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Questions about fiber and connectors

Theodor(XD)
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My ISP offered me fiber internet to the house,

Everything was fine until I wanted to use the LAN ports on the back of the modem router switch access point combo they gave me. It didn't work. W/ a bit of research I found out the router is so broken only wifi works ( the DHCP server only works on wifi and doesn't work on LAN ) and I am tired of trying to fix it, because many people have reported the same problem. Either way, I was planning on buying this Mikrotik Router: https://mikrotik.com/product/rb4011igs_5hacq2hnd_in . My questions are:

1. Is the SFP+ port an input that I can use for the fiber that comes from my isp?
2. My isp gives me 1 fiber terminated w/ an SC connector. If Q1 is true, is there a way to convert the SC fiber to an sfp+ fiber, and, if so, with what equipment would that be done(product names and types for adapters?)? 
3. If Q1 is false, recommend me some good fiber modems that accept an sc fiber input, if you know any. 

Thank you in advance. 

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1. Typically ISPs send the fiber into an ONT which then gives you ethernet. You can't just plug their fiber into an SFP+ port and expect it to work. It does depend on how the ISP does their fiber though (If you're lucky, it's direct connection, but I doubt it)

2. There is no such thing as SC fiber vs SFP+ fiber. They use the types of fiber. SFP+ modules can have different ends (typically LC is the most popular). What matters is matching the type of fiber the ISP has (Can be MM for Multimode or SM for Single Mode fiber, and then there's different levels such as OM2, OM3, etc)

3. Typically you're forced to use the ISP equipment. I doubt they would allow a third party ONT on their systems (I mean you can ask though).

Could you post the model number of the modem router switch combo? I find it odd that the fiber goes directly to it (Different than how Verizon Fios does it here using an ONT)

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Hi Theodor,

 

RB4011 is a great piece of hardware - so it's a good start. Capacity-wise it might be a bit overkill (unless you really require over 1G capacity), if you need something under 500M and you want to save a few bucks, you might be good with slightly older RB2011.

 

1. It depends on technology. If your ISP is using just regular GPON or EPON (GPON is the most likely option), this might be a bit tricky - in xPON world, the end device which is being delivered by the ISP if pre-authorized to get access to their network. If you ISP is willing to give you an SFP transceiver or authorize your private xPON SPF transceiver, that might be an option. If the latter option - then you can use something like this - https://mikrotik.com/product/SFPONU. If the technology is not GPON/EPON - it's most likely a regular P2P connection using WDM.

2. SC is just a connector, there're SFP transceivers for SC. If technology is GPON/EPON - see my answer above. If the technology is P2P - you can get an SFP WDM (WDM because you mentioned 1 fibre) transceiver with a SFP connector. Then there's the type of the connector (APC or UPC), type of fibre (single mode or multi mode) which is also important before you choose a transceiver.

If you feel lost with all these acronyms, just post photos of your network kit and we'll figure something out.

 

Note: I've referred to SFP many times even though RB4011 has SFP+ port as SFP+ is compatible backwards and unless you need a 10G transceiver, you'll be good with 1G(-ish) SFP transceiver.

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  • 2 months later...

First of all, thank you for the quick responses and sorry for my lack of activity( I wasn't notified about your responses and therefore didn't check ).

I have talked to my ISP and they don't offer anything else (without charging like assholes), but they are willing to change the router to it's "bridge mode", which allows me to use it like a modem w/ the ethernet port on the back.

Their equipment is the AN5506-04F: http://flytec.com.py/download/files/AN5506-04F-manual.pdf

I will probably just ask them to switch it to that mode and use that Mikrotik router and forget about it.

Thank you for clearing my misconceptions.

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