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Mega2

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  1. Thanks. For the second method, would you be able to elaborate more on what you meant? How would I go about installing ProxMox on another OS?
  2. No luck with the first link. Just the same results. Do you think it would be better for me to just install Debian Buster and install ProxMox in that?
  3. Cool, thanks. Someone on Reddit proposed that I use Debian Buster and install ProxMox in that, as that's how they resolved a similar issue. Assuming VT-d is enabled, would i still be able to do a gpu pass through for Blender and SolidWorks?
  4. I'm trying an older version. Does this set up for Rufus look good?
  5. No, there's no light on this one. Do you think Rufus would make a significant difference for this situation? Sounds to me like a screen thing, since the server sounds like it's running fine. Is there anything else I can try in the mean time?
  6. How can I check for disk IO on the usb drive? Would it be in bios? Also, I don't have any sort of impi to monitor set up
  7. I'll try to be as specific as possible here. My server had CentOS 7 installed to it previously and is now the default OS (it was initially installed via bootable USB). However, I now want to replace it with ProxMox to make other VMs. The server is an IBM/Lenovo x3850 x5 with a IBM 88Y5351 motherboard and four Intel Xeon E7 4830 processors (32 physical cores across all of them). In BIOS, hyperthreading, Intel Virtualization (VT-x), and VT-d are all enabled. To boot ProxMox, I used the most recent ProxMox ISO (ProxMox VE 6.3 iso release 1) etched to a 16 GB US
  8. Thanks, do you think an SEUS PTGI shader would work despite my relatively low-end CPU?
  9. I've got an IBM/Lenovo x3850 x5 server with four Intel Xeon E7-4830 cores installed and an Nvidia GTX 1650S graphics card. While the graphics card is not a concern of mine, the 2.2 GHz clock rate and motherboard that's the same age as the game itself raises an eyebrow. Hyperthreading will obviously be turned off. Will single-player Vanilla Minecraft run above 60 FPS and, if so, would I be able to run it with RTX on? I'm not hoping for much more than 20 FPS if RTX is switched on. Edit: It's got 64 GB of DDR3 RAM
  10. Each server has a particular power output. The x3850 x5, for example, has 25 W.
  11. This guy right here: https://www.amazon.com/KAIWEETS-Adjustable-Switching-Regulated-Interface/dp/B085S34NNW/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=variable+dc+power+supplies&qid=1612716235&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExVldENkFYQUQ2S0ZLJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNDU0NjEyMkEwNTBCOVROSTNDWSZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNDk4NTQwMjFDOUZIS0tPUE9NNiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=
  12. A 6-pin and another 8-pin connector, although it's possible just to use either the 6-pin or the 8-pin.
  13. Ive got a graphics card with a 6 and 8-pin female port for power. As it requires 100 W max, my auxiliary connector port on my server will not be sufficient. Rather, I've decided to go with my 100 W DC power supply that has a standard 3-prong outlet with an adjustable voltage (although it's 3 prong ill be using it in DC mode). Since this isn't really a standard connection with off-the-shelf components, I was curious if any one had any recommendations for types of adapters and products I should keep an eye out for when trying to rig this together. Ideally, I'd like to kee
  14. I know it works for an Nvidia GRID k1 graphics card with 4 GPUs. Given that, is it correct to assume that it should also work with a GTX card? On a second note, I did find out that my PCIe slot can only supply 25 W. Would I then be able to hook the auxiliary power cord on the graphics card to an external power supply? I've got a fixed-voltage power supply that I can use to supply up to 100 W DC.
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