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dundundundun

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  1. Like
    dundundundun reacted to Results45 in Potentially Intel Inside everything: Pat Gelsinger anounces renewal of foundry services   
    Doesn't look like anybody else has a thread on this yet so here goes.........
     
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/16575/intels-x86-designs-no-longer-limited-to-intel-on-intel-ip-blocks-for-foundry-cores-on-tsmc
     
    EDIT ~ even more details from TechTechPotato:
     
    It looks like Intel is aiming to offer TSMC/Samsung/GloFlo-style foundry capacity to clients wanting orders of custom x86 and RISC processors by 2023 and maybe even FPGA, MIPS, Power, analog, and other kinds of architectures later on.
     
    So........my iPhone, laptop, eGPU, PS5, PC, Tesla, Roomba, and AR glasses might all soon have Intel Inside®?
  2. Agree
    dundundundun reacted to D13H4RD in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    A lot of it is just the AMD circlejerk train. I can definitely understand why some people might not feel highly towards Intel due to its history of anti-competitive behavior, but it's gotten to the point where it's flat out ridiculous. 
  3. Agree
    dundundundun got a reaction from dizmo in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    what's with the title
    this is clearly not a product launch, more like a conference; did anyone expect intel to release 7 nm chips in this event?
  4. Agree
    dundundundun reacted to porina in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    I really don't get the hatred. The performance gap between Rocket Lake and Zen 3 is smaller than Zen+ to Skylake, yet people still bought Zen+ by the bucket load. 
     
    2023 is the Meteor Lake date. Alder Lake desktop will probably be at worst an early 2022 volume availability, with a "launch" end 2021 to keep up with what they said before. Both AMD and Intel do seem to have desktop as lowest priority in their offerings.
     
    I've gone the other way. I've got rid of all my Ryzen systems. More problems than they're worth. Zen/Zen+ were just too slow for anything doing more work than Cinebench R15. Zen 2 is ok but the split CCX was a pain that had to be worked around, and Zen 3 finally overcomes that but at what cost? Where are the lower models? Will wait and see what Zen 4 brings if they can persuade me to try them again. You want to talk about shortages, AMD is suffering more than Intel are.
     
    They're already shipping chiplets, in Lakefied. Ok, it isn't mainstream desktop which is the main interest around here. They have the technology and it is rolling out in future designs.
  5. Agree
    dundundundun got a reaction from LAwLz in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    what's with the title
    this is clearly not a product launch, more like a conference; did anyone expect intel to release 7 nm chips in this event?
  6. Agree
    dundundundun reacted to CommanderAlex in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    10nm is still in Intel's pipeline, they aren't skipping over it entirely. Their 7nm process still has a long way to go before we start seeing mass produced chips just yet, I'll leave this down below from the article. 
    Still a long time from now, Intel will be releasing Alder Lake on 10nm SuperFIN supposedly 2H 2021 and they'll probably have a successor sometime next year, with 7nm beginning in 2023. 
     
    You do realize the manufacturing node size is different across the semiconductor industry right??? Every semiconductor fabrication plant measures their transistors (gates I believe, if I'm not mistaken) differently. 
  7. Agree
    dundundundun reacted to D13H4RD in Intel tries to distract by "finishing the design" of a 7nm chip in Q2 2021   
    This is really more of an announcement regarding the manufacturing and roadmap side of things. It's not nearly as exciting as a product launch but it's no less important because it shows where the company is headed. 
     
    Both the announcement of new fabs in Arizona alongside the opening of Intel's manufacturing to customers are what I see as potentially good things considering the issues with foundries like TSMC in dealing with massive demand. I think tech as a whole is waking up to the reality that maybe, just maybe, we've been too reliant on TSMC for manufacturing. 
     
    And I know someone's gonna say "7nm in 2023? LMAO, AMD'S BEEN ON 7NM SINCE 2019 KEKEKE", so I'm just going to say what everyone else has said; You can't compare different manufacturing nodes simply by the nanometer figure. Just like how Samsung 8nm is significantly different from TSMC 7nm despite what the nm figure suggests, Intel's 7nm is going to be very different from TSMC 7nm, being closer in density to TSMC's 5nm node. 
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