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gjsman

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About gjsman

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  1. You can tell how massive the early padding is whenever you right-click the Desktop or something in Finally Explorer. Hopefully this is only for touchscreens, because look at the padding differences compared to each other. Right-clicking the Documents folder, the classic menu fits 50% more items in 20% less space.
  2. The only other thing I would say at this point is the way that Microsoft got around huge File Explorer menus is, in my mind, the jankiest thing ever. You right-click and you get a new, modern-UI-style, huge padding menu with very few but most commonly used options. At the bottom of this right-click menu, you have a button called "Show more options." Clicking it closes the right-click menu and opens the old, massive right-click menu and all of the submenus with in it. So that's just great. Want to create a shortcut on your Desktop? It's right-click > Show More Options > Send T
  3. I have a 6th gen desktop with a Core i5-6500, would be pretty sweet if it got Windows 11. Testing on my MacBook Pro with 7th gen, I've only run into a few issues with this build: - Once, the new Start Menu crashed on me, and clicking the Start button from there on out opened the old, Windows 10 Start Menu until I logged out and back in. So the old Start menu is still there, and possibly even loaded in the background? - Also strange foreshadowing, I once had the taskbar glitch on me and had a second set of taskbar icons appear underneath the main taskbar. However this "u
  4. Strangely, even though I have the latest build (22000.51), I don't have the new Windows Store, only the old one. Still figuring out what's up with that. Maybe the Education edition I'm using doesn't have the new Store in it's build?
  5. They literally posted on Windows Blog, today, that the TPM requirement and Secure Boot requirements are non-negotiable and they are sticking with the 8th gen requirement, and possibly considering adding some 7th gen SKUs maybe. They aren't recommendations, they are what Microsoft considers requirements. Of course, you can patch your way around them if you know what you are doing, but they are still hard requirements for 99.9% of people. https://blogs.windows.com/windows-insider/2021/06/28/update-on-windows-11-minimum-system-requirements/ I'll have to make like a vide
  6. Also, for any Microsoft employees reading this, your talk about how you are requiring specs way above this for an optimal experience is... not true in a million ways. This thing performs beautifully, UI animations don't have any dropped frames, the fan doesn't want to ramp up easily, the experience is just fine thank you very much. And if it's just fantastic on my dual-core 7th gen Core i5 with integrated graphics, it will be just fine on a 7700K with an RTX 3080, and you know it.
  7. Hello, Considering the recent incredible system requirements for Windows 11, I thought maybe there'd be room for a thread about installing Windows 11 on hardware that Microsoft wouldn't have expected and theoretically should not be compatible. A little bit of playful "screw your requirements." I submit my first entry, a MacBook Pro 2017 which has no TPM, no Secure Boot, and a 7th Gen Intel Processor. This one also was patched and ran the leaked build of Windows 11 the first day that got out of the lab, which definitely wasn't intended.
  8. Emm... No? They dropped it because it couldn't run Metal API, so even if you patch it to run the next version of MacOS, you have no hardware acceleration at all. Considering it had a 10 year run and it was a new API, I'm not upset because otherwise it could go on forever.
  9. I might have been OK with TPM 2.0, and even OK with 8th Gen requirement, if they told us about it in the presentation and gave good, understandable, clear reasons why deprecating so many systems on the market makes sense to do. But they didn't do that, or even mention this in the presentation, which begs the question what were they even thinking, because even a little foresight would suggest that people might be upset about the new requirements and have questions, right? At the same time though, this lack of foresight is not new for Microsoft executives. Thurrott was telling a stor
  10. The problem with this theory is that most of the 8th gen processors do not have full Spectre/Meltdown protections even though they are supported, and if you go by what the Security Director said, mitigations are not the reason why.
  11. What planned obsolescence? My grandparents have a 2011 iMac, it just lost support this year, a decade after launch. Apple gives most Macs about 7 years of major updates, but Windows users seem to forget that each version of MacOS gets 2-3 years of security updates after the next version of MacOS comes out. Once you factor that in, you get about a decade in support for each Mac on average, and sometimes more. Bought a 2013 MacBook? It's last supported version is Big Sur, but going by past precedent, that will be in support until late 2022 to early 2023. Bought a 2014 Mac mini? It just made the
  12. To dismiss criticism of Windows or Mac with "switch to Linux" simply isn't practical for most people.
  13. If I was Apple, I would hold back my MacBook Pros with M1X and MiniLED options until about a week after Windows 11 launches. I'd let the headlines of people unable to upgrade from processor incompatibilities to TPM problems to GPT partitioning errors, along with all the controversial changes like the Start Menu position changing and the unmovable taskbar dominate the headlines. Then I'd yell "Bombs away!" And I'd point out in my event how long old Macs are supported especially compared to those guys in Redmond whose own executives can't figure out what works.
  14. The pandemic has apparently turned the Microsoft vs Apple rivalry upside down. We entered the pandemic in 2020 with Apple being expensive, slow, and we mocked their "early obsolescence" compared to Windows devices. Now here we are. They're winning the $1000 price target, are fast and fanless, and Windows is the one with early obsolescence. Furthermore, what's also very interesting to watch is how both sides are doubling down in their strategy. Apple is doubling-down on Apple Silicon with an Intel to ARM translator. Microsoft is doubling down on Intel, with an ARM to Intel translat
  15. Why else would Panos say "Intel is doing great things with their 11th gen CPUs" out of the blue for absolutely no reason in the announcement, or speak so approvingly of the Intel Bridge technology that Intel so graciously provided for allowing Android apps to run.
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