device can start up, even if no disks are inserted. Is what you describe perhaps related to this card and any lock of the board would be or could be associated with this? I have never tried to unplug this card and then start the NAS, but perhaps someone else have tried that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

beside what has been said there is also the thing that it makes absolutely no sense to do this as you can build a better system for less money and the one main reason to use a Synology system is to have their OS on it and get the features it has with minimal administrative effort.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, but if you already have the NAS, then spending more money is just more money out of your pocket. Having it, makes it kind of "free" vs having to buy new hardware for a completely different system. I am just wondering if it is possible, and/or if anyone has ever tried it. If so, I would like to hear about the experiences and which efforts were actually done.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Chiming in a couple of years later for the record. 

On 7/9/2019 at 8:24 AM, Windows7ge said:

...the whole point of buying something like a Synology NAS or a QNAP or a WD MyCloud is for the express purpose of not having to install or configure your own OS. You'd kind of be defeating the purpose of it if you could/can.

 

If you're interested in installing a different OS (Like Windows) why didn't you build/buy a standard server to begin with?

That's a bizarre response. A person might always decide that experimenting with a different OS is worthwhile, especially for something like a NAS. The "whole point" of buying a NAS is not going to be a universal singular thing like not wanting to configure an OS. Different people will have different goals. For example, a NAS can be attractive just for being an inexpensive way to get the hardware, a multiple-drive bay device in a compact form factor like a 1U rack or the compact desktop NASes. General purpose rack servers are expensive, and cheap mini-PCs don't have the drive bays to be good NASes.

 

And of course at any arbitrary Time Point X, after buying the NAS, a person might decide they want to try other OSes on it, so objecting to the idea from the temporal perspective of someone making a buying decision is invalid. It's like telling someone to travel back in time and to just not have the same thoughts and curiosity they had in this timeline...

 

Synology's Disk Station Manager is based on Linux (why don't these companies ever innovate and build a new, optimized, and secure OS from scratch?). And the hardware is standard Intel parts. So that implies you can run anything that runs on the hardware. It's basically a PC like any other PC. Some of the hardware details might be unusual, like where they store and load the OS – I read that it's a separate little flash disk. I wondered about FreeBSD, which seems like an excellent choice for a NAS, and found this guy's successful attempt. So depending on your Synology model, it should be possible to do what he did. Note that the hitch was the power going to the SATA drives, and he had to find a workaround, which in his case was just physically attaching another power source so that they were powered by default.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@FalconBlue ~1.75 years later. The Internet never forgets, eh?

 

Where were you when OP posted this on July 9, 2019? Usually people oppose my opinion after a matter of minutes not years...

 

If he got it for free. All the power to him to try installing something else. If he paid for it he didn't think far enough into the future as to weather or not it'd meet his needs. These are the types of things you're suppose to think about before buying an appliance. If he learns that now it's a mistake he won't make in the future.

Guides & Tutorials:

Testing for RAM Errors w/ MemTest86

How To: Remotely Access a Computer, Server, or NAS

How To: Access Remote Systems at Home/Work Securely from Anywhere with Pritunl

How to Format Storage Devices in Windows 10

A How-To: Drive Sharing in Windows 10

VFIO GPU Pass-though w/ Looking Glass KVM on Ubuntu 19.04

A How-To Guide: Building a Rudimentary Disk Enclosure

Three Methods to Resetting a Windows Login Password

 

Guide/Tutorial in Progress:

iPXE Network Booting to an iSCSI Target

 

In the Queue:

 

 

Don't see what you need? Check the Full List or *PM me, if I haven't made it I'll add it to the list.

*NOTE: I'll only add it to the list if the request is something I know I can do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×