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Shooting in the snow

Hey guys,
I'm planning on bringing my Mark III with me on snowboarding trip. Any tips for shooting in the cold? Another forum mentioned keeping the camera in a plastic bag to avoid condensation when going from cold to hot... any other ones?
Any advice would be appreciated in advance and thanks in advance!

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Remember that cold temperatures can greatly reduce battery life. Also, reflection of the sun off snow can make it very bright.

Hello there, fellow dark theme users

"Be excellent to each other and party on dudes." - Abraham Lincoln    #wiiumasterrace

 

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DSLR should be fine in winter. You can leave them outside for a while till it reach ambient before using it.

Some component will be affected by the cold. Screen will be less responsive and battery will discharge faster. Use viewfinder and bring more spare battery.

Get a pair of gloves that is easy for you to operate the camera while also protect you from the cold.

Snow is highly reflective. Configure white balance and exposure to compensate for that.

When done shooting, put the camera in a dry chamber or plastic bag to slowly warm up to room temperature. There will be a few droplets but they will evaporate eventually.

One last off topic thing, a DSLR on a snowboarding trip? Shouldn't that be suiting case for an action camera, like a GoPro?

"Mankind’s greatest mistake will be its inability to control the technology it has created."

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7 hours ago, SkyHound0202 said:

DSLR should be fine in winter. You can leave them outside for a while till it reach ambient before using it.

Some component will be affected by the cold. Screen will be less responsive and battery will discharge faster. Use viewfinder and bring more spare battery.

Get a pair of gloves that is easy for you to operate the camera while also protect you from the cold.

Snow is highly reflective. Configure white balance and exposure to compensate for that.

When done shooting, put the camera in a dry chamber or plastic bag to slowly warm up to room temperature. There will be a few droplets but they will evaporate eventually.

One last off topic thing, a DSLR on a snowboarding trip? Shouldn't that be suiting case for an action camera, like a GoPro?

I'm interested in getting shots of the mountains and my friends going down the slopes, so a go pro doesn't really suit my needs and I want more lenses so I can't spend the money on that haha

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Filters are usually a great idea for these sort of landscapes. A Polariser is the only must, anything else can in some way be done in post, just research a bit so you know what shots you need (HDRs etc.)

 

If you will be shooting friends skiing, as with any fast action sport, master your camera's AF system for that purpose and scout out good locations to shoot from on the track from beforehand, do your research before shooting, it helps a lot. 

 

Put a UV filter on your lens. My first time using an SLR I slipped and broke my lenses filter threads, which is kind of annoying. It shouldn't be an issue with metal or higher quality lenses, but its good to keep in mind. although you may have to clean between the lens and filter a bit often due to condensation getting in there. 

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15 hours ago, BlackUnicornGaming said:

 

sorry man i didnt know there was a camera with the same model number :(

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My suggestions would be:

 

1) bring a circular polarising filter to help cut the glare off the snow. Also, use a lens hood if you have one.

 

2 Keep your battery in an inside pocket to keep it warm until you're ready to shoot. After shooting, put it back in that inside pocket to keep it warm if it's going to be a while (an hour or so) until the next shoot. I'd bring a spare battery if you have one since the cold really saps battery life.

 

3) Give your gear time to cool down to the ambient temperature. Try to avoid going from a warm inside environment to a cold outside environment. Sudden temperature changes can negatively impact your lens and, if the temperature difference is extreme enough, can potentially crack lens elements. If your gear is warm, keep it in its camera bag when you go outside for a while so it can cool down. If your gear is cold, keep it in the bag when you come inside to let it warm up slowly (or to keep it cool while you grab lunch so you can go back outside and shoot without worrying). I put my camera (in its camera bag) in the trunk of my car while I drive to the mountains so that it's already cooled down before I take it out and start using it.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/17/2018 at 10:48 AM, BlackUnicornGaming said:

wear a jacket :)

I was going to say wear gloves. Went out with a buddy to film a music video and by the end both of our hands were frozen stiff.

#Muricaparrotgang

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