Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Drive life? Hwinfo

 Share

Go to solution Solved by mariushm,

That value is most likely calculated from the amount of data you written to drive.

 

If your drive is Kingston UV400 (guessing based on caption in picture), then see the TBW value at the bottom of this datasheet: https://www.kingston.com/datasheets/SUV400S3_us.pdf

In short, the drives are warranties for 3 years or until you exceed that TBW value which is

 

120GB: 50TB

240GB: 100TB

480GB: 200TB

960GB: 400TB

 

You probably have the 240 GB model.  So since your TBW value is 100 TB and you already wrote 34.634 TB to you, that means you "used" approximately 34.6% of the drive's "life", so you're left with  100% - 34.6% = 65.4% ...  the 64% number is probably due to using multiples of 1000 instead of 1024 when converting MB, GB, TB ... and other such crap.

So that figure doesn't mean that the drive is faulty or dying, it just means there's a reasonable wear on the flash memory chips, but they're still capable of safely storing data in them.

Once you get over around 90 TB of writes, you should consider replacing the drive with something else. Chances are the drive will still work fine even with you going over around 120 TB of writes, as the SSD will start using portions of flash memory it hid from you from the start, which aren't so worn down, but the performance will probably decrease substantially.

 

Is this accurate? Is this something i should be worried about ? Im not that worried about the 64% drive, thats my mac OS. But the windows 90% drive is just couple of months old.... Is this accurate what HWinfo is showing?

DRIVE LIFE.png

i7-9700k 4.9ghz, 16gb Dominator Platinum 3000mhz, Asus z370-f Mobo, GTX 1080 JETSTREAM, 970 evo m.2, s340 elite. Corsair h115i CPU cooler.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Define a "couple" of months? What is/has been running on the Windows drive? it has 12,000GB vs the 32,000GB on the other drive. It's getting like 5 or more times the writes (assuming the other drives are a couple of years old).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is an estimate provided by the drive based on its rated write endurance and writes up to that point. When you get a new SSD, you're installing a lot of software on it so it is not unusual to take an initial hit. However 12TB lifetime writes sounds like a fair bit. What capacity is the drive? You can also download Kingston's SSD tool whatever it is called to check the reported life.

TV Gaming system: Asus B560M-A, i7-11700k, Scythe Fuma 2, Corsair Vengeance Pro RGB 3200@2133 4x16GB, MSI 3070 Gaming Trio X, EVGA Supernova G2L 850W, Anidees Ai Crystal, Samsung 980 Pro 2TB, LG OLED55B9PLA 4k120 G-Sync Compatible
Streaming system: Asus X299 TUF mark 2, i9-7920X, Noctua D15, Corsair Vengeance LPX RGB 3000 8x8GB, Gigabyte 2070, Corsair HX1000i, GameMax Abyss, Samsung 970 Evo 500GB, Crucial BX500 1TB, BenQ XL2411 1080p144 + HP LP2475w 1200p60
Gaming laptop: Lenovo Legion, 5800H, DDR4 3200C22 2x8GB, RTX 3070, SK Hynix 512 GB + Crucial P1 TB SSD, 165 Hz IPS 1080p G-Sync Compatible

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

That value is most likely calculated from the amount of data you written to drive.

 

If your drive is Kingston UV400 (guessing based on caption in picture), then see the TBW value at the bottom of this datasheet: https://www.kingston.com/datasheets/SUV400S3_us.pdf

In short, the drives are warranties for 3 years or until you exceed that TBW value which is

 

120GB: 50TB

240GB: 100TB

480GB: 200TB

960GB: 400TB

 

You probably have the 240 GB model.  So since your TBW value is 100 TB and you already wrote 34.634 TB to you, that means you "used" approximately 34.6% of the drive's "life", so you're left with  100% - 34.6% = 65.4% ...  the 64% number is probably due to using multiples of 1000 instead of 1024 when converting MB, GB, TB ... and other such crap.

So that figure doesn't mean that the drive is faulty or dying, it just means there's a reasonable wear on the flash memory chips, but they're still capable of safely storing data in them.

Once you get over around 90 TB of writes, you should consider replacing the drive with something else. Chances are the drive will still work fine even with you going over around 120 TB of writes, as the SSD will start using portions of flash memory it hid from you from the start, which aren't so worn down, but the performance will probably decrease substantially.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×