Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Connecting two home Networks

lstmysock11
 Share

I have two home Networks and each have their own internet connection. Looking to combine them together and share internet connections and be able to share printers and so on. How can I do this? Right now have two wifi routers and each have their own internet connection but need a way to bridge them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

How far apart?  What are your options for connecting them?

 

Realistically you'd have a transit interface/subnet on your router that has a link to their router, and a route pointing their LAN subnet over whatever local link you hooked up between them.

 

2 minutes ago, Electronics Wizardy said:

vpn

That's probably the laziest conceivable response.

PC : 3600 · Crosshair VI WiFi · 2x16GB RGB 3200 · 1080Ti SC2 · 1TB WD SN750 · EVGA 1600G2 · Define C 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

How remote are they of each other? Same floor, same building, same town? What kind of networking equipment are you using - standard consumer routers or something more prosumer/business/enterprise level? How experienced are you with networks and the equipment?

 

Just connecting two consumer routers with a cable is not going to work - instead it may cause issues in your network when both routers are giving out IPs.

 

Some business-level routers allow you to configure each interface separately and also set up routing configuration. This would be the ideal solution, if you have the needed network knowledge. Then you could configure static IPs on both ends of that link and configure routes on both routers (or if you wanna explore more of the networking stuff, you could automate that with e.g. OSPF, implying you have the capable equipment).

 

VPN may not be the best solution. While it can share the networks connected to each client/server, it also creates another network, that may be unnecessary for this use case. Plus it adds the encryption overhead, which is unnecessary cost if the networks can be connected directly. But this may be the best solution, if these networks are completely remote from each other.

 

EDIT: If these are very close, you may be better off getting a router that supports multiple gateways and moving everything into one network. Otherwise you will just complicate the whole setup and that may turn out to be a serious PITA if you're gonna need to troubleshoot something in the future.

HAL9000: AMD Ryzen 9 3900x | Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black | 32 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz | Asus X570 Prime Pro | ASUS TUF 3080 Ti | 1 TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus + 1 TB Crucial MX500 + 6 TB WD RED | Corsair HX1000 | be quiet Pure Base 500DX | LG 34UM95 34" 3440x1440

Hydrogen server: Intel i3-10100 | Cryorig M9i | 64 GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DDR4 | Gigabyte B560M-DS3H | 33 TB of storage | Fractal Design Define R5 | unRAID 6.9.2

Carbon server: Fujitsu PRIMERGY RX100 S7p | Xeon E3-1230 v2 | 16 GB DDR3 ECC | 60 GB Corsair SSD & 250 GB Samsung 850 Pro | Intel i340-T4 | ESXi 6.5.1

Big Mac cluster: 2x Raspberry Pi 2 Model B | 1x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B | 2x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Network A is on the first floor with it's own internet, Network b is in the basement with it's own internet and own router. It is possible to hard wire between the two spaces. Do not want to use any kind of VPN. Want some kind of hardware connection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, lstmysock11 said:

Network A is on the first floor with it's own internet, Network b is in the basement with it's own internet and own router. It is possible to hard wire between the two spaces. Do not want to use any kind of VPN. Want some kind of hardware connection.

1 - Are the same internet connections on the same ISP?

 

2- Be aware that if you begin purchasing consumer hardware and dont know what you are doing you can create routing loops between the ISP(s) and protect will shut all your service down if its triggered. 

 

3 - Do you have permission to do this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

They are from two different unrelated ISP's. Guess not such a good idea then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a way to bridge the two networks to be able to share printers and files and not cross the ISP's and yet each side has their own ISP connection?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 1/3/2019 at 10:33 PM, lstmysock11 said:

Is there a way to bridge the two networks to be able to share printers and files and not cross the ISP's and yet each side has their own ISP connection?

The way to do this would probably be VLANs with separate gateways (ISP connections) but this would be very complex to do and require enterprise-grade switches and routers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 1/3/2019 at 11:57 AM, mynameisjuan said:

2- Be aware that if you begin purchasing consumer hardware and dont know what you are doing you can create routing loops between the ISP(s) and protect will shut all your service down if its triggered. 

Please explain how a consumer would create ISP level routing loops when they aren't participating in a dynamic routing protocol.

PC : 3600 · Crosshair VI WiFi · 2x16GB RGB 3200 · 1080Ti SC2 · 1TB WD SN750 · EVGA 1600G2 · Define C 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, beersykins said:

Please explain how a consumer would create ISP level routing loops when they aren't participating in a dynamic routing protocol.

I agree here that it is highly unlikely a user with a consumer grade load balancing router would manage to cause a routing loop. If it was enterprise gear then yes maybe, but not with consumer grade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, beersykins said:

Please explain how a consumer would create ISP level routing loops when they aren't participating in a dynamic routing protocol.

No fucking clue why I posted that. I was probably working on something else in the middle of typing, but my comment makes no sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×