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Chris Pratt

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  1. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Treble Sketch in [OFFICIAL] ZEN 4 will be on a new platform with ddr5 and pcie 5.0.   
    No. The socket would be completely incompatible. Last I heard it's a land grid array, so it would be like trying to stuff a Zen 3 chip into an Intel mobo. I'm not sure where you got the idea that AM5 would support 5000 series, but that was never going to be a thing.
  2. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from kirashi in Let's talk honestly about being honest...   
    Kind of curious what prompted this. Without context, it does seem like you're being a bit hyperbolic here. Any public forum is going to have issues like your describe. That's the nature of being a public forum, especially given the Internet. Spend a little time on Twitter and the worst that gets posted here will seem downright quaint.
     
    I can't speak to your experience, but in mine, the mods have never came down or chastised me for asking for more info, or just flat out saying something is silly or unconstructive. I've actually gotten into pretty heat squabbles with some who people here who just act like idiots and need to be called out as such. It's all about tone and attempting to remain constructive, though. If you just post that some one is a moron, yeah, that's probably going to provoke a mod, but if you engage and explain in an even-headed way why what they're saying is wrong or dumb, then that should be fine.
     
    My two cents, though. Like I said, I don't know the context here.
     
  3. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from xg32 in ddr5 prices are ewwwie!🐢🤢🤮   
    As far as top of the line CPUs go, I don't think the 12900K is going to be it. It's an 8P-8E with 24 threads, which puts it squarely between the 5900X and 5950X in cores/threads. I'm not sure how much extra performance Intel will manage to squeeze out of a new node, but even if it's in the 15% range, AMD will easily make that up with Zen 3D, let alone Zen 4, when that comes out next year.
     
    Intel is making up ground here, but AMD still has a significant lead.
  4. Informative
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Dedayog in Let's talk honestly about being honest...   
    Kind of curious what prompted this. Without context, it does seem like you're being a bit hyperbolic here. Any public forum is going to have issues like your describe. That's the nature of being a public forum, especially given the Internet. Spend a little time on Twitter and the worst that gets posted here will seem downright quaint.
     
    I can't speak to your experience, but in mine, the mods have never came down or chastised me for asking for more info, or just flat out saying something is silly or unconstructive. I've actually gotten into pretty heat squabbles with some who people here who just act like idiots and need to be called out as such. It's all about tone and attempting to remain constructive, though. If you just post that some one is a moron, yeah, that's probably going to provoke a mod, but if you engage and explain in an even-headed way why what they're saying is wrong or dumb, then that should be fine.
     
    My two cents, though. Like I said, I don't know the context here.
     
  5. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from HanZie82 in ddr5 prices are ewwwie!🐢🤢🤮   
    As far as top of the line CPUs go, I don't think the 12900K is going to be it. It's an 8P-8E with 24 threads, which puts it squarely between the 5900X and 5950X in cores/threads. I'm not sure how much extra performance Intel will manage to squeeze out of a new node, but even if it's in the 15% range, AMD will easily make that up with Zen 3D, let alone Zen 4, when that comes out next year.
     
    Intel is making up ground here, but AMD still has a significant lead.
  6. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from varrys in A mathematical question on calculating "bang for the buck"   
    There's a number of things wrong here. For one, component performance is not linear, i.e. if spending X gives you Y performance, spending 2X doesn't mean you get 2Y performance. While there's exceptions to every rule, it's generally asymtopic. As you go from zero cost up, performance dramatically outpaces the extra investment until you start hitting the high end where cost then dramatically outpaces any increase in performance. The best value or "bang for the buck", therefore, generally lies in the midrange.
     
    Second, components do not work in isolation. The reason it's called a system is because they all interact with each other. A good CPU can be hamstrung by bad RAM, for example. The value of the system lies in the combination of parts, so you can't just look at two systems with the same CPU, for example, and say one is a better value than another because it costs less. It might cost less for a reason, and the difference in cost may actually add a significant performance boost to the second system, that outpaces that difference.
     
    Finally, value is somewhat subjective and depends on the workloads. For example, I purchased a 5900X, because for me, it was an excellent value. I do a lot of multicore heavy workloads, and dollar for dollar, there's nothing right now that matches the 5900X for those workloads. If you were just building a system to play CS:GO, the 5900X would be a horrible value, though.
  7. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from F10_9sday2u in With Ryzen 5900x should I go with 4 by 8GB or 2 by 16GB of ram? Thank you all for helping me out.   
    The optimum number of DIMMs is always the number channels, so two sticks is always better from a stability perspective. You'll get better performance with four total ranks, though. However, that can be achieved with either 2x dual rank or 4x single rank.
     
    While true that going with two gives you the ability to add two more later to upgrade, in practice that's generally not the best approach anyways. You're far better off just flipping your existing kit on the used market and buying a new kit of two at a higher capacity. You can easily run into compatibility issues even if you buy the "same" kit later, as manufacturers often change dies over time, and that's assuming you can actually still find the same kit later when you want to upgrade. Long and short, it shouldn't be a factor in your decision one way or another.
     
    The 5900X is very memory sensitive, both due to the multi-CCD design and the workloads it will be tasked to do. If you're just gaming or something, you don't need that CPU anyways. You should get 3600MHz CL16, and then try to push it to 3800MHz or higher, if you can. Anything less, though, and you're leaving performance on the table.
  8. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from WolframaticAlpha in A mathematical question on calculating "bang for the buck"   
    There's a number of things wrong here. For one, component performance is not linear, i.e. if spending X gives you Y performance, spending 2X doesn't mean you get 2Y performance. While there's exceptions to every rule, it's generally asymtopic. As you go from zero cost up, performance dramatically outpaces the extra investment until you start hitting the high end where cost then dramatically outpaces any increase in performance. The best value or "bang for the buck", therefore, generally lies in the midrange.
     
    Second, components do not work in isolation. The reason it's called a system is because they all interact with each other. A good CPU can be hamstrung by bad RAM, for example. The value of the system lies in the combination of parts, so you can't just look at two systems with the same CPU, for example, and say one is a better value than another because it costs less. It might cost less for a reason, and the difference in cost may actually add a significant performance boost to the second system, that outpaces that difference.
     
    Finally, value is somewhat subjective and depends on the workloads. For example, I purchased a 5900X, because for me, it was an excellent value. I do a lot of multicore heavy workloads, and dollar for dollar, there's nothing right now that matches the 5900X for those workloads. If you were just building a system to play CS:GO, the 5900X would be a horrible value, though.
  9. Informative
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Radium_Angel in A mathematical question on calculating "bang for the buck"   
    There's a number of things wrong here. For one, component performance is not linear, i.e. if spending X gives you Y performance, spending 2X doesn't mean you get 2Y performance. While there's exceptions to every rule, it's generally asymtopic. As you go from zero cost up, performance dramatically outpaces the extra investment until you start hitting the high end where cost then dramatically outpaces any increase in performance. The best value or "bang for the buck", therefore, generally lies in the midrange.
     
    Second, components do not work in isolation. The reason it's called a system is because they all interact with each other. A good CPU can be hamstrung by bad RAM, for example. The value of the system lies in the combination of parts, so you can't just look at two systems with the same CPU, for example, and say one is a better value than another because it costs less. It might cost less for a reason, and the difference in cost may actually add a significant performance boost to the second system, that outpaces that difference.
     
    Finally, value is somewhat subjective and depends on the workloads. For example, I purchased a 5900X, because for me, it was an excellent value. I do a lot of multicore heavy workloads, and dollar for dollar, there's nothing right now that matches the 5900X for those workloads. If you were just building a system to play CS:GO, the 5900X would be a horrible value, though.
  10. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from sounds in [OFFICIAL] ZEN 4 will be on a new platform with ddr5 and pcie 5.0.   
    No. The socket would be completely incompatible. Last I heard it's a land grid array, so it would be like trying to stuff a Zen 3 chip into an Intel mobo. I'm not sure where you got the idea that AM5 would support 5000 series, but that was never going to be a thing.
  11. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from sazrocks in [OFFICIAL] ZEN 4 will be on a new platform with ddr5 and pcie 5.0.   
    No. The socket would be completely incompatible. Last I heard it's a land grid array, so it would be like trying to stuff a Zen 3 chip into an Intel mobo. I'm not sure where you got the idea that AM5 would support 5000 series, but that was never going to be a thing.
  12. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from FakeKGB in [OFFICIAL] ZEN 4 will be on a new platform with ddr5 and pcie 5.0.   
    No. The socket would be completely incompatible. Last I heard it's a land grid array, so it would be like trying to stuff a Zen 3 chip into an Intel mobo. I'm not sure where you got the idea that AM5 would support 5000 series, but that was never going to be a thing.
  13. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from YoungBlade in Lian Li Galahad AIO360 vs EK AIO Basic 360mm for 5900x   
    The Capellix is a very decent AIO in its own right. I wouldn't expect to see much if any improvement by switching it out with either of these two.
     
    The temperature difference between you and your friend is minimal and within margin of error for just being in a different environment. For example, maybe the room he has it in is slightly cooler than yours, etc. I wouldn't worry about it. The temps you're getting are totally fine as-is.
  14. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Filingo in Corsair RMx 2018 vs 2021   
    It was a slight modification for European energy efficiency requirements. The 2018 apparently wasn't quite in spec.
  15. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from MultiGamerClub in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    You're cracked. The products couldn't be more dissimilar. You need to look no further than the fact that Linus literally ripped the bottom off the Surface Laptop Studio trying to open it. The Surface Laptop Studio is literally designed as a single unit and it is what it is. The Framework is a entirely modular laptop that could be configured any number of ways. That's both its strength and its weakness. While it's near infinitely upgradeable and modifiable, it's not good at any one thing. Even if a touchscreen becomes available, it won't be one that can morph from laptop to easel to tablet, for example.
  16. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Dogzilla07 in Lian Li Galahad AIO360 vs EK AIO Basic 360mm for 5900x   
    The Capellix is a very decent AIO in its own right. I wouldn't expect to see much if any improvement by switching it out with either of these two.
     
    The temperature difference between you and your friend is minimal and within margin of error for just being in a different environment. For example, maybe the room he has it in is slightly cooler than yours, etc. I wouldn't worry about it. The temps you're getting are totally fine as-is.
  17. Like
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from KKLawrence in 5600g vs 5600x   
    5600G is roughly equivalent in CPU performance to a 3600. If you really need the iGPU, I'd go for a 5700G, which has the same performance as the 5600X. Otherwise, and especially if you have a dGPU already or will eventually get one, I'd stick with the 5600X.
  18. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Arika S in Idea: Scrapyard Wars: Pandemic Edition!   
    Yeah. Sorry, but big yawn-fest here. Everyone would just end up with a 1030 or something, and be like, well, yeah, you can game on it, but it's all low quality and low FPS. Barely enough content for one episode.
  19. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from FakeKGB in Idea: Scrapyard Wars: Pandemic Edition!   
    Yeah. Sorry, but big yawn-fest here. Everyone would just end up with a 1030 or something, and be like, well, yeah, you can game on it, but it's all low quality and low FPS. Barely enough content for one episode.
  20. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Arika S in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    "Thin and light" is a broad category now. You've got stuff like a Zephyrus 14, potentially rocking a 3080, that's not remotely in the same class, despite also being "thin and light" with "minimalist, silver aesthetics". The Apple M1 is yet another thing entirely, but again falls in your same broad categorization. The devices aren't the same, and they have entirely different target audiences.
  21. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from GDRRiley in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    You're cracked. The products couldn't be more dissimilar. You need to look no further than the fact that Linus literally ripped the bottom off the Surface Laptop Studio trying to open it. The Surface Laptop Studio is literally designed as a single unit and it is what it is. The Framework is a entirely modular laptop that could be configured any number of ways. That's both its strength and its weakness. While it's near infinitely upgradeable and modifiable, it's not good at any one thing. Even if a touchscreen becomes available, it won't be one that can morph from laptop to easel to tablet, for example.
  22. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Middcore in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    You're cracked. The products couldn't be more dissimilar. You need to look no further than the fact that Linus literally ripped the bottom off the Surface Laptop Studio trying to open it. The Surface Laptop Studio is literally designed as a single unit and it is what it is. The Framework is a entirely modular laptop that could be configured any number of ways. That's both its strength and its weakness. While it's near infinitely upgradeable and modifiable, it's not good at any one thing. Even if a touchscreen becomes available, it won't be one that can morph from laptop to easel to tablet, for example.
  23. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Mel0nMan in What would happen if a loop was filled with liquid metal?   
    Even if you could get it to function properly, it would be vastly inferior to plain old water. Nothing beats water as a liquid coolant.
     
  24. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from The L2d in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    You're cracked. The products couldn't be more dissimilar. You need to look no further than the fact that Linus literally ripped the bottom off the Surface Laptop Studio trying to open it. The Surface Laptop Studio is literally designed as a single unit and it is what it is. The Framework is a entirely modular laptop that could be configured any number of ways. That's both its strength and its weakness. While it's near infinitely upgradeable and modifiable, it's not good at any one thing. Even if a touchscreen becomes available, it won't be one that can morph from laptop to easel to tablet, for example.
  25. Agree
    Chris Pratt got a reaction from Freakwise in Linus reviews Surface Laptop Studio despite his investment in Framework   
    You're cracked. The products couldn't be more dissimilar. You need to look no further than the fact that Linus literally ripped the bottom off the Surface Laptop Studio trying to open it. The Surface Laptop Studio is literally designed as a single unit and it is what it is. The Framework is a entirely modular laptop that could be configured any number of ways. That's both its strength and its weakness. While it's near infinitely upgradeable and modifiable, it's not good at any one thing. Even if a touchscreen becomes available, it won't be one that can morph from laptop to easel to tablet, for example.
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