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Can to high a GPU power cause problems?

SM Phoo
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Hi guys, I currently have a Corsair 750w PSU that powers my PC fine

(1080ti, 32gb, 8700k, AIO cooler, few hard drives etc)

 

My friend bought a Seasonic Prime 1300w GPU and they sent two by mistake. He said I could buy one for half price if I wanted, so effectiivley we'd both have one at £125 each, so basically a bargain.

I'm not worried about the spending money for the sake of it argument, as I could sell my GPU to cover a lot of the cost, plus the seasonic has a 12yr warranty, the cost is evened out.

My biggest issue is, is having to much power damaging my computer, or could I consider it just future proofing my GPU for a lot of years.

 

Both are gold rated,  80+ and full modular

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1 minute ago, SM Phoo said:

Hi guys, I currently have a Corsair 750w PSU that powers my PC fine

(1080ti, 32gb, 8700k, AIO cooler, few hard drives etc)

 

My friend bought a Seasonic Prime 1300w GPU and they sent two by mistake. He said I could buy one for half price if I wanted, so effectiivley we'd both have one at £125 each, so basically a bargain.

I'm not worried about the spending money for the sake of it argument, as I could sell my GPU to cover a lot of the cost, plus the seasonic has a 12yr warranty, the cost is evened out.

My biggest issue is, is having to much power damaging my computer, or could I consider it just future proofing my GPU for a lot of years.

 

Both are gold rated,  80+ and full modular

Lots of people will tell you that it's not good but in my opinion it's perfectly fine. If you don't use all of the PSU then you don't use all of the PSU, it won't force power through the leads. You're perfectly fine.

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It won't cause any damage provided that it's a quality unit. A higher wattage PSU typically means more headroom when you add more components or replace components with those that consume more power.

 

The reason why people tend to discourage others from buying high wattage PSUs is not necessarily due to safety but more to do with cost, as a 1300W PSU is totally unnecessary for a more typical single GPU + reasonably upper-midrange/high-end CPU, and the extra premium on that PSU could have been put into something that matters more like a better GPU.

 

 

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The PSU just provides 12V. It doesn't matter how many amps it's capable of delivering, it'll power it just fine. 

However, I have no idea why anyone would ever want to get a Prime Gold, let alone pay for it. It's among the loudest PSUs on the market. 

Edited by seon123
Something something

:)

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9 minutes ago, SM Phoo said:

they sent two by mistake. He said I could buy one for half price

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A power supply only produces as much power as the computer components demand.

 

If we make an analogy with car engines, a car will consume some amount of fuel at low speeds and more fuel at very high speeds - just because the engine is capable of very high speeds, it doesn't mean the car engine is constantly consuming the highest amount of fuel.

 

So if your computer only requires 200 watts, the power supply will produce only 200 watts. The 1300 watts value is the threshold where the power supply says "Dude, can't give you more".

There's benefits and small downsides for using a power supply meant for things that will usually ask for a lot of watts.

 

Benefits : The power supply may run without its fan running at all. Because it's designed to be able to produce a lot of watts, it will be very efficient and therefore produce minimal amount of heat, so it won't have to turn its fan on when it produces a low amount of watts. That's good for you, you get a more silent computer.  Being designed to power lots of components, it will have more modular connectors which may allow you more flexibility when doing cable management.  It also has 12y warranty and it's a newer design, probably more efficient than yours.

 

The only small downside is that being designed for so high wattage, the power supply may be optimized to be the most efficient at slightly higher thresholds, so when your computer parts only demand 100-200 watts, the power supply could be slightly less efficient compared to a power supply designed for lower wattage.

Power supplies don't have the same efficiency throughout their whole range of output power. The efficiency is lower as low wattage, peaks at around 60-70% of the power supply's maximum output wattage and then slowly decreases as you get near the maximum output power.  Here's an example with a 1200w power supply:

 

efficiency_1200w.jpg.616575cb19cdd195fbd790b39ed6239f.jpg

 

So let's say the 1300w power supply will have this efficiency curve (in reality the Prime's efficiency curve will probably be pretty similar to this one)

You can see that if your computer components consume around 175w in total, then the power supply will only be around 90% efficient, which means  the power supply will have to take 195 watts from the mains socket to produce 175w for your computer, so 20 watts will be wasted as heat.

A power supply designed for lower wattage, let's say 550-600w model, may have 94% efficiency at this amount of watts, which may mean only 10 watts are wasted as heat, and that overall your computer consumes 10 watts less. This isn't much, but if you run the computer 24/7 at this power consumption level, you would save 7kWh or around 3$ on your power bill.

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Thanks for the replies and thanks @mariushm for the detailed response.

 

I've worked out an average of what my computer should need to run and estimates at around 450-500w using pcpartpicker

This is the efficiency rating of the GPU according to their website:

Gold.png

 

I'm not sure what the difference between 115v and 230v, but I guess If I say my PC needs 475w to run, thats about 35% I guess.

 

The Corsair RM750X looks more like this:

aHR0cDovL21lZGlhLmJlc3RvZm1pY3JvLmNvbS9W

 

The efficiency curve seems similar.

Maybe I just don't need the PSU at all.

My thinking is just a brand new PSU, cheap price, big warranty and future proof for if and when I add parts that may require more power.

Whereas if I need to upgrade my PSU in the future to maybe a 900w or so, it'd cost just as much as this 1300w

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21 hours ago, SM Phoo said:

Hi guys, I currently have a Corsair 750w PSU that powers my PC fine

(1080ti, 32gb, 8700k, AIO cooler, few hard drives etc)

 

Both are gold rated,  80+ and full modular

Wich one is it exactly?

And I'd not get it.

Its just a waste of money that doesn't give you much benefit. If your PC doesn't come close to the Wattage, its just useless.

 

So why Change??

21 hours ago, D13H4RD said:

It won't cause any damage provided that it's a quality unit. A higher wattage PSU typically means more headroom when you add more components or replace components with those that consume more power.

Headroom for what?


The Claim that it won't cause any damage is not entirely true as higher wattage units provide higher current.

And higher current means more damage when something goes wrong.

 

Here you can see what happens if you have too much current:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/31-power-supplies/944707-why-single-rail-not-better-than-multi-rail.html

 

21 hours ago, D13H4RD said:

The reason why people tend to discourage others from buying high wattage PSUs is not necessarily due to safety but more to do with cost, as a 1300W PSU is totally unnecessary

Its a mixture of both...

It is more unsafe. It is more often than not higher wattages tend to be much louder, it is way more expensive.

 

In the end, it makes no sense.

 

Even if it would be "half the price"...

Especially since it hurts the etailer and someone might even loose his job...

"Hell is full of good meanings, but Heaven is full of good works"

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