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How to avoid static when building pc?

Brad275
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I am pretty new when it comes to building a pc. I know you shouldn't build on carpet, but I was wondering if it would be okay to build on my bathroom counter top? 

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Why bathroom? Seems too much room for error near a toilet or sink. I've built a lot of PCs on carpet, it's fine. Touch a metal object like a faucet, coat rack, or metal table leg to release static from your body every now and then.

 

I also zapped a 680 that ended up still working, really stopped my heart for a sec.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

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i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

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How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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5 minutes ago, Brad275 said:

I am pretty new when it comes to building a pc. I know you shouldn't build on carpet, but I was wondering if it would be okay to build on my bathroom counter top? 

No. You must be build your PC on the air.

 

 

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Honestly, not something I've ever had issues with. I've built and rebuilt my computer so many times just on the sheet on my bed, and there's been zero issues. I usually just wash my hands before hand to dissipate any static, wear latex gloves to prevent oils from getting on the components, and avoid touching anything I don't need to. If you were super worried about it, I'd use one of the solid side-panels of your case, and rest your components on the inside of it. Just touch the panel first any time you go to grab something, and it'll be fine.

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To be safe, just get one of those anti-static wrist straps that you connect to a ground (electrical ground, not the thing that stops you from being pulled into the molten core of the earth). I've seen people use rubber gloves and I'm pretty sure that'll work too and give you a tiny bit of protection for being sliced.

8086k

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2 hours ago, Brad275 said:

I am pretty new when it comes to building a pc. I know you shouldn't build on carpet, but I was wondering if it would be okay to build on my bathroom counter top? 

 

Moisture is as much an enemy of electronics. Build on a solid surface and use a decent anti-static strap. One end of the strap is designed to go around a wrist or ankle and has a metal bud that should stay in contact with skin. The other end needs to be attached to a ground.

 

The simplest way of establishing a ground is to mount the psu in the case. Make sure the switch on the back of the psu is in the off position. Plug the psu into a grounded power outlet. Then the psu and metal portions of the case are grounded so you can attach the alligator clip at one end of the strap to a metal portion of the case.

80+ ratings certify electrical efficiency. Not quality.

 

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