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Microsoft open-sourced Windows Forms, WinUI and WPF

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Source:
https://blogs.windows.com/buildingapps/2018/12/04/announcing-open-source-of-wpf-windows-forms-and-winui-at-microsoft-connect-2018/

Quote

At Build 2018, I outlined our approach to helping you be more productive when developing apps, including the introduction of .NET Core 3.0. We also started decoupling many parts of the Windows development platform, so you can adopt technologies incrementally. Today at Microsoft Connect(); 2018 Conference we shared the next steps – specifically to support innovations in UI:

  1. .NET Core 3.0 Preview 1 adds support for building client apps using Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), Windows Forms, and XAML Islands.
  2. WPF, Windows Forms, and Windows UI XAML Library (WinUI) are now open source, so you can create experiences with the freedom you want.

WPF, Windows Forms, and WinUI ready for your contributions

This journey is our continued commitment to creating the development platform with you, through open source. Our three, popular Windows UX frameworks are ready for your contributions on GitHub: WPFWindows Forms, and WinUI. Open sourcing these technologies provides transparency between the product team and the community, helps democratize Windows development, and enables the community to engage and contribute to these repos.

 


There are the github links!: 
https://github.com/dotnet/winformshttps://github.com/Microsoft/microsoft-ui-xaml
https://github.com/dotnet/wpf

Well, I'm very happy about that, even though I would like to see more core parts of Windows open sourced as well, I think that open sourcing is a good way to spare money for companies having work done by other people, and maybe that could lead to the end of the Windows 10 releases issues, which are in my opinion too much hasty, including more people in the Insider program obviously. Maybe like releasing source code only to them? Could be a great idea too imo. They are doing too many projects, and they seem like they don't have time to fix all those issues, again open sourcing is another way to solve those issues.
Could also been the reason they did that, open sourcing some things in order to have less resources to focus on.

For the ones who don't know, Windows Forms is the primary Widget interface that is always been used in the Windows OS, something like GTK or QT. 
Risultati immagini per win32 windows form api
What could happen now? 
Well, it isn't known to be "very portable" on other systems, but now it could be integrated on the Mono project, (an entirely open source .NET compliant framework which is cross-platform) and that could lead to more compatibility and code portability on other systems like MacOS or Linux (Just speaking of GUI widgets) 
Not sure about that, but that could also mean that projects like Wine could offer better compatibility to Windows.form apps 

Don't know that much of WPF and WinUI, but WinUI is another GUI widget that is used to give a metro-like look to apps, like Edge or the new Paint 3D.
Immagine correlata
While WPF don't know actually. Stands for windows presentation foundation.
 

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They were relying on users to beta test the OS, now they want them to code for them too?

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So basically at this point they just give up fixing their own mess by open-sourcing a bunch of stuff so we now have to fix it?

Like, i really don't get why they open-source this stuff. Maybe a dev can explain?

If you want my attention, quote meh! D: or just stick an @samcool55 in your post :3

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Just now, samcool55 said:

So basically at this point they just give up fixing their own mess by open-sourcing a bunch of stuff so we now have to fix it?

Just like the Linux community!

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Well, this is certainly interesting. I think the biggest thing to come from this? Someone is going to have a "Linux that looks like Windows" version eventually. 

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9 minutes ago, samcool55 said:

So basically at this point they just give up fixing their own mess by open-sourcing a bunch of stuff so we now have to fix it?

Like, i really don't get why they open-source this stuff. Maybe a dev can explain?

Like Google with Chrome (well the engine) and many of its other projects. It is open source, but they are the active/main contributors, and they decide the direction of the project.

The idea is that you have the code open for others to participate and make the platform more relevant.

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3 minutes ago, M.Yurizaki said:

Huh, apparently the rendering engine Edge uses was meant to be compatible with Blink and Webkit anyways (https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2015/06/17/building-a-more-interoperable-web-with-microsoft-edge/)

 

So basically, the rendering engine is redundant at this point.

Wrong thread? But no. What they mean is that the engine support everything (as a goal) Blink and Webkit. In other words, it won't re-invent the internet, and design the engine to behave as close as possible to theses engines.

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1 minute ago, GoodBytes said:

Wrong thread? But no. What they mean is that the engine support everything (as a goal) Blink and Webkit. In other words, it won't re-invent the internet, and design the engine to behave as close as possible to theses engines.

Oh yeah, wrong thread. I can't keep up with this place.

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7 minutes ago, Taf the Ghost said:

Well, this is certainly interesting. I think the biggest thing to come from this? Someone is going to have a "Linux that looks like Windows" version eventually. 

From what I understand, people have been saying Linux has been becoming more like Windows, I mean Windows certainly is becoming more like Linux, look at the UWP Store on Windows 10, it's very akin to the Software Centre on something like Ubuntu. I guess the main difference between OS now is updates and performance and Windows 10 has had some bad updates and generally runs slower than a lot of Linux distros.

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3 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

Like Google with Chrome (well the engine) and many of its other projects. It is open source, but they are the active/main contributors, and they decide the direction of the project.

The idea is that you have the code open for others to participate and make the platform more relevant.

Well, Chrome isn't open source but Chromium is. But I see what you mean.

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Also, holy crap. I hope this means that Mono gets an implementation of WPF and WinForms running across platforms in the future.

 

The Xamarin Team is already bringing WPF to Linux but hopefully this should speed up development and offer more features and compatibility.


Edit: Also obligatory post about how Microsoft has now put these 3 technologies in the "Extinguish" phase of the three Es.

Judge a product on its own merits AND the company that made it.

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6 minutes ago, ZacoAttaco said:

From what I understand, people have been saying Linux has been becoming more like Windows, I mean Windows certainly is becoming more like Linux, look at the UWP Store on Windows 10, it's very akin to the Software Centre on something like Ubuntu. I guess the main difference between OS now is updates and performance and Windows 10 has had some bad updates and generally runs slower than a lot of Linux distros.

There's always been a lot of convergence with the OSes. As much as everyone ended up, in the old days, with their favorites, the reality of the GUI over a backend is pretty straight forward. It's really just libraries, binaries and execution approaches, at the end of it all. Though the main thing has always just been the payment model. MS produced a product "good enough" and supported it for the "normal" user. 

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2 minutes ago, Taf the Ghost said:

There's always been a lot of convergence with the OSes. As much as everyone ended up, in the old days, with their favorites, the reality of the GUI over a backend is pretty straight forward. It's really just libraries, binaries and execution approaches, at the end of it all. Though the main thing has always just been the payment model. MS produced a product "good enough" and supported it for the "normal" user. 

When I started using Ubuntu, I'm still very new to Linux, I was surprised at how similar it was to macOS as opposed to Windows. It was very snappy and responsive. I prefer Windows at the moment, but Microsoft really need to step up their game with their updates and I think Windows can still go along way. It's far from a perfect operating system. Maybe this is a step in the right direction? 

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2 minutes ago, ZacoAttaco said:

When I started using Ubuntu, I'm still very new to Linux, I was surprised at how similar it was to macOS as opposed to Windows. It was very snappy and responsive. I prefer Windows at the moment, but Microsoft really need to step up their game with their updates and I think Windows can still go along way. It's far from a perfect operating system. Maybe this is a step in the right direction? 

Unless you were there, you don't realize how important the Start Menu actually was. Everyone has just been trying to make a better version since. Which is why, at the end of it all, everyone just has slightly different Designs over extremely similar approaches. MacOS and Windows are just designed to be as functional as possible for non-technical people. Sometimes it works well, and some times you get Windows 8.

 

But that's the front-end. The back-ends are very different, which is the one thing MS has always had problems with. They made compromises for years to get Windows established that they kept having to carry those forward. They never got "ahead" of their issues on the back-end parts of the OS. Probably never will.

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9 minutes ago, ZacoAttaco said:

When I started using Ubuntu, I'm still very new to Linux, I was surprised at how similar it was to macOS as opposed to Windows. It was very snappy and responsive. I prefer Windows at the moment, but Microsoft really need to step up their game with their updates and I think Windows can still go along way. It's far from a perfect operating system. Maybe this is a step in the right direction? 

Is it but it also isn't, lacks in hardware acceleration feature especially in browsers, also full 144Hz support cause lack of development from vendors.
And has also issues on dual-gpu laptops (the most common) which neither nvidia or someone is going to solve it quickly 

Except those issues yes, is responsive. Is a traditional OS like Windows 7 was and MacOS, and linux desktops are more complete and good-looking.

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3 minutes ago, Lukyp said:

Is it but it also isn't, lacks in hardware acceleration feature especially in browsers, also full 144Hz support cause lack of development from vendors.
And has also issues on dual-gpu laptops (the most common) which neither nvidia or someone is going to solve it quickly 

Except those issues yes, is responsive. Is a traditional OS like Windows 7 was and MacOS, and linux desktops are more complete and good-looking.

Yeah well you helped me out with issues with dedicated graphics and the default AMD Radeon drivers on Ubuntu so I can attest to annoying graphics drivers at least. I feel like Ubuntu on a laptop would almost be better for someone new, you wouldn't run into many driver issues off the bat, I'm trying to get an old Macbook to run it but we'll see.

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3 hours ago, samcool55 said:

So basically at this point they just give up fixing their own mess by open-sourcing a bunch of stuff so we now have to fix it?

Like, i really don't get why they open-source this stuff. Maybe a dev can explain?

 

3 hours ago, GoodBytes said:

Like Google with Chrome (well the engine) and many of its other projects. It is open source, but they are the active/main contributors, and they decide the direction of the project.

The idea is that you have the code open for others to participate and make the platform more relevant.

Absolutely this ^

Also the same applies for the Linux Kernel, there are some guys including Linus Torvalds itself checking every commit someone makes in the mainline kernel, they even used to give f*cks to big companies if the code was completely a mess, the linux kernel code itself is also full of blasphemy lol (this recently has changed but whatever)

 

3 hours ago, Drak3 said:

Just like the Linux community!


Don't understand the joke tbh, most of the linux community is just blinded to basic "guides" the found on the ubuntu forum or on the internet, and they'll use an OS without knowing how it actually works and/or just by following an elitary philosophy like Stallman, and if you have a problem most of them don't know actually why are those happening and what is the cause without just telling you to do terminal commands they found on an ancient "X" site... Something like that, that isn't clearly going to work, unless someone actually knows what's going on

If you meant the open source software on linux is the buggiest that's actually the opposite, vendors used to make their drivers proprietary and there wasn't a single time it just worked fine without issues, open source ones are actually the ones more reliable for obvious reasons.


 

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Soon we will not need Linux anymore? O3O

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12 hours ago, GoodBytes said:

Like Google with Chrome (well the engine)

chromium right? and that's not just an engine, it's a full browser...

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this is in all aspects good. the more they open-source, the more the Linux community can use, and the less we need Windows :) 

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13 hours ago, samcool55 said:

Like, i really don't get why they open-source this stuff. Maybe a dev can explain?

Probably just want to get some PR.

 

 

Here is a statement in their contribution guide:

Quote

Most .NET Core components are cross-platform and we appreciate contributions that either improve their feature set in a given environment or that add support for a new environment. We will typically not accept contributions that implement support for an OS-specific technolology on another operating system. For example, we do not intend to create an implementation of the Windows registry for Linux or an implementation of the macOS keychain for Windows. We also do not intend to accept contributions that provide cross-platform implementations for Windows Forms or WPF.

Emphasis mine.

 

So while WinForms and WPF are now open source, Microsoft will not implement changes which makes them work on for example GNU/Linux in the main branch.

Someone could fork it implement the changes themselves, but then we get a total mess with two competing forks which have different feature sets for different platforms (that is, assuming someone even wants to take on the burden of maintaining the fork).

 

On top of that, a lot of the underlying things are still closed source. For example WPF uses DirectX for rendering. So while WPF might be open source, it won't have anything to hook into on GNU/Linux unless DirectX is supported too.

 

I think the biggest win here is that now we might get WPF implemented in mono. Previously they didn't implement that because it was deemed too large of a project, and there wasn't much interest in it from developers to begin with.

They might also be able to clean up some WinForms bugs.

 

 

It's nice that they have open sourced it, but their policies are still "problematic" and I think these types of announcements lead people to believe things like "soon we'll have Windows programs running natively on GNU/Linux". Microsoft still has a very large and thick wall preventing that from happening anytime soon, and I doubt they will ever tear it down. Doesn't make sense from a business perspective.

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15 hours ago, Drak3 said:

Just like the Linux community!

Except Linux is free and so are it's applications.

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