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Gachr

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  1. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from RAGNES7 in Windows 10 Insider Topic   
    Okay guys, here are bugs/easter eggs that I found so far, I'll put them all in the first post.
     
    Two task managers
     
    Charm bar still exists (if you click on search in apps)
     
    Clipboard doesn't work (at least for me)
     
    Sent from Windows 10
  2. Like
    Gachr reacted to vorticalbox in Trying to install Node.js on old Ubuntu... Could someone tell me what the sources list for it is?   
    Please dont do this and use this
     
    https://github.com/creationix/nvm
  3. Like
    Gachr got a reaction from TopHatProductions115 in Windows 10 Insider Topic   
    Hi, this is the topic for all things W10 development. The previous, outdated first message is in the spoiler below, nothing else here for now.
     


  4. Informative
    Gachr reacted to shooter2749 in i7 8700 temps on Noctua L9i   
    the nh-l9i stays quiet even under load, try remounting it to see if your thermal paste application was correct and use the included low noise adapter. for temps post a picture of when under load and try undervolting the cpu, optimumTect on youtube recently did a video on that
  5. Informative
    Gachr reacted to dizmo in i7 8700 temps on Noctua L9i   
    Those aren't bad temps.
  6. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from Einar Karl in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  7. Like
    Gachr got a reaction from TomFFA in PC Upgrading help   
    The 120/140 rad coolers aren't worth it.
    Your build is really decent, but get different RAM - OC capabilities of LPX on Ryzen are pretty terrible, I had those myself.
    Also, it would be worth it to eventually buy a large SSD too, the speed difference is huge.
  8. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from Jaok in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  9. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from Meic in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  10. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from ignaloidas in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  11. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from Merkey in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  12. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from r2724r16 in What should you really learn?   
    Hi, there are very many topics like that, also a few explaining those things. I decided to make my own, share my few years of programming experience.
     
    The most important question is - what do you want to do?
    Game Development
    I'll tell you straight away - if you want to get a job in game development, it will be very difficult. There are very few jobs, which require versatile skillsets. You can still manage to get one of course, or learn game dev just as a hobby - it's still great! You can learn a lot about programming making games. Even if you want to solely be a programmer, 3D modelling and 2D graphics are quite important - it will be difficult to make even a small game without those by yourself. As for languages - there are just so many different languages. Please skip to the Generic Languages - learn something like that, and then start using an engine. Unity that uses C# and Godot that uses its own language, along C# are very popular choices. Honourable mention to Unreal, but I don't think it's a very good first engine). You might think that you should learn C# for game development, and it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. However, you don't really need that much C# knowledge to start developing games, and the core language can be quite overwhelming.
    Mobile Development
    Apps are everywhere, so mobile is a good way to go. Quite a lot of jobs - still not as many as for web developers, but it should be fairly easy to get a job as a mobile dev. And hey - you can always freelance easily or make money on your own apps! iOS development is usually done in Swift, Apple's own language. It's a language for the Apple ecosystem, so if you don't have a mac, it's not a good idea to go into iOS development. Not only because of the language itself, but also you actally need a mac to develop and test those apps. Windows Phone uses C#, but who cares For Android, the generic option is Java. Again, Java can be quite overwhelming, so keep that in mind. There are, however frameworks that allow you to create an app once, and make it run on multiple machines. A very popular choice is one called Xamarin, that uses C#. It uses native toolkits for creating apps, so your apps will look very good no matter the platform. This is the general outline for mobile development. You can also create apps with JavaScript, but this is a route that I wouldn't advise you to go unless you are a web developer already.
    Websites!
    If you want to learn web development, you need to learn those things that you've heard of so many times - HTML and CSS. Many people think that coding in HTML and CSS is programming, but it's not. It's just an additional asset that's required if you want to create websites. You won't learn the same concepts as with programming language. The thing specific to creating websites on the front end (more on that later) is that you can do those only in one language - JavaScript. JS is a language that's capable of many great things, but websites are its origin. Once you learnt those three things - the huge world of web development is open to you!
    Front-end vs Back-end
    You might've heard those terms before. A long time ago, websites weren't too capable - there were some more complex ones indeed, but the same techniques were used. The web got so huge that the separation arose... well, it was always there to some extend, but right now the gap is quite wide. What I talked about above, is front-end development, so it's creating interfaces. However, if you want to create fully fledged websites that connect to databases, you need the "back end". Back end is the server logic that does everything behind the scenes. Nowadays, backend isn't limited to websites only. Using back-end languages, you can create something called an API, that lots of different clients can connect to - your website indeed, but you can also connect through a mobile app! Well, say you got a job at BMW - you could even create APIs for cars! APIs are intefaces that anything connected to the internet can connect to. They are responsible for all kinds of processing of data and files. So - should you go for front end or back end? Well, try both! For a lot of backend jobs, you will have to learn HTML, CSS and possibly JS anyway - it's also very good to know how they work. Then you can pick your favourite. There are lots of jobs for both, I'm working as a front end React developer, but I can do both myself. There is really great breakdown of what you have to learn about web development (both front and back) over here, don't get overwhelmed tho, I will also explain those things down the line: https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap
    Front-end
    You already learnt the basics. The very important thing is that you should learn the pure JavaScript language, don't jump into any libraries, frameworks or any other trendy stuff. As a JS developer, I can confirm that the core JS language is pretty terible it's difficult, but if you learn it very well, you'll be a much better web developer than a lot of other candidates! Once you mastered JavaScript, you should learn a framework. It's not somethig that you should specialise in - yes, there are lots of React, Angular etc jobs, but they are just tools. It's very important that you are a good JS developer, and other things will be just additional assets. Things that will come in very handy are npm and sass, make sure to learn those! You have a much more in depth description of all those technologies in the link above.
    Back-end
    This is where the real fun begins. Historically, PHP is the behemoth for websites. Lots of people hate on PHP, some reasons are very valid, some aren't, but it's not a necessarily bad language. No matter what you think about PHP, it will be the best choice for creating back-ends for websites. For other things? Not that much, but it's decent nonetheless. Thing is, no matter what language is your favourite, PHP has the popularity, maturity and lots of developers! There are lots of jobs, and lots of different tutorials and documentation. If you go with PHP, you might struggle a little, but it's a very solid option.
    But, nowadays, you can use pretty much anything for backends.
    Java is huge for back-ends, especially in the enterprise. It is a huge ecosystem, so you will really need to dive into it. However, if you are good at Java, you can create lots of different wonderful things. Don't let anyone tell you that it's dying - it's not. C# is also quite large, not as large as Java, but it's also a very good option. Be aware though, that C# development isn't very popular in some parts of the world, and that you will be partly locked to Microsoft ecosystem.
    Python and Ruby are very decent choices for back end development too. There are lots of jobs, the languages are powerful... You can't really go wrong with those. They are easy to learn, but aren't to specific to web development as PHP, you can do lots more things with them.
    Then, there is Node.js, which allows you to write server code with JavaScript. Like I said before, JS is super versatile. Node.js has an ecosystem and way of running that's quite unusual, but it's a solid option for front-end web developers.
    You can create backends with pretty much any language, but the ones above are the most popular and easiest ones. There are lots of tutorials, programmers and jobs. If you want to create backends with something else - please go ahead! But for the beginner, the above options are the good ones. More info about back end development is available in the infographic I linked to above.
     
    Generic Options
    If you still aren't sure what you want to do, or just want to try programming - there are two options you can't really go wrong with.
    The first one is Python, which is recommended A LOT. Personally? I think it's overrated. It is easy to learn, and you can do lots of things with it - so if you want to learn by doing, it's the perfect match. However, it is not a remedy and perfect solution for everything. So yes, if you want to write scripts and do cool stuff - choose Python!
    The other one is C. I will tell you right away, that you won't do too many things with it, especially cool things. However, if you learn C well, you will know lots of concepts that are essential to programming and computer science. In my opinion, I think that every programmer should know C more or less. It just gives you lots of useful skills and insights.
    You might ask - why not C++? C++ is also a very useful language, but it's probably the most difficult one out all the ones that I've mentioned. Learning it can be, and most likely will be very overwhelming. However, C++ is just an extension of C. So even if your goal is to do things with C++, it's a good idea to learn C first, and then learn what's new in C++.
     
    Yes, so the post is much longer than I wanted it to be, there are still a lot of things to talk about, but I have to sleep I'll most likely extend this topic, please share your suggestions and ask me questions below! The last question is "where to learn it?". There are lots of different resources, but my tips are not to use pretty websites like codecademy, because you'll get lazy because of them. Once I made a long topic on why those websites aren't that good. Look for tutorials, but don't be afraid to look into official documentation, and most importantly - experiment! That's the greatest way to learn.
  13. Funny
    Gachr got a reaction from Wolf ~ IRONI in 750£ Dev Build   
    Mate, the budget is in the title and in the post - 750 quid. It's GBP, so the location is obvious.
    I don't need a GPU, like I said in the post, it's a (web) development machine.
  14. Like
    Gachr reacted to orbitalbuzzsaw in 750£ Dev Build   
    Looks fine though I'd get a better keyboard like this one
  15. Like
    Gachr reacted to AluminiumTech in xbox one controllers - old vs new   
    The new wireless Xbox One Controller dongle was delayed until 2018.
     
    The existing one is rather large.
     
    I'd just wait for the new Controller dongle to come out but there's no definitive date as to when it will come out.
  16. Agree
    Gachr got a reaction from mrchow19910319 in Mac vs Windows for programming?   
    Programming on Windows is terrible, period. Why?
    No built-in package manager, support for version managers (afaik), you just have chocolatey which isn't too comfortable to use PowerShell and cmd commands are different from macOS/Linux ones, the shells aren't easy nor comfortable to use. If you're not using a proper editor, unix line endings could get replaced with Windows line endings and screw up your code. Many niche languages and libraries simply don't support Windows. It's more difficult to get build tools, compilers etc., and their installation is way more time consuming than on macOS/Linux.  
    Unfortunately, I don't think you have much experience in development, people don't just do development in pure HTML - I don't know a company where it would've been done so. Everyone uses either a full-fledged front-end framework environment (Vue + webpack for example) or they are using back-end language/features, like Jade for JS or Blade for PHP (Laravel), and in pretty much all decent webapps you'll use some kind of toolchain. For both case scenarios, you need good editors that can support custom syntaxes and build tools to actually run your code.
     
     
  17. Like
    Gachr got a reaction from Claryn in Mac vs Windows for programming?   
    Programming on Windows is terrible, period. Why?
    No built-in package manager, support for version managers (afaik), you just have chocolatey which isn't too comfortable to use PowerShell and cmd commands are different from macOS/Linux ones, the shells aren't easy nor comfortable to use. If you're not using a proper editor, unix line endings could get replaced with Windows line endings and screw up your code. Many niche languages and libraries simply don't support Windows. It's more difficult to get build tools, compilers etc., and their installation is way more time consuming than on macOS/Linux.  
    Unfortunately, I don't think you have much experience in development, people don't just do development in pure HTML - I don't know a company where it would've been done so. Everyone uses either a full-fledged front-end framework environment (Vue + webpack for example) or they are using back-end language/features, like Jade for JS or Blade for PHP (Laravel), and in pretty much all decent webapps you'll use some kind of toolchain. For both case scenarios, you need good editors that can support custom syntaxes and build tools to actually run your code.
     
     
  18. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from Septimus in Windows 10 Insider Topic   
    Hi, this is the topic for all things W10 development. The previous, outdated first message is in the spoiler below, nothing else here for now.
     


  19. Agree
    Gachr got a reaction from CookieMaster in Help with picking a programming language.   
    You should be able to make the game fairly easily with Unity3D, that uses C#.
  20. Like
    Gachr got a reaction from Necro_Infernus in Help with picking a programming language.   
    You should be able to make the game fairly easily with Unity3D, that uses C#.
  21. Informative
    Gachr reacted to Unimportant in Beginner's help   
    One of the important diffirences:
    int a = 10; void *b = &a; int *c = b; printf("%d\n", *c); Valid C, because implicit pointer conversion is allowed.
    Invalid C++, explicit cast required.
  22. Informative
    Gachr reacted to Dat Guy in Beginner's help   
    int main() { int class = 5; return 0; } Valid in C (because C has no "class" keyword), invalid in C++.
    (Copypasta'd from Stack Overflow.)
  23. Agree
    Gachr reacted to noahdvs in Where to start?   
    That's inaccurate. Java, Python and Ruby are not for doing what C++ is best for. C++ shines where performance is important. That would be things like games, operating systems and embedded devices. Java, Python and Ruby are more often used for web development and scripting. It's more difficult to write secure software for the web in C and C++ (Cloudbleed and Heartbleed are 2 infamous examples). Java, Python and Ruby are also more portable than C++.
  24. Agree
    Gachr got a reaction from fpo in Where to start?   
    So, I'm going to split this post into 3 parts, and this is the first, I'll comment on languages mentioned above.
     
    Golang:
    It is a useful language which implements some features, that make it easier than C for example, but it's still pretty difficult. This is a comparison of code that I wrote in Golang first, and then code that I wrote in Ruby:
    package main import ( "fmt" "strings" "io/ioutil" ) func de (s []string) []string { var r []string for _, str := range s { if str != "" { r = append(r, str) } } return r } func main(){ data, _ := ioutil.ReadFile("/proc/meminfo") s := string(data) memory_total := de(strings.Split(strings.Split(s, "\n")[0], " "))[1] memory_free := de(strings.Split(strings.Split(s, "\n")[2], " "))[1] } memory = YAML.load(File.open("/proc/meminfo")) memory_total = memory["MemTotal"] memory_free = memory["MemAvailable"] Quite a difference, huh?
    But, I think the real issue with Golang is that it was create with a very specific goal in mind (some networking), which you are unlikely to be interested in... At least so interested, to learn a whole new language. Doing other stuff with it, like GUI interfaces or games seems to be impossible for a beginner I think.
     
    C:
    The language is a legend. However, I don't think that its popularity will do you much good - it will be easier for you to do new stuff with way less popular languages, that have a package manager and easy to use libraries.
    Just like with Golang, you'll write way more code than you actually need to.
    With C, you will learn lots of things about computers, but the question is, do you really want to know them? There is a difference between a guy who just wants to make websites and money on it, and a guy who wants to know how the operating system works, at least out of curiosity. If you are the latter, you can still learn C later.
     
    C++:
    It's actually C, but with extra stuff. I think that to appreciate the ++ features, you first need to understand the base language well. Otherwise, they will just confuse you, and make you avoid some basic concepts.
     
    C#:
    This is one of my top recommendations. This is a language, that's used a lot in the enterprise, but it still provides lots of great usage scenarios for hobbyists. It's actually easier than C, Go, and other languages like that, despite not being as easy as Ruby for example. It might be intimidating at first, but if you go through the basics, it should become fairly easy to use.
    There are just so many usage scenarios with this one - it's used to build apps through Xamarin, games with Unity or MonoGame, and it's also considered easy to build desktop GUI apps with it.
    Its only disadvantage, in my eyes, is the lack of libraries and general support of (mostly) GUI stuff on Linux and macOS desktops.
     
    Java:
    It's actually a language that I didn't use much. It's similar to C# in its syntax, it's more multi platform, it's more widely used in enterprise (at least in my country), but it doesn't have so many great features for consumer stuff.
     
    Rust:
    It's a great language that's fairly similar to C and Go. However, I don't recommend it for a beginner, since it's still a difficult language, plus its documentation isn't very good in my opinion.
     
    Ruby:
    It's my favourite language. It's really easy to pick up, and it teaches you lots of different stuff that you will use in other languages. Its syntax is very consistent, and the language has pretty much everything you'll need when wanting to build basic programs. Together with Sinatra, Rails and Padrino frameworks, it's a great choice for web development. It has an easy to use package manager built in (like few others above) that gets you modules to build your next application.
    However, I won't recommend it, why? Although very large, its community isn't very active, and trends are going in another direction. I'm personally going from Ruby to Elixir, as my to-go language for fun stuff.
     
    Python:
    I just don't like the language. Its community is huge, so you'll find lots of useful libraries and such, but the downside of that is, that there are lots of newbies, so you'll find quite a lot of false information. Other reasons are the ones here:
     
    Part 2 - An Answer:
    I think it's pretty bad, and I've explained it in a separate topic.
    Especially that OP already used it and knows the basics. The only advantage of codecademy is that it repeats stuff, so you learn it well, but you can do it yourself through experimentation.
     
    Part 3 - The Choice:
    JavaScript
    I think that's the language you should keep on learning. You already know the basics of it, and you can do all the stuff you might want to do, so why not?
    You can create user interfaces with HTML, CSS and JS itself - there are lots of frameworks for user interfaces, including React, Vue and Angular.
    You can create back-end web server logic with it, using Node with frameworks like Express or Sails.
    You can create games, using many game frameworks for JS, or use UnityScript (a modified version of JS) with Unity3D.
    There is just so much stuff you can do with JS, there is a reason it's the most popular language.
  25. Informative
    Gachr got a reaction from BuckGup in Swift Not on Mac?   
    Swift is an open source language, it means you can run it on most of the popular platforms. You don't need a mac for the basic functionality. You will, however, need one if you want to use Apple-specific tools and export it on the device itself. For Swift basics, it's fine.
    Objective-C is another language used for iOS development, but it's known to be more difficult and troublesome than Swift.
    There is a framework called Xamarin, using which you can create apps for iOS as well as Android and WP, using the C# language.
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