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WickedThunder86

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  • Content Count

    551
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  1. Like
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from Mel0nMan in Easily Bypass Windows 8.1,10,11 forced signup   
    Hello,
    I regularly come through many windows systems and one of the most frustrating things is the forced Microsoft account signup.
    Here's a super simple way to bypass it:-
    Just type the email "garbage@garbage.com" and it will automatically go ahead and continue the setup as if nothing happened
    Sometimes it may ask for a password (just type anything that comes into your mind and it will work)
     

  2. Like
    WickedThunder86 reacted to AbydosOne in How long has it been since you used/had physical cash?   
    (emphasis mine)
     

     
    (https://xkcd.com/2335/)
  3. Like
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from TheCoder2019 in LTT forum "banning" game   
    Banned because it's a problem with your screen resolution (It looks perfectly fine on my 1080p display)
  4. Agree
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from TheCoder2019 in LTT forum "banning" game   
    Banned because my school starts at 6:30 am.
     
    Also, Banned because can't you simply just turn off notifications
  5. Informative
    WickedThunder86 reacted to leadeater in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    A TPM/fTPM ban doesn't actually ban the RSA key, which is protected anyway so you could never ban it because it's not readable. The key being talked about is for internal TPM usage only, not the user derived keys for drive encryption (BitLocker) etc.
     
     
    https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/usenixsecurity16/sec16_paper_raj.pdf
     
    @WickedThunder86A TPM rest only resets user generated keys etc, it won't actually wipe the SSK and the HF, DK and UUID are hardware unique and nonvolatile. Disk encryption wouldn't be implemented in such a way that if the device lost power to everything that it would unreadable forever again.
     
    I also believe even if you were to generate the key again it would result in the same key because of the way the SSK is generated.
     
    One of the primary issues with TPM 1.2 was that there was no reference specification which lead to many problems. This is why TPM 2.0 has a reference specification and implementation so while yes each vendor application of it will be code unique as to work with their fTPM implementation (Intel PTT, AMD PSP ARM TrustZone) they all have to function the same. None of them can implement anything outside of the TPM 2.0 spec and all function must conform to the TPM 2.0 spec.
     
    Neither could a TPM send anything anywhere, that would actually be impossible. Namely because it literally can't do that and additionally the TPM doesn't store anything that would be of any use to anyone without the SSK which cannot be read. I guess you could try and argue any of the vendors could go outside the fTPM reference and do something funky but no security research has found anything like that at all.
     
    Same is effectively true for fTPM as well anyway. We are talking about banning TPM hardware IDs not actually the RSA key (SSK) and those can't be changed.
  6. Like
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from LAwLz in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    I was talking about fTPM (Sorry for my lack of context)
  7. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Levent in RX 470 turns on but no display! :( Locked to Ryzen only?   
    TLDR: FYI, That is not possible.
  8. Informative
    WickedThunder86 reacted to leadeater in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    I know but they currently do not enforce it anywhere. An OEM license will happily activate on new hardware with sufficient time between activations and if not you can call MS support and do phone activation.
     
    It's just a lot of scary words that they don't actually do.
  9. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to James Evens in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    Glade to know.
    Still a shit move from Microsoft as home user don't profit at all from enforcing TPM for VMs. What's next HyperV requirement?
  10. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to jagdtigger in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    AFAIK on home edition you cant....
  11. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to CalintzJerevinan in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    At this rate who wants to even use Windows?  The UI is a joke, the system requirements are completely insane, and most of all why is Microsoft being so stupid during a chip shortage?  Microsoft needs to get their heads out of the sand and look at the chip shortage.
  12. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to LloydLynx in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    And this is just one reason why I avoid Windows like the plague.
  13. Informative
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Craftyawesome in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    6th and 7th gen also have built in TPM 2.0.
  14. Agree
  15. Informative
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Kisai in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    https://www.microsoft.com/security/blog/2021/09/15/the-passwordless-future-is-here-for-your-microsoft-account/
    That's why.
     
  16. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Zodiark1593 in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    DRM maybe? Keep encryption keys from reaching the CPU and memory, you can probably enforce greater control over content even on a PC. Microsoft could be trying to appeal to content owners, and focusing on a more media-heavy use. 
  17. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to bcredeur97 in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    how long before MS goes full walled garden like apple? 
  18. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to bmx6454 in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    i'm curious why they are pushing tpm so hard. i get that it is more secure, but afaik most people don't want it, so why push it so hard?
  19. Informative
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Craftyawesome in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    Summary
    Previously, installing or updating Windows 11 in a VM would ignore some requirements like TPM 2.0. However, this is no longer happening with beta build 22000.194 and dev build 22458. Attempting to update will throw an error.
     

     
    Quotes
     
     
    My thoughts
    It's a shame that MS did this, since a VM is a convenient way to try Windows 11 preview builds. The TPM requirement seems particularly annoying on a Windows host. Hyper-V works, but needs Windows Pro. I couldn't find an indication that Virtualbox supports TPM 2.0 (the above mention of Oracle seems to be about Oracle VM Server or something). VMWare does support vTPM, but it wants an encrypted VM, which the free version cannot create. Outside of Windows, Parallels and QEMU support TPM 2.0.
     
    Sources
    https://www.xda-developers.com/windows-11-vms-will-likely-soon-require-tpm-2-0/
    https://blogs.windows.com/windows-insider/2021/09/15/announcing-windows-11-insider-preview-build-22458/
    https://blogs.windows.com/windows-insider/2021/09/16/announcing-windows-11-insider-preview-build-22000-194/
    https://techbuzz.asia/2021/09/16/the-latest-build-of-windows-11-is-offering-an-error-message-on-some-computers-that-do-not-have-a-tpm-2-0-chip/
  20. Agree
    WickedThunder86 reacted to Mel0nMan in Windows 11 Now Enforces the Same System Requirements in Virtual Machines - Including TPM   
    Just...
    stop. 
     
     
    Just stop, Microsoft.
    Literally stop. 
     
  21. Agree
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from RockSolid1106 in repeated cloudflare a   
    If you get the issue only one time, Then I don't think there's any need to report it. Nothing is 100 percent safe from errors.
  22. Funny
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from RockSolid1106 in LTT forum "banning" game   
    Banned because my school board once students enter high school require them to submit their notes every month, Otherwise they will be subjected to disciplinary action.
     
    Also, It's my laptop ( LibreBootedThinkPad X200). I know it's very old but atleast my school has no control over it because it's mine and it's probably faster than those $200 Chromebooks they give
  23. Funny
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from RockSolid1106 in LTT forum "banning" game   
    Banned because that's not the case with me. I have mostly get in trouble because I usually never complete my notes (It doesn't affect my exam result tho.) And some teachers think I am a hacker because I use Arch Linux on my laptop instead of Windows or Chrome OS
  24. Funny
    WickedThunder86 got a reaction from RockSolid1106 in LTT forum "banning" game   
    Banned because I always get in trouble at school.
  25. Like
    WickedThunder86 reacted to BrightCandle in What is it that causes FurMark to be a power virus?   
    Furmark was originally written and designed to maximise the use of the ALU's inside of the GPU cores. Its specifically written to maximise the workload done with as few stalls as possible. As such its one of the few programs that actually really fills the GPUs pipeline of work up and keeps the ALUs running full time for almost every cycle. As a result its usage of the GPU is much higher than the average program that can not utilise the ALUs fully as they take branches (slow) or do calculations not designed around maximising the hardware usage.
     
    The companies called it a power hog but they initially complained about it because it had the ability to actually break their hardware. Neither Nvidia nor AMD had designed their cards to throttle and protect themselves against an efficient GPU program like furmark's and as a result the hardware could be damaged. They both put in a software solution. Nowadays they continue to claim its just a power virus, but the reality is its one of the most efficient uses of a GPU you will find and this just means that if you push to the theoretical throughput of the GPU it will actually throttle because its not capable of sustaining that level of performance.
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