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Should I liquid cool or air cool my cpu?

Go to solution Solved by EpiCheeseTime,

Liquid will make it not heat up as much nor as faster than air. Like @Chevy_Monsenhor said, if it fits, it sits.

 

Day to day use, air cooling will be plenty, but if you want to overclock and get every frame of performance out of your chip, then liquid cool it. You will be able to push more out of the chip, but you can over clock a little using the stock cooler, but not by much. With a client's 2600, I was only able to increase it by maybe 1.5-2 mhz. Where as putting a simple 120mm aio, i was able to get about 4.

 

Then again, each chip is different and your 2600 may hate being over clocked on air, if you have the money and room to add an AIO, go for it.

I'm making a mitx build with a Ryzen R5 2600 in a silverstone sg13, which of the two is a better option? 

The silverstone tundra TD03-lite is very tempting for sgd$45 and the only low profile air cooler that fits is the noctua nh L9a and it's $69.

My Main System :  https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone Sugo SG13W) 

My Home Gaming Pc : https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone RVZ03) 

O

 

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If you can make the AIO fit in the SG13, go for it.

If you don't plan on overclocking the 2600 i think even the stock Wraith Spire cooler would do for you, if it fits, of course.

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Liquid will make it not heat up as much nor as faster than air. Like @Chevy_Monsenhor said, if it fits, it sits.

 

Day to day use, air cooling will be plenty, but if you want to overclock and get every frame of performance out of your chip, then liquid cool it. You will be able to push more out of the chip, but you can over clock a little using the stock cooler, but not by much. With a client's 2600, I was only able to increase it by maybe 1.5-2 mhz. Where as putting a simple 120mm aio, i was able to get about 4.

 

Then again, each chip is different and your 2600 may hate being over clocked on air, if you have the money and room to add an AIO, go for it.

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6 minutes ago, EpiCheeseTime said:

Liquid will make it not heat up as much nor as faster than air. Like @Chevy_Monsenhor said, if it fits, it sits.

 

Day to day use, air cooling will be plenty, but if you want to overclock and get every frame of performance out of your chip, then liquid cool it. You will be able to push more out of the chip, but you can over clock a little using the stock cooler, but not by much. With a client's 2600, I was only able to increase it by maybe 1.5-2 mhz. Where as putting a simple 120mm aio, i was able to get about 4.

 

Then again, each chip is different and your 2600 may hate being over clocked on air, if you have the money and room to add an AIO, go for it.

It's a video editing build, so yes I'll be overclocking. 

My Main System :  https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone Sugo SG13W) 

My Home Gaming Pc : https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone RVZ03) 

O

 

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Video editing as a MITX, I would love to see that.

 

But then I would personally watercool it. It will protect your investment and keep things quieter/cooler in the long run.

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Watercooler, cool way better and diferent from air you probably wont notice any diference if the day is hot

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Stock cooler?

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Nevermind, mini itx

Before you reply to my post, REFRESH. 99.99% chance I edited my post. 

 

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1 hour ago, EpiCheeseTime said:

Liquid will make it not heat up as much nor as faster than air. Like @Chevy_Monsenhor said, if it fits, it sits.

 

Day to day use, air cooling will be plenty, but if you want to overclock and get every frame of performance out of your chip, then liquid cool it. You will be able to push more out of the chip, but you can over clock a little using the stock cooler, but not by much. With a client's 2600, I was only able to increase it by maybe 1.5-2 mhz. Where as putting a simple 120mm aio, i was able to get about 4.

 

Then again, each chip is different and your 2600 may hate being over clocked on air, if you have the money and room to add an AIO, go for it.

120mm aio’s are in general useless. Need that 240mm rad for cooling properly 

 

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Unless you have one of the eight core CPUs, I would recommend you to upgrade to those FIRST, than upgrading to a liquid cooler, because you get bigger gains with a 33% increase in core count (from 6 to 8), rather than from 3.9 GHz to 4.1 GHz, that means, you could get a Ryzen 7 2700 and stock cooler, which will yield more computing power, than Ryzen 5 2600 and liquid cooled to 4.1 GHz. That is assuming your Ryzen CPU can hit that safely. Max safe voltage for Ryzen is ~1.35V. You would get more performance by going with the 2700 and overclocking it to 3.8 GHz, compared to 4.1 GHz 2600.

 

EDIT: I forgot to mention, I read your statement that this is for video editing, and that is why I suggest going with an 8 core 2700 rather than a 6 core 2600.

Edited by Berfs1
added reasoning for suggestion
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8 hours ago, Berfs1 said:

Unless you have one of the eight core CPUs, I would recommend you to upgrade to those FIRST, than upgrading to a liquid cooler, because you get bigger gains with a 33% increase in core count (from 6 to 8), rather than from 3.9 GHz to 4.1 GHz, that means, you could get a Ryzen 7 2700 and stock cooler, which will yield more computing power, than Ryzen 5 2600 and liquid cooled to 4.1 GHz. That is assuming your Ryzen CPU can hit that safely. Max safe voltage for Ryzen is ~1.35V. You would get more performance by going with the 2700 and overclocking it to 3.8 GHz, compared to 4.1 GHz 2600.

 

EDIT: I forgot to mention, I read your statement that this is for video editing, and that is why I suggest going with an 8 core 2700 rather than a 6 core 2600.

Thank you, I'll get a 8 core then. 

My Main System :  https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone Sugo SG13W) 

My Home Gaming Pc : https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Hk4pcY (Silverstone RVZ03) 

O

 

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On 3/14/2019 at 8:37 PM, SGTechGamer said:

Thank you, I'll get a 8 core then. 

So, essentially, a higher core count chip will have a higher life expectancy rate compared to a lower core count (6 cores in this case) overclocked to match the computing performance of the eight core. However, IF YOU ARE GAMING, the Ryzen 5 2600X and a liquid cooler is your best bet if you are gaming, but a 2700 and stock cooler will match the computing performance of that combination, while taking less energy, thus lasting longer.

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