Jump to content

why not vaccum sealed hard drives

pizza_processor

I know there is helium sealed hard drives out there because it's lighter than air. But why not vacuum sealed hard drives there is no air in there so read and write head can freely move without air resistance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, pizza_processor said:

I know there is helium sealed hard drives out there because it's lighter than air. But why not vacuum sealed hard drives there is no air in there so read and write head can freely move without air resistance

dave mosley [ceo of seagate] "dont f**king move"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like it wouldn't make that much of a difference and it would cost more for the consumer

8086k

aorus pro z390

noctua nh-d15s chromax w black cover

evga 3070 ultra

samsung 128gb, adata swordfish 1tb, wd blue 1tb

seasonic 620w dogballs psu

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, fantasia. said:

I feel like it wouldn't make that much of a difference and it would cost more for the consumer

and wouldnt the pressure also mess with the disk?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

its very complicated to make perfectly sealed things especially if you also need to have electrical connections and moving parts at the same time.

 

its much simpler to just fill it with helium at slightly above atmospheric pressure, that way it will only be helium slowly leaking out but never other gasses coming in unless there is a major leak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just now, just that pc guy said:

and wouldnt the pressure also mess with the disk?

im not an hdd expert so i dunno

8086k

aorus pro z390

noctua nh-d15s chromax w black cover

evga 3070 ultra

samsung 128gb, adata swordfish 1tb, wd blue 1tb

seasonic 620w dogballs psu

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's incredible hard to create vacuum

The data is stored inside the drive on platters, which are made of metal or glass or composites. The read/write heads "float" on a cushion of gasses over the surface of the platters.  As the discs spin, due to friction with the gasses inside, the discs heat up and slightly expand.

As the air inside warms up, the air pressure inside changes - that's why there's a vent on mechanical drives, to equalize the air pressure.  If the pressure changes too much, the read/write heads shift vertically, the distance between head and platter can change. With vent, the air pressure inside can equalize.

Helium is used in drives because it reduces the air pressure and friction, so platters heat less and the heads can float closer to the platters with no risk of actually hitting the platters.

Without any gas inside, you'd need way better circuity to prevent heads from hitting the platters if there's some mechanical shocks for example.

 

even helium is problematic, because it can leak through some epoxies, rubbers etc etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/27/2019 at 9:42 AM, mariushm said:

It's incredible hard to create vacuum

The data is stored inside the drive on platters, which are made of metal or glass or composites. The read/write heads "float" on a cushion of gasses over the surface of the platters.  As the discs spin, due to friction with the gasses inside, the discs heat up and slightly expand.

As the air inside warms up, the air pressure inside changes - that's why there's a vent on mechanical drives, to equalize the air pressure.  If the pressure changes too much, the read/write heads shift vertically, the distance between head and platter can change. With vent, the air pressure inside can equalize.

Helium is used in drives because it reduces the air pressure and friction, so platters heat less and the heads can float closer to the platters with no risk of actually hitting the platters.

Without any gas inside, you'd need way better circuity to prevent heads from hitting the platters if there's some mechanical shocks for example.

 

even helium is problematic, because it can leak through some epoxies, rubbers etc etc

I have to agree with you on that one. I will just stick to flash memory

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×