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Trying to decide on HEDT CPU

MrCupHolder
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My current system is using an i7-4820K and a little bit back a I got a good deal on RAM so now it has 64GB. 

I wish to turn this system into my lab machine and it will run either VMWare or MS Server with Hyper V and run multiple VMs and will replace my i7-2600K with 32GB RAM

 

So that means upgrading my current desktop with thought in mind that eventually it will turn into my lab machine. To that end I've been looking at socket 2066 CPU's because with the right motherboard they will allow for 128GB RAM (or more, I heard rumor of 32GB DDR4 DIMMs). I obviously won't purchase that much right away. But it does mean that when time comes and the i7-4820K no longer cuts the mustard as a lab machine I'll be able to move the socket 2066 system into its place.

 

So the question is what CPU do I purchase?

 

Note: All prices in Australian Dollars

 

i7-7820X - New $869 - Used on forum $500 4.8GHz at 1.275V (Not delidded)

i9 7900X - New $1449 - Used on forum $900 4.8GHz (Not delidded)

i7 9800X - New $999

i9 9900X - New $1549

 

It is my intention to cool these using a Noctua NH-D14 that I already own and I wouldn't look to de-lidding any of the 7000 series CPU's.

I don't know what coolers were used to reach the over clock on the advertised used parts. Does anyone have experience cooling any of those parts with an air cooler same or similar to the NH-D14? I'd be happy to run at stock if the NH-D14 will do the job.

 

I do game, I have a GTX 980 (not Ti, I used to have SLI but that's another story) and use a 4K screen.

I run VM's on my main desktop machine from time to time as well as on the Lab computer.

I do also do photo editting and the occasional video edit. So with those thoughts in mind I guess an 8 core would probably do fine and I would rarely benefit from an extra 2 cores in a 10 core chip.

 

I've not bought used before, is there anything I should look out for when buying a CPU used?

 

Also am I better off going with a 9000 series being they have the STIM considering that I wouldn't delid a 7000 anyway?

IIRC 7000 series run hotter with stock TIM vs  9000 series, but 7000 series run cooler than 9000 if the 7000 is de-lidded.

 

 

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tbh, just go 9000 series. Longer drivers, longer lifespan (because newer), and hella fast 

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32GB unregistered sticks will need extra support on the boards, so let's say you can't get 32GB UDIMMs

 

but how RAM and CPU heavy are your apps? Any significant advantage on Intel CPUs compared to AMD's Ryzen? I mean, Ryzen CPUs cost half as much for the same core count so you can buy more memory instead.

CPU: i7-2600K 4751MHz 1.44V (software) --> 1.47V at the back of the socket Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4 (BCLK: 103.3MHz) CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 RAM: Adata XPG 2x8GB DDR3 (XMP: 2133MHz 10-11-11-30 CR2, custom: 2203MHz 10-11-10-26 CR1 tRFC:230 tREFI:14000) GPU: Asus GTX 1070 Dual (Super Jetstream vbios, +70(2025-2088MHz)/+400(8.8Gbps)) SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB (main boot drive), Transcend SSD370 128GB PSU: Seasonic X-660 80+ Gold Case: Antec P110 Silent, 5 intakes 1 exhaust Monitor: AOC G2460PF 1080p 144Hz (150Hz max w/ DP, 121Hz max w/ HDMI) TN panel Keyboard: Logitech G610 Orion (Cherry MX Blue) with SteelSeries Apex M260 keycaps Mouse: BenQ Zowie FK1

 

Model: HP Omen 17 17-an110ca CPU: i7-8750H (0.125V core & cache, 50mV SA undervolt) GPU: GTX 1060 6GB Mobile (+80/+450, 1650MHz~1750MHz 0.78V~0.85V) RAM: 8+8GB DDR4-2400 18-17-17-39 2T Storage: 1TB HP EX920 PCIe x4 M.2 SSD + 1TB Seagate 7200RPM 2.5" HDD (ST1000LM049-2GH172), 128GB Toshiba PCIe x2 M.2 SSD (KBG30ZMV128G) gone cooking externally Monitor: 1080p 126Hz IPS G-sync

 

Desktop benching:

Cinebench R15 Single thread:168 Multi-thread: 833 

SuperPi (v1.5 from Techpowerup, PI value output) 16K: 0.100s 1M: 8.255s 32M: 7m 45.93s

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Given similar clocks and the fact that all the cpu have the same lithography, heat output is a function of core count.

 

It seems to me that the choice comes down to how many cores would be best when the box moves to the lab. 

 

The majority of X299 motherboards have 8 memory slots and support 128GB using 16GB DIMMs.

 

There are persistent rumors of one, possibly two new chipsets for Intel HEDT cpu.

80+ ratings certify electrical efficiency. Not quality.

 

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You super sure threadripper?

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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15 hours ago, BOBWARPATH said:

tbh, just go 9000 series. Longer drivers, longer lifespan (because newer), and hella fast 

I would have expected the drivers to be the same being both 7000 and 9000 series CPU's are the same architecture, just an improvement in manufacturing process that means they're getting higher clocks on the 9000's

 

14 hours ago, Jurrunio said:

32GB unregistered sticks will need extra support on the boards, so let's say you can't get 32GB UDIMMs

 

but how RAM and CPU heavy are your apps? Any significant advantage on Intel CPUs compared to AMD's Ryzen? I mean, Ryzen CPUs cost half as much for the same core count so you can buy more memory instead.

Note that I'm not planning on getting the 128GB RAM now. I'm future proofing to allow for buying 128GB DDR4 ram when it hits rock bottom price. My intention is to make the 4820K system with 64GB Ram my lab computer which will run multiple VM's under either MS Server Hyper V or VMware. When 64GB is no longer enough then I'll migrate the socket 2066 system to being the lab machine and with 128GB Ram

My current lab machine is a i7 2600K with 32GB Ram and it's not cutting the mustard. Hence wanting to replace it with the 4820K with 64GB. When I first purchased the 4820K 5 years ago I bought the 32GB RAM and put it into the 2600K and moved the 4x4GB kit into the 4820K. I then kept an eye on RAM prices and managed to get 64GB (8x8GB) for AU$300. Buying RAM is like the stock market. You watch it come down and eventually it becomes rare and then starts going up. So you have to keep and eye out and buy at the right time which I feel I did.

 

Ryzen's costing half as much doesn't matter when  you're not buying the RAM now. Being this will be a lab machine and run VMware and Windows Server I've had better experience with consumer CPU's on Intel side running those server platforms. Same reason as I'll be selecting a motherboard that has 2x Intel NIC on it because again I've had issue with other 3rd party NIC's not being supported in VMWare

 

14 hours ago, brob said:

Given similar clocks and the fact that all the cpu have the same lithography, heat output is a function of core count.

 

It seems to me that the choice comes down to how many cores would be best when the box moves to the lab. 

 

The majority of X299 motherboards have 8 memory slots and support 128GB using 16GB DIMMs.

 

There are persistent rumors of one, possibly two new chipsets for Intel HEDT cpu.

Yeah I've heard different things too. I'm wondering if it's the new chipset that would allow for 32GB DIMMs, however I'm also wondering if there will be a change in socket. But then how far away is all that. If there's a new chipset that will support 7000 and 9000 CPU's and allow for 32GB DIMMs that would be great, but I'm not holding my breath. If a simple BIOS upgrade would allow for 32GB DIMMs that would be even better.

 

How many cores, yeah considering when the socket 2066 machine becomes a lab machine I see RAM being more my issue. I might run a dozen or more VM's but because I won't have 100 user's hitting them, only myself even if I've setup a few desktops to hit the system I don't see myself really taxing it.

 

So yeah with all this consideration I'm thinking 8 core will be enough.

 

14 hours ago, fasauceome said:

You super sure threadripper?

Do you just like the sound of your own voice? Or are you a fanboy?

Your such short response isn't really useful. All you've done is answer a question with another question. How about provide a real answer?

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8 hours ago, MrCupHolder said:

Do you just like the sound of your own voice? Or are you a fanboy?

Your such short response isn't really useful. All you've done is answer a question with another question. How about provide a real answer

I just realized now that I must have blanked really hard when typing that because it doesn't even make any sense, it's missing words. What I meant to say was "you sure you don't want threadripper?" Because I wasn't sure if it was out of budget due to bad availability or it lacked a feature you needed like thunderbolt

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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On 12/18/2018 at 8:04 AM, BOBWARPATH said:

tbh, just go 9000 series. Longer drivers, longer lifespan (because newer), and hella fast 

The drivers are for the motherboards, which are not newer, and the microarchitectures are identical, so the lifespan is the same for both parts.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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