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what the heck happened to Broadwell?

mxk
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When my brother almost got a hold of a x99 strix board, he planned to get a 6800k which was broadwell, not skylake, despite having the "6" in front of it. Also, I heard someone else say "rip an entire generation", and this got me wondering, what happened to broadwell? Why did they reuse the "6"? I'm just really curious and hoping some people could answer.

8086k

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the generation and core time aren't always the same.

 

Broadwell was on the desktop with the 5775c and the 5765c, but there very rare, and clocked low.

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They used 6xxx because the Extreme Edition CPUs are always a number ahead of the consumer grade.

 

5960X was 4th gen, 4960X was 3rd gen, 3960X was 2nd gen. 7820X was technically Skylake.

6800K/6950X was Broadwell-E, which was the 14nm shrink of Haswell(4th gen). Still technically 4th gen, but essentially Broadwell was the name given to Haswell+++(we went from Haswell > Devil's Canyon > Broadwell, so three generations).

 

In similar fashion to Skylake, Kaby Lake, and Coffee Lake; we got 3 "generations" of Haswell.

There was a 5th generation, that most people don't know/don't remember.

 

That architecture was officially named Broadwell. Most of those chips were used in laptops, with very few ever reaching the desktop platform. Some do exist though, like the Core i7-5775C: https://ark.intel.com/products/88040/Intel-Core-i7-5775C-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3-70-GHz-

 

The difference between Broadwell and Broadwell-E is that Broadwell-E was on the X99 platform, not Z97. Aside from Broadwell barely reaching the desktop platform, the two generations went exactly as normal for Intel generations.

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1 minute ago, Crunchy Dragon said:

They used 6xxx because the Extreme Edition CPUs are always a number ahead of the consumer grade.

 

5960X was 4th gen, 4960X was 3rd gen, 3960X was 2nd gen. 7820X was technically Skylake.

6800K/6950X was Broadwell-E, which was the 14nm shrink of Haswell(4th gen). Still technically 4th gen, but essentially Broadwell was the name given to Haswell+++(we went from Haswell > Devil's Canyon > Broadwell, so three generations).

 

In similar fashion to Skylake, Kaby Lake, and Coffee Lake; we got 3 "generations" of Haswell.

There was a 5th generation, that most people don't know/don't remember.

 

That architecture was officially named Broadwell. Most of those chips were used in laptops, with very few ever reaching the desktop platform. Some do exist though, like the Core i7-5775C: https://ark.intel.com/products/88040/Intel-Core-i7-5775C-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3-70-GHz-

 

The difference between Broadwell and Broadwell-E is that Broadwell-E was on the X99 platform, not Z97. Aside from Broadwell barely reaching the desktop platform, the two generations went exactly as normal for Intel generations.

wow! This makes much more sense and why it was on x99 along with the extreme stuff. Thanks!

8086k

aorus pro z390

noctua nh-d15s chromax w black cover

evga 3070 ultra

samsung 128gb, adata swordfish 1tb, wd blue 1tb

seasonic 620w dogballs psu

 

 

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IMO Broadwell was a huge disappointment, perhaps it's saving grace was producing a 10 core chip but at a whopping $1700 which can now be beaten by the 8 core i9-9900k at less than a third of the price (providing price gouging not present).

AWOL

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