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boricj

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  1. Like
    boricj got a reaction from TheLastMillennial in Thread for Linus Tech Tips Video Suggestions   
    Now that Linus has a TI-84 Plus CE (shown in the graphing calculator overclocking video), maybe we can have a proper review and benchmarks of it?
     
    Post with details about suggestion:
     
  2. Agree
    boricj got a reaction from TheLastMillennial in Water Cooling a TI-84   
    Before overjoying about Texas Instruments calculators: they've removed ASM/C support from the TI-83 Premium CE through a software upgrade. No more DOOM for you.
     
     
  3. Like
    boricj got a reaction from TheLastMillennial in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    Cool! Now all we need is the video for benchmarking Python on calculators (with a reference to the ban on ASM/C) to tear TI a new one. All details you need to start working on this are in this post:
     
    Please Linus Tech Tips! The calculator community desperately needs some leverage to make Texas Instruments fold on that one. You can probably milk the calculators you'll buy by doing additional videos on it if you need to make your money back (like doing reviews of modern graphing calculators that are not grounded in the 90s for example). 
  4. Agree
    boricj got a reaction from Xaiux in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    You know what's even better than a segment on TechLinked? Benchmarks.
     
    A set of products, each with different characteristics, but all capable of running a common set of workload with measurable performance data points.... With Python no less. It's actually perfect for a Linus Tech Tips video:
    Relatable: anyone aged between 15 and 40 has most likely used one for a couple of years. Jokes potential: come on, it's graphing calculators, that stuff basically writes itself. Unexpected turn of events: who would expect graphing calculators to have color screens and run Python nowadays? Plot twists: if you thought AMD is wrecking Intel big time, wait until you see a NumWorks utterly destroy a TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python. A moral lesson at the end: a household name is not a guarantee of bang for your buck. Now where did I see that before... And most important: cheap. It's a couple of graphing calculators. Plus it would be a nice follow-up to that graphing calculator water-cooling experiment.
     
    Hey Linus! The YouTube bingo card is filled up! The power of the algorithm compels you!
     
    The set of calculators to benchmark (do double-check my list, there are similar models without Python support):
    NumWorks (model N110 preferably) Casio 35+E II (which should be a fx-9860GIII in North America) Casio 90+E (which should be a fx-CG50 in North America) TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python (not entirely sure if there's an international counterpart with Python support) If you can cozy up with manufacturers, official Python support is known to be in the works for the HP Prime (model G2 preferably) and the TI Nspire CX II (CAS or not).
     
    Suggested benchmarks:
    Integer (I suggest prime number determination and Bitcoin hash-rate) Floating-point (Riemann integral maybe?) Memory (TI-Planet has a script to allocate all the memory and print the capacity, do reset calculators beforehand) Fill rate (NumWorks has a nice Mandelbrot fractal sample, porting a bare-bones ray-tracer should be easy and TI-Planet has a cross-platform tech demo rendering of a radar) Turtle drawing speed at speed(0) And if you could put a small jab at TI for removing C and assembly features on the TI-83 Premium CE through software updates, thereby jeopardizing a rich history of video games and utilities, screwing over customers and every single developer who sank countless hours writing them, it'd be perfect.
  5. Agree
    boricj reacted to Zodiark1593 in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    I would like to see this. Bonus points for Doom benchmarks. 
  6. Agree
    boricj got a reaction from Jeffitus in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    You know what's even better than a segment on TechLinked? Benchmarks.
     
    A set of products, each with different characteristics, but all capable of running a common set of workload with measurable performance data points.... With Python no less. It's actually perfect for a Linus Tech Tips video:
    Relatable: anyone aged between 15 and 40 has most likely used one for a couple of years. Jokes potential: come on, it's graphing calculators, that stuff basically writes itself. Unexpected turn of events: who would expect graphing calculators to have color screens and run Python nowadays? Plot twists: if you thought AMD is wrecking Intel big time, wait until you see a NumWorks utterly destroy a TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python. A moral lesson at the end: a household name is not a guarantee of bang for your buck. Now where did I see that before... And most important: cheap. It's a couple of graphing calculators. Plus it would be a nice follow-up to that graphing calculator water-cooling experiment.
     
    Hey Linus! The YouTube bingo card is filled up! The power of the algorithm compels you!
     
    The set of calculators to benchmark (do double-check my list, there are similar models without Python support):
    NumWorks (model N110 preferably) Casio 35+E II (which should be a fx-9860GIII in North America) Casio 90+E (which should be a fx-CG50 in North America) TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python (not entirely sure if there's an international counterpart with Python support) If you can cozy up with manufacturers, official Python support is known to be in the works for the HP Prime (model G2 preferably) and the TI Nspire CX II (CAS or not).
     
    Suggested benchmarks:
    Integer (I suggest prime number determination and Bitcoin hash-rate) Floating-point (Riemann integral maybe?) Memory (TI-Planet has a script to allocate all the memory and print the capacity, do reset calculators beforehand) Fill rate (NumWorks has a nice Mandelbrot fractal sample, porting a bare-bones ray-tracer should be easy and TI-Planet has a cross-platform tech demo rendering of a radar) Turtle drawing speed at speed(0) And if you could put a small jab at TI for removing C and assembly features on the TI-83 Premium CE through software updates, thereby jeopardizing a rich history of video games and utilities, screwing over customers and every single developer who sank countless hours writing them, it'd be perfect.
  7. Like
    boricj got a reaction from Zodiark1593 in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    You know what's even better than a segment on TechLinked? Benchmarks.
     
    A set of products, each with different characteristics, but all capable of running a common set of workload with measurable performance data points.... With Python no less. It's actually perfect for a Linus Tech Tips video:
    Relatable: anyone aged between 15 and 40 has most likely used one for a couple of years. Jokes potential: come on, it's graphing calculators, that stuff basically writes itself. Unexpected turn of events: who would expect graphing calculators to have color screens and run Python nowadays? Plot twists: if you thought AMD is wrecking Intel big time, wait until you see a NumWorks utterly destroy a TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python. A moral lesson at the end: a household name is not a guarantee of bang for your buck. Now where did I see that before... And most important: cheap. It's a couple of graphing calculators. Plus it would be a nice follow-up to that graphing calculator water-cooling experiment.
     
    Hey Linus! The YouTube bingo card is filled up! The power of the algorithm compels you!
     
    The set of calculators to benchmark (do double-check my list, there are similar models without Python support):
    NumWorks (model N110 preferably) Casio 35+E II (which should be a fx-9860GIII in North America) Casio 90+E (which should be a fx-CG50 in North America) TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python (not entirely sure if there's an international counterpart with Python support) If you can cozy up with manufacturers, official Python support is known to be in the works for the HP Prime (model G2 preferably) and the TI Nspire CX II (CAS or not).
     
    Suggested benchmarks:
    Integer (I suggest prime number determination and Bitcoin hash-rate) Floating-point (Riemann integral maybe?) Memory (TI-Planet has a script to allocate all the memory and print the capacity, do reset calculators beforehand) Fill rate (NumWorks has a nice Mandelbrot fractal sample, porting a bare-bones ray-tracer should be easy and TI-Planet has a cross-platform tech demo rendering of a radar) Turtle drawing speed at speed(0) And if you could put a small jab at TI for removing C and assembly features on the TI-83 Premium CE through software updates, thereby jeopardizing a rich history of video games and utilities, screwing over customers and every single developer who sank countless hours writing them, it'd be perfect.
  8. Informative
    boricj reacted to TheLastMillennial in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    EDIT: A jailbreak has been released for OS 5.6.0 and below!
    You can find the topic about it here:
     
    Original post:
    I know I'm new to this forum, but I have been an active member of the calculator community for over 4 years. I'm trying to spread the word about this as much as I can, hopefully achieving a segment on TechLinked, and to give TI enough negative backlash to consider negotiating better terms with the community. I'll keep this article as an overview, but I'll link my in-depth sources at the end.
    If you want to get up to speed quickly, I made a video that summarizes the vast majority of all the information I've gathered across dozens of sources! There's a lot of information that wasn't covered in this thread so check it out if you want to know everything!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSkN0aMswXs
     
    What exactly happened?
    Just a few days ago, TI Education announced that the most recent OS for theTI-84 Plus CE (-T) and TI-83 Premium CE removes the ability for the calculator to run any Assembly (ASM) code. With the decision planned to go global, this means that any program written in ASM or C will not run on any CE operating on the newest TI OS 5.5.1 or higher!

    Click for animated PNG
    (Source: TI-Planet: Français | English)
     
    Why did this happen?
    One big factor in the decision to ban ASM was due to a video created by a student and a teacher that showed the exact steps to bypass a Test Mode restriction in OS 5.2.2, an obsolete, 3 year old OS. What made the matter worse is they passed the issue off as if it were still present in modern OSes! With the video gaining almost a quarter of a million views, TI thought they'd need to take some drastic measures to uphold their Exam Mode security reputation.
     
    Why is this so frustrating?
    This is quite a punch in the gut for the community, TI had given TI-Planet (a very reputable TI forum that has been reporting on calculator news for over a decade) a beta build of OS 5.5.0 to review and post about. This build given to TI-Planet had all the benifits of the new Python abilities, however ASM was not banned on this build. To the community, it looks like TI knew we would hate the removal of ASM and therefor gave a different build to us just to drum up support. Then when release date came, they pulled the rug from under our feet and released OS 5.5.1 instead which did include the ASM restrictions
     
    TI-Planet, has privately shared security flaws related to Exam Mode TI needed to fix, and kept vulnerabilities a secret as to not cause this exact situation. TI Planet has put so much meticulous care into protecting the hobby of thousands of students and future Computer Science Majors, like me, it's infuriating to see one clumsy video with a quarter of a million views set years of hard work go up in smoke.
     
    TI Planet's time trying to protect the community isn't the only thing wasted, the hundreds developer's countless hours spent creating amazing content from overclocking utilities, to math additions like CAS, and games will become obsolete when newer calculators inevitably outnumber older ones. TI does offer alternative programming options like TI-BASIC and Python, but as TI Planet user jean-baptiste boric points out on Cemetech:
    Source: Cemetech: English
     
    It's also infuriating that TI's consistent reactions of killing a fly with a sledge hammer has done nothing to solve their security, in fact it has only worsened it. I think forum Planet Casio explains it better than I can:
    Note: I have paraphrased the French to English translation in order to make it sound as coherent as possible.
    (Source: Planète Casio: Français | English)
     
    Now that ASM is banned and this situation can't get much worse, the community is already finding exploits that allows not only the ability to run ASM code anyways, but ways to bypass TI's insecure Exam Mode (which was only ever 'secure' because the community was careful not to release the exploits to the public). The community is already brainstorming alternatives that will both satisfy TI and the dedicated programming community. We're doing our best to come to terms with TI and avoid creating another cat-and-mouse game of finding and patching exploits (which happened on the Nspire).
     
    Conclusion:
    Like I said at the beginning, my goal is to spread the word about this as much as I can. Although this is only effecting the CE line up of calculators right now, TI has not ruled out releasing updates to older models that also bans ASM.
    (Source: An e-mail from TI-Cares posted on TI-Planet: Français | English)
     
    Sources:
    These go more in-depth than I did in this article. TI-Planet's 20 year history of ASM on calculators is a particularly great read.
    Cemetech:
    TI Removes ASM/C Programming from TI-83 Premium CE: English
    TI-83 Premium CE/TI-84 Plus CE ASM/C Removal: Updates: English
     
    Planet Casio:
    TI supprime les programmes assembleur sur TI-83 Premium CE et 84+ CE version 5.5: Français
    TI removes assembly programs on TI-83 Premium CE and 84+ CE version 5.5: English
     
    ticalc:
    TI removes access to assembly programs on the TI-83 Premium CE: English
     
    TI-Planet:
    Mise à jour 5.5 supprime assembleur TI-83 Premium CE & 84+CE: Français
    Update 5.5 removes TI-83 Premium CE & 84 + CE assembler: English
  9. Agree
    boricj got a reaction from TheLastMillennial in Texas Instruments Bans all ASM Programs/ Games on TI-84 Plus CE Calculators.   
    You know what's even better than a segment on TechLinked? Benchmarks.
     
    A set of products, each with different characteristics, but all capable of running a common set of workload with measurable performance data points.... With Python no less. It's actually perfect for a Linus Tech Tips video:
    Relatable: anyone aged between 15 and 40 has most likely used one for a couple of years. Jokes potential: come on, it's graphing calculators, that stuff basically writes itself. Unexpected turn of events: who would expect graphing calculators to have color screens and run Python nowadays? Plot twists: if you thought AMD is wrecking Intel big time, wait until you see a NumWorks utterly destroy a TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python. A moral lesson at the end: a household name is not a guarantee of bang for your buck. Now where did I see that before... And most important: cheap. It's a couple of graphing calculators. Plus it would be a nice follow-up to that graphing calculator water-cooling experiment.
     
    Hey Linus! The YouTube bingo card is filled up! The power of the algorithm compels you!
     
    The set of calculators to benchmark (do double-check my list, there are similar models without Python support):
    NumWorks (model N110 preferably) Casio 35+E II (which should be a fx-9860GIII in North America) Casio 90+E (which should be a fx-CG50 in North America) TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python (not entirely sure if there's an international counterpart with Python support) If you can cozy up with manufacturers, official Python support is known to be in the works for the HP Prime (model G2 preferably) and the TI Nspire CX II (CAS or not).
     
    Suggested benchmarks:
    Integer (I suggest prime number determination and Bitcoin hash-rate) Floating-point (Riemann integral maybe?) Memory (TI-Planet has a script to allocate all the memory and print the capacity, do reset calculators beforehand) Fill rate (NumWorks has a nice Mandelbrot fractal sample, porting a bare-bones ray-tracer should be easy and TI-Planet has a cross-platform tech demo rendering of a radar) Turtle drawing speed at speed(0) And if you could put a small jab at TI for removing C and assembly features on the TI-83 Premium CE through software updates, thereby jeopardizing a rich history of video games and utilities, screwing over customers and every single developer who sank countless hours writing them, it'd be perfect.
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