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Look ma, no radiator fans

BHJohnson
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I finished a proof of concept for using a water cooling loop that cools the GPU and CPU, sealing up the case with the exception of the intakes for the fans and the exhaust for the top mounted 420 mm radiator, and turning off the radiator fans to try lowering overall noise signature. The result is that it works. My sealing job was fairly rough, I took a lot of short cuts with electric tape instead of actual gaskets, there are no gaskets on the fans whatsoever, I only turned the radiator fans off but didn't remove them, there's still some fairly good sized holes that I just ignored because I'm impatient, so there's a lot of both cosmetic and functional things that can be better about the idea, but it works. 20 minutes into a stress test and I'm sitting at a steady 70 C on the CPU, which is the hottest part of this system by a long shot. With a GPU and CPU stress test going simultaneously, temps on the CPU were about 77 C, which is warmer than with fans definitely, but again this was a quick and dirty test just to proof of concept the idea. Turning off the GPU stress test but leaving prime95 running, temperatures on the CPU came back down, proving that the system is removing heat and it's not just the thermal capacity of the coolant absorbing the heat input. I have no idea if I will tweak this idea in or what I will do with this information, but I feel satisfied having proven it can be done.

 

Side note, I really wish this board came with VRM temperature sensors.

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Cool. Sounds like the large mass of the radiator is helping to hold in heat so I think it might get hotter

8086k

aorus pro z390

noctua nh-d15s chromax w black cover

evga 3070 ultra

samsung 128gb, adata swordfish 1tb, wd blue 1tb

seasonic 620w dogballs psu

 

 

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15 minutes ago, GoldenLag said:

you shure you reached thermal equalibrium?

This - it takes longer than 20 minutes

Workstation Laptop: Dell Precision 7540, Xeon E-2276M, 32gb DDR4, Quadro T2000 GPU, 4k display

Ryzen Rig 3: ASRock B450m Pro4, Ryzen 5 3600, ARESGAME River 5 CPU cooler in push/pull, EVGA RTX 2060 KO, 16gb (2x8) 3600mhz TeamGroup T-Force RAM, ARESGAME AGV750w PSU, 1tb WD Black SN750 NVMe Win 10 boot drive, 3tb Hitachi 7200 RPM HDD, Fractal Design Focus G Mini custom painted.  Lenovo 27" 1080p 60hz placeholder monitor, generic mouse, generic keyboard.  Still a work in progress

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 video card benchmark result - AMD Ryzen 5 3600,ASRock B450M Pro4 (3dmark.com)

Ryzen Rig 2: ASrock B450 Pro4, Ryzen 7 1700 @ 4.2ghz all core 1.4vCore, AMD R9 Fury X w/ Swiftech KOMODO waterblock, Custom Loop 2x240mm + 1x120mm radiators in push/pull 16gb (2x8) 3600mhz V-Color Skywalker (or 4x8gb DDR4 2666mhz for large tasks), Corsair HX850 PSU, 250gb Samsun 960 EVO NVMe Win 10 boot drive, 500gb Samsung 840 EVO SSD, 512GB TeamGroup MP30 M.2 SATA III SSD, SuperTalent 512gb SATA III SSD, CoolerMaster HAF XM Case.  Zalman K600S keyboard, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Viotek GN24C 24" 1080p 144hz curved and Hannspree HF207 as 2nd monitor

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37004594?

Ryzen Rig 1: ASUS B350-PRIME ATX, Ryzen 7 1700, Sapphire R9 Fury Tri-X Nitro 4gb HBM, 16gb (2x8) 3200mhz V-Color Skywalker, ANTEC Earthwatts 750w PSU, MasterLiquid Lite 120 AIO cooler in Push/Pull config as rear exhaust, 250gb Samsung 850 Evo SSD, Patriot Burst 240gb SSD, Cougar MX330-X Case.  Zalman K600S keyboard, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Acer XF270HU 2560x1440 144hz IPS monitor

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37628874?

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49 minutes ago, BHJohnson said:

I finished a proof of concept for using a water cooling loop that cools the GPU and CPU, sealing up the case with the exception of the intakes for the fans and the exhaust for the top mounted 420 mm radiator, and turning off the radiator fans to try lowering overall noise signature. The result is that it works. My sealing job was fairly rough, I took a lot of short cuts with electric tape instead of actual gaskets, there are no gaskets on the fans whatsoever, I only turned the radiator fans off but didn't remove them, there's still some fairly good sized holes that I just ignored because I'm impatient, so there's a lot of both cosmetic and functional things that can be better about the idea, but it works. 20 minutes into a stress test and I'm sitting at a steady 70 C on the CPU, which is the hottest part of this system by a long shot. With a GPU and CPU stress test going simultaneously, temps on the CPU were about 77 C, which is warmer than with fans definitely, but again this was a quick and dirty test just to proof of concept the idea. Turning off the GPU stress test but leaving prime95 running, temperatures on the CPU came back down, proving that the system is removing heat and it's not just the thermal capacity of the coolant absorbing the heat input. I have no idea if I will tweak this idea in or what I will do with this information, but I feel satisfied having proven it can be done.

 

Side note, I really wish this board came with VRM temperature sensors.

You do know that you can get some 800 rpm fans that are basically inaudible right? Meaning you could increase the cooling capacity on the rad a good bit while also keeping the system completely quiet.

 

Here are some common items compared to sound levels. Keep in mind the average ambient noise level in a home can be around 8-12 DB sometimes more.

 

dBA Example Home & Yard Appliances Workshop & Construction
0 healthy hearing threshold    
10 a pin dropping    
20 rustling leaves    
30 whisper    
40 babbling brook computer  
50 light traffic refrigerator  
60 conversational speech air conditioner  
70 shower dishwasher  
75 toilet flushing vacuum cleaner  
80 alarm clock garbage disposal  

 

A list of a few good options.

  Name Price Airflow (CFM) Noise (dBA) Max speed (RPM)  
  Noctua NF-S12B REDUX 700 £12.96 33.5 6.8 700  
  Scythe Slip Stream 500 £9.18 24.5 7.5 500  
  Coolink SWiF2-120 £10.00 35.5 8.5 800  
  Noctua NF-S12A ULN £17.45 43.7 8.6 800  
  Noctua NF-A12x25 ULN £26.44 32.8 12.1 1200  
  Nanoxia DS 120mm Fan £9.29 60.1 14.2 1300  
  Scythe Kaze Flex 120mm 800 £9.47 43.0 14.5 800  
  be quiet SW3 120mm 3pin BL064 £18.37 50.5 16.4 1450  
  be quiet SW3 120mm PWM BL066 £18.42 50.5 16.4

1450

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I'm also slightly skeptical a radiator is effective for passive cooling because in order for passive cooling to be effective, the radiating fins have to be spread apart further. If they're close together as in most forced convection coolers, it's harder for air to naturally flow through it.

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6 minutes ago, M.Yurizaki said:

I'm also slightly skeptical a radiator is effective for passive cooling because in order for passive cooling to be effective, the radiating fins have to be spread apart further. If they're close together as in most forced convection coolers, it's harder for air to naturally flow through it.

Agreed. The only time I have seen a fanless rad setup that actually did a decent job it was geothermal and they were burying the radiator in dirt to disperse the heat.

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It's not actually passive cooling, there's still fans pressurizing the case to push air out the radiator. I contemplated trying passive cooling, but you either need a different heat sink (the Earth or similar), or you need a wicked high delta T to create enough driving head to get enough air to flow, making passive cooling impractical or ineffective. Possibly for a very low power system like a stock clocked APU that you're OK with operating at very high temperatures, but even then I would have doubts. I won't be trying it.

 

And reaching thermal equilibrium was part of the reason I turned on the GPU stress test in addition to the CPU stress test to warm the loop up faster. Turning off the second stress test caused temperature to go down, which means more thermal energy was leaving than going in. The CPU stress test ran for another two hours and held steady, so yes, I'm going to call that equilibrium given it's only a 140 mL reservoir and doesn't have that much mass to heat up.

 

I acknowledge this isn't really a practical idea, this is more just a neat proof of concept that I'm actually fairly surprised worked.

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