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Need Opinion on first $1500 gaming pc build plz

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Go to solution Solved by Herman Mcpootis,

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor  ($246.05 @ Austin Computers) 
Motherboard: Asus - PRIME X370-PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard  ($149.00 @ Shopping Express) much better VRMs than the B450 asus boards, BIOS should be updated by now.
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory  (Purchased For $168.00) 
Storage: Crucial - MX500 250 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive  ($65.00 @ PCCaseGear) 
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive  ($54.50 @ Shopping Express) 
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB Video Card  ($599.00 @ Umart) 
Case: Corsair - Carbide Series 275R (White w/Tempered Glass) ATX Mid Tower Case  ($109.25 @ Austin Computers) 
Power Supply: Antec - Earthwatts Gold Pro 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply  ($105.00 @ IJK) the NEX is mediocre, this is much better.
Total: $1495.80
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-23 13:42 AEDT+1100

Need opinion and suggestion on my first PC build. I have two different ones and I would like to see which one will perform better and gaming and a bit of youtube and music. I'll link both builds. The ryzen one has a problem with the ssd and I don't know what that means can someone explain plz.

 

i5 8600k + 1060 6gb:https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/Vdzcvn

 

 

Ryzen 5 2600X + 1070Ti:https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/wyngmq

 

 

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Something like this would be better. The 2600 is basically a 2600X without an overclock, so by OCing the 2600 you could get 2600x level speeds or higher. The speed difference between NVME SSDs and SATA SSDs in day to day use are minimal, unless you are frequently move 4K videos around. Also you don’t need a ASUS ROG STRIX motherboard, those are pretty high end and usually very expensive.

 

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1 minute ago, _d0nut said:

Something like this would be better. The 2600 is basically a 2600X without an overclock, so by OCing the 2600 you could get 2600x level speeds or higher. The speed difference between NVME SSDs and SATA SSDs in day to day use are minimal, unless you are frequently move 4K videos around. Also you don’t need a ASUS ROG STRIX motherboard, those are pretty high end and usually very expensive.

 

thanks will take this in mind

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Just a PCIE lane allocation thing, part of how the motherboard is designed. You'd still have 4 usable sata ports when using the 970 alongside it, so unless you plan on adding another 4 or more drives, not an issue at all after reading on mobo manual which ports exactly get disabled. That said, would second @_d0nut's advice.

CPU: AMD Sempron 2400+ / MOBO: Abit NF7-S2G / GPU: WinFast A180BT 64MB / RAM: Mushkin DDR333 256MBx2 / HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM 120GB

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Just now, meenmeen1103 said:

Just a PCIE lane allocation thing, part of how the motherboard is designed. You'd still have 4 usable sata ports when using the 970 alongside it, so unless you plan on adding another 4 or more drives, not an issue at all after reading on mobo manual which ports exactly get disabled. That said, would second @_d0nut's advice.

Thanks I'm new to PC building and didn't know what it meant

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1 minute ago, GoldenCape said:

Thanks I'm new to PC building and didn't know what it meant

Well this forum is a good place to learn :) I'll add that while there's little difference after overclocking between 2600 and 2600X, if you do plan to OC, you'll need a better cooler. The included ones do great at stock settings, but not so much when OC'd.

CPU: AMD Sempron 2400+ / MOBO: Abit NF7-S2G / GPU: WinFast A180BT 64MB / RAM: Mushkin DDR333 256MBx2 / HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM 120GB

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PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor  ($246.05 @ Austin Computers) 
Motherboard: Asus - PRIME X370-PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard  ($149.00 @ Shopping Express) much better VRMs than the B450 asus boards, BIOS should be updated by now.
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory  (Purchased For $168.00) 
Storage: Crucial - MX500 250 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive  ($65.00 @ PCCaseGear) 
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive  ($54.50 @ Shopping Express) 
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB Video Card  ($599.00 @ Umart) 
Case: Corsair - Carbide Series 275R (White w/Tempered Glass) ATX Mid Tower Case  ($109.25 @ Austin Computers) 
Power Supply: Antec - Earthwatts Gold Pro 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply  ($105.00 @ IJK) the NEX is mediocre, this is much better.
Total: $1495.80
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-23 13:42 AEDT+1100

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Heatsink: Gelid Phantom Black GPU: Palit RTX 3060 Ti Dual RAM: Corsair DDR4 2x8GB 3000Mhz mobo: Asus X570-P case: Fractal Design Define C PSU: Superflower Leadex Gold 650W

 

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