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Issues with windows 10 on older hardware

Methanol Ethanolovicz
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Since my alarm didn't go off yesterday for some reason, I overslept and missed my maths exam. Fortunately, my teacher is a cool guy, so he allowed me to do it in the afternoon in his office, along with a distance learning student (I don't know if that's how you call it in English, but whatever). Part of the test was done on a PC. Since he only has one in his office, he lent me his laptop. Unsurprisingly, Windows 10 did what they do best - started installing updates in the least appropriate situation. Of course, he started cursing how Windows 10 sucks, and how Windows 7 was a million times better (which I agree with, btw). This reminded me of the issues I used to have with it.

Before I built my Ryzen rig, I've tried Windows 10 on my old PC a couple of times during the time you could update to it for free. The PC consisted of Athlon 64 x2 6000+, GeForce 8500 GT, a generic Gigabyte motherboard, couple of old SATA HDDs (128, 256 and 480 GB. They were all split into at least two partitions since I took them from dead PCs, and was too lazy to format them), and 6 GB of RAM (all of the modules were different). I've had all sorts of weird issues with the OS. The most common one, which occurred every time I've tried it was that it couldn't install updates. Every time I've turned the PC on, it started configuring them, got stuck halfway through, and restarted after a few minutes. This process then repeated about 3 times, after which it gave up and said that the update failed and the changes had to be reverted. I then went back to W7 and gave W10 another try sometime later. This time, along with the aforementioned issue, the audio would stop working after the PC switched into sleep mode, forcing me to reconnect the speakers every time. Another issue I've had when giving it a third try (again accompanied by the first one) was that programs, which worked before, have suddenly not. I wanted to get some school work done one evening, so I fired up ArchiCAD. However, instead of the dialogue window reminding me that I'm using an educational version, I was greeted by an error message saying that this program was not designed to run on Windows. Within a couple of days, most of the programs I'm using started doing this, so I went back to Windows 7 yet again. After I've swapped the 8500 GT with an RX 470, I've decided to give it another try. Once again, the first issue occurred right after I've installed it. However, after a few days, parts of the OS itself stopped working. I was, for example, unable to access the settings, open the power tab or use Edge (not that I've ever used it for anything else than to install Chrome). I got sick of it after this, and have stuck to W7 for some time. Unfortunately, I was forced to go back to Windows 10 again after updating to Ryzen, because W7 doesn't support the AM4 platform and none of the USB ports are working during the installation. (I've heard that this can be solved by using an old PS/2 mouse since these ports should still work. Unfortunately, my Strix B350-F doesn't have one). At this point, the only thing left from my old PC was that 480 GB HDD, which I've still used as a primary boot drive, but I've still had issues during the updates. This persisted until I've swapped that HDD as well, after which it finally started working as it should.

Does Windows 10 just hate old hardware, or what? Did any of you have similar issues? 

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24 minutes ago, Methanol Ethanolovicz said:

Did any of you have similar issues? 

Windows 10, in my professional experience as an IT admin of over 1000 systems, sucks donkey balls.

We have had more issues with the Win10 system that we did roll out, than with anything I've *ever* administered before, and this includes Win98.

We use the LTSB version which is supposed to be less bloated but goddamn, it's so bad I've sworn off MS for good.

 

So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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43 minutes ago, Methanol Ethanolovicz said:

Since my alarm didn't go off yesterday for some reason, I overslept and missed my maths exam. Fortunately, my teacher is a cool guy, so he allowed me to do it in the afternoon in his office, along with a distance learning student (I don't know if that's how you call it in English, but whatever). Part of the test was done on a PC. Since he only has one in his office, he lent me his laptop. Unsurprisingly, Windows 10 did what they do best - started installing updates in the least appropriate situation. Of course, he started cursing how Windows 10 sucks, and how Windows 7 was a million times better (which I agree with, btw). This reminded me of the issues I used to have with it.

Before I built my Ryzen rig, I've tried Windows 10 on my old PC a couple of times during the time you could update to it for free. The PC consisted of Athlon 64 x2 6000+, GeForce 8500 GT, a generic Gigabyte motherboard, couple of old SATA HDDs (128, 256 and 480 GB. They were all split into at least two partitions since I took them from dead PCs, and was too lazy to format them), and 6 GB of RAM (all of the modules were different). I've had all sorts of weird issues with the OS. The most common one, which occurred every time I've tried it was that it couldn't install updates. Every time I've turned the PC on, it started configuring them, got stuck halfway through, and restarted after a few minutes. This process then repeated about 3 times, after which it gave up and said that the update failed and the changes had to be reverted. I then went back to W7 and gave W10 another try sometime later. This time, along with the aforementioned issue, the audio would stop working after the PC switched into sleep mode, forcing me to reconnect the speakers every time. Another issue I've had when giving it a third try (again accompanied by the first one) was that programs, which worked before, have suddenly not. I wanted to get some school work done one evening, so I fired up ArchiCAD. However, instead of the dialogue window reminding me that I'm using an educational version, I was greeted by an error message saying that this program was not designed to run on Windows. Within a couple of days, most of the programs I'm using started doing this, so I went back to Windows 7 yet again. After I've swapped the 8500 GT with an RX 470, I've decided to give it another try. Once again, the first issue occurred right after I've installed it. However, after a few days, parts of the OS itself stopped working. I was, for example, unable to access the settings, open the power tab or use Edge (not that I've ever used it for anything else than to install Chrome). I got sick of it after this, and have stuck to W7 for some time. Unfortunately, I was forced to go back to Windows 10 again after updating to Ryzen, because W7 doesn't support the AM4 platform and none of the USB ports are working during the installation. (I've heard that this can be solved by using an old PS/2 mouse since these ports should still work. Unfortunately, my Strix B350-F doesn't have one). At this point, the only thing left from my old PC was that 480 GB HDD, which I've still used as a primary boot drive, but I've still had issues during the updates. This persisted until I've swapped that HDD as well, after which it finally started working as it should.

Does Windows 10 just hate old hardware, or what? Did any of you have similar issues? 

Just curious, have you tried to read your post?  Try inserting a paragraph break in there a couple of times, would make it a LOT easier to understand and read.

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3 hours ago, Methanol Ethanolovicz said:

Unsurprisingly, Windows 10 did what they do best - started installing updates in the least appropriate situation. Of course, he started cursing how Windows 10 sucks, and how Windows 7 was a million times better (which I agree with, btw). This reminded me of the issues I used to have with it.

Windows 10 will force update install if updates are prevented.

That said, you have options to set Active Hours and get Windows 7 style restart window available. Maybe instead of spending all his day cursing, he can check the options of Windows ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 

Quote

Before I built my Ryzen rig, I've tried Windows 10 on my old PC a couple of times during the time you could update to it for free. The PC consisted of Athlon 64 x2 6000+, GeForce 8500 GT, a generic Gigabyte motherboard, couple of old SATA HDDs (128, 256 and 480 GB. They were all split into at least two partitions since I took them from dead PCs, and was too lazy to format them), and 6 GB of RAM (all of the modules were different). I've had all sorts of weird issues with the OS. The most common one, which occurred every time I've tried it was that it couldn't install updates. Every time I've turned the PC on, it started configuring them, got stuck halfway through, and restarted after a few minutes. This process then repeated about 3 times, after which it gave up and said that the update failed and the changes had to be reverted.

They are many reasons for updates to fail, and you have log files. But I have installed and run Windows 10 on older systems than the one listed, however you do have very old HDDs, they could be failing, but another possibility is driver issues, and that is hard to fix, as you have no support.

 

 

Quote

Inother issue I've had when giving it a third try (again accompanied by the first one) was that programs, which worked before, have suddenly not. I wanted to get some school work done one evening, so I fired up ArchiCAD. However, instead of the dialogue window reminding me that I'm using an educational version, I was greeted by an error message saying that this program was not designed to run on Windows. Within a couple of days, most of the programs I'm using started doing this, so I went back to Windows 7 yet again.

Sounds like a bug in the OS version detection system of ArchiCAD. But regardless, the fix is to simply run the program under compatibility mode, and most likely it would have worked.

 

Quote

After I've swapped the 8500 GT with an RX 470, I've decided to give it another try. Once again, the first issue occurred right after I've installed it. However, after a few days, parts of the OS itself stopped working. I was, for example, unable to access the settings, open the power tab or use Edge (not that I've ever used it for anything else than to install Chrome).

Based on you said, as the panels/program you mentioned are all GPU drawn, sounds to me like a GPU driver bug.

 

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3 hours ago, Radium_Angel said:

Windows 10, in my professional experience as an IT admin of over 1000 systems, sucks donkey balls.

Please explain.

 

3 hours ago, Radium_Angel said:

We use the LTSB version which is supposed to be less bloated but goddamn, it's so bad I've sworn off MS for good.

Hmm no, LTSB is not 'less bloated'. LTSB means, Long-term Servicing Branch.

Microsoft has an excellent documentation on this:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-overview

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29 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

Please explain.

 

Hmm no, LTSB is not 'less bloated'. LTSB means, Long-term Servicing Branch.

Microsoft has an excellent documentation on this:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-overview

LTSB is supposed to be for Kiosks and POS systems, and we are supposed to have more control over things like when updates happen, and the store and candy crush and all that shit has been ripped out, but disasters like patch 1809 only further highlight what a disaster Win10 is.

 

As far as explaining, the network chatter win10 does saturates our network, that's problem number one, many of our users have been hit with the disconnecting mapped drive bug, we've had profile corruptions where none existed under Win7 machines. Inexplicable network transfer issues (no, the file isn't in use by me, I've never opened it) the list goes bloody on and on.

 

It's gotten so bad we have to delay patching by several months, while we run a test group of sacrificial systems with the latest patches to see what pukes.

So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

LTSB is supposed to be for Kiosks and POS systems, and we are supposed to have more control over things like when updates happen, and the store and candy crush and all that shit has been ripped out, but disasters like patch 1809 only further highlight what a disaster Win10 is.

No, it is for anything that is more mission critical, where you want reduce possible downtime.

 

23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

As far as explaining, the network chatter win10 does saturates our network,

You should diagnose and see what is causing this, and configure Windows accordingly.

 

23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

many of our users have been hit with the disconnecting mapped drive bug,

So why did you force the upgrade stage?

Issues and update blocks are not public information, including their current state: https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4464619

You should bookmark this page for future references with the following updates.

 

 

23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

we've had profile corruptions where none existed under Win7 machines.

We had this in Win7 when I was working in IT. Easy to fix... In our case, it was Norton's fault. We dropped it (for other issues it was causing as well at the time).

 

23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

Inexplicable network transfer issues (no, the file isn't in use by me, I've never opened it) the list goes bloody on and on.

There is no "inexplicable" anything. Computer follows orders. Check Windows settings. Did you enable Network update share, or P2P update share, or Cloud-deliver protection, automatic sample submission, or OneDrive web? It is all stuff you need to check, and configure Windows accordingly to your environment limitations

 

23 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

It's gotten so bad we have to delay patching by several months, while we run a test group of sacrificial systems with the latest patches to see what pukes.

Why don't you have yourself on the Insider program to get a head up?

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36 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

No, it is for anything that is more mission critical, where you want reduce possible downtime.

 

You should diagnose and see what is causing this, and configure Windows accordingly.

 

So why did you force the upgrade stage?

Issues and update blocks are not public information, including their current state: https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4464619

You should bookmark this page for future references with the following updates.

 

 

We had this in Win7 when I was working in IT. Easy to fix... In our case, it was Norton's fault. We dropped it (for other issues it was causing as well at the time).

 

There is no "inexplicable" anything. Computer follows orders. Check Windows settings. Did you enable Network update share, or P2P update share, or Cloud-deliver protection, automatic sample submission, or OneDrive web? It is all stuff you need to check, and configure Windows accordingly to your environment limitations

 

Why don't you have yourself on the Insider program to get a head up?

The upgrade was forced upon us. I work for a gov't agency...

So some of the command and control is not under our command or control. Much of what I do I can't even talk about (NDA and all that) I would dearly love to move off windows entirely, but it's not in the cards. Too much software tied to things like IE.

 

But that's a topic for another time, and it's not relevant here.

So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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7 hours ago, Radium_Angel said:

The upgrade was forced upon us. I work for a gov't agency...

So then you are not on the LTSB or someone screwed up with the configurations. If you have 1809 update then you are the current branch, the same branch that consumers are on.

 

7 hours ago, Radium_Angel said:

So some of the command and control is not under our command or control. Much of what I do I can't even talk about (NDA and all that) I would dearly love to move off windows entirely, but it's not in the cards. Too much software tied to things like IE.

Software support will be the least of your problems. If you think that the grass is greener on the other side, than you need to checkout some case studies. Let's just say that governments and companies who have done the switch ran back to Windows. And in terms of money.. well.. I can use where I work, We spend more on Linux support than if you were to switch everything to Windows. But we can't. Windows Server doesn't allows us to do what we need to do properly. That is for our back-end.

 

7 hours ago, Radium_Angel said:

But that's a topic for another time, and it's not relevant here.

All I can say, is before jumping to conclusions quickly, that maybe something or somethings are not properly configured. Microsoft has massive documentations at ones disposable. Maybe a bit too much where people don't know where to start looking, especially when things are split between docs and MS blogs articles.

 

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