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SavageNeo

Member
  • Content Count

    7,044
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Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Nykie in New Build for Gaming/Web Design   
    what shops are you using? there are some minor things to tweak like looking at different psu, ssd and motherboard options. not that they are not good, but there can be better ones
  2. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Fasauceome in Hitting power limit what to do?   
    you should try upping the voltage a little bit. also use GPU Z to determine the limiting factor of the oc
  3. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Mel0nMan in 1660 super display issue?   
    so you tested the gpu in a different system?
     
    If it did not work either you should RMA the gpu.
     
    also what was the first psu and system?
  4. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from LauriHimself in 3080 Ti arrived, pc won't eve start. 750w too low?   
    your pc wil start with even that psu. 
     
    whtie led is usually VGA.
     
    is your monitor plugged in to the gpu and not in to the motherboard?
     
    can you try different pci e slot? 
  5. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from freeagent in R7 5800x on X470 Pro + Noctua D15 Temps   
    5900x still runs higher on all core load.
    5900x on stock settings should do 4.3-4.5ghz on all core load. so if you OC to 4.2ghz you are downcloking the cpu.
  6. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from iamthatuiu in rgb problem corsair lol   
    from Corsair's website
     
  7. Funny
    SavageNeo reacted to xXDuckzXx in Power issues   
    Months later I just Noticed I never screwed in the CPU Cooler all the way...
  8. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from typographie in Do power supplies really matter that much?   
    rtx 3070 uses around 250w of power and r5 3600 under 100 so together if 100% stressed (not realistic) they will use around 350w.
     
    add fans, storage, ram and motherboard to mix and your system will consume liuttle over 400w at full load. it will be lower when gaming.
     
    @Mark Kainedid run rtx 3070 and r5 3600 with not the best 500w psu just fine. 
     
     
    so you want atlerast a good 500w psu.
     
  9. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from LauriHimself in Help! PC Crashing   
    yes. but is is disabled by default. if you never have enabled it, your ram runs at 2133mhz. 
  10. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Chris Pratt in CPU/GPU usage not maxed FPS limit not reached   
    Yes. If single cores hit 100% it is a bottleneck. total cpu usage does not mean that much. look at single core usages.
     
     
  11. Informative
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Somerandomtechyboi in CPU/GPU usage not maxed FPS limit not reached   
    Yes. If single cores hit 100% it is a bottleneck. total cpu usage does not mean that much. look at single core usages.
     
     
  12. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from IkeaGnome in CPU/GPU usage not maxed FPS limit not reached   
    Yes. If single cores hit 100% it is a bottleneck. total cpu usage does not mean that much. look at single core usages.
     
     
  13. Agree
    SavageNeo reacted to fuzz0r in help me with my pc   
    It means that some of the SATA ports for harddrives won't work if you install an m.2.
    Like mechanical harddrives, they use SATA.
  14. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from RapidTurtle in How much performace is lost, i paired a i79700 with a ex b365m-v5 motherboard   
    You are assuming wrong. your motherboard has a power limit somewhere. 
    i7 9700 should consume over 120-140w. 
     

    You can try to go to bios and disable the power limit if you can find it. if not then there is nothing you can really do except undervolt so you can  get lower power usage and better clock speeds
  15. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Iphone4 in Doubts on Motherboard   
    b450-f is usually overpriced for what it is. like you can usually get Msi b550-A pro for the same price.
     
     
    I would not get the b450-f. its just basic b450 board with little beefier VRMs and RGB. 
  16. Informative
    SavageNeo got a reaction from HanZie82 in I ran my ram above max speed   
    that is usually not long enough. my friend took the battery off for 10minutes. it was not enough. Then he kept it off overnight and then it worked.
     
     
    @Perfectpolaryou can also reset bios via the cmos pins. You can google how to use the cmos pins on your mobo
  17. Like
    SavageNeo reacted to Lafosse64 in Need help DOWNGRADING Graphics Card (gtx 1050 to gtx 210)   
    Great, thanks to all of you, really. Thanks for your time @SavageNeo @Bananasplit_00 and the rest. Ill get it done. 
  18. Funny
    SavageNeo reacted to Bombastinator in Should I Replace 5+ yo PSU?   
    *wanders off to find out what “double forward group regulation” is*
  19. Informative
    SavageNeo got a reaction from dustin85841 in 5800x hot hot hot   
    5800x is hard to cool. even harder than 5900x. 
     
    It has only 1 CXX so it makes the cooling harder since the cores are closer together than they would be with 2 or 4 CXXs
  20. Agree
    SavageNeo reacted to IIIIIIIIII in PSU Dropping while playing   
    The voltage measurements on the motherboard are mostly inaccurate. However...
     
    It's actually a terrible PSU. Because it is group regulated, it cannot handle cross loads properly. They also omitted several protection circuits.
     
    Besides, the warranty is also almost over, so if I were you, I'd replace it even if it was OK.
  21. Like
    SavageNeo reacted to epicweed504 in Hdd won't load   
    Problem solved.
    Had to dissamble psu entirely and clean the crap out of it 🙂
  22. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from panzersharkcat in PC Specs Are Officially Meaningless - Corsair One a200   
    First glance of the case tells me it can't
     
    After the vid: Yeah i was right.
  23. Like
    SavageNeo got a reaction from IkeaGnome in Building Budget PC Help   
    he has 1050ti..
  24. Informative
    SavageNeo reacted to mariushm in PSU efficiency stuff   
    The AC voltage has to be rectified into DC using a bridge rectifier (or 2/several in parallel to reduce voltage drop and dissipate heat across rectifiers) 
    A bridge rectifier consists of 4 diode, 2 of them are always operating ... so you get some voltage drop across the diodes as input voltage is rectified.
     
    The power dissipated in the bridge rectifier will be higher at higher currents ... for example let's say to produce 400 watts to components, the power supply needs to draw 4A of current at 110v , but only 2A of current at 230v AC.
    The losses in the bridge rectifier are approximately P = 2 diodes x 1v (voltage drop on diode inside rectifier) x Current   ... so at 110v you'd have 8 watts of wasted energy, at 230v you'd have only 3-4 watts.
     
    After the AC voltage is converted to DC, that DC voltage with lots of fluctuations is boosted to around 400-420v DC using the active PFC circuit. The reason this is done is because you can store more energy in that bulk capacitor this way (giving the psu enough energy to last a few milliseconds in case there's a hiccup in the power grid) and because it makes possible to use much smaller transformers  and higher frequencies (the power supply sends tens to hundreds of thousands of 400v-ish pulses through the transformer and out comes nearly 12v DC on the other side.
     
    That active PFC circuit has lower losses if it only has to boost from around 300v  to 400-420v  compared to boosting from around 180v.
    Rectified AC has a peak of 1.414xVac so for 230v input you'll have a peak of around 325v DC and on 110v AC you'd have a peak of around 175v DC.
     
    So the two above are just two of the reasons why running a power supply with a higher input AC voltage results in much higher efficiency.
     
     
    Fun fact .. There are ICs which rectify AC voltage using mosfets instead of diodes, so the losses are much lower ... like orders of magnitude lower, depending on what mosfets you choose.
    For example see LT4320 : https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/data-sheets/4320fb.pdf
     
    Problem is a lot of these including the above can't handle high voltages, the above only goes up to 72v DC so you can't rectify the 230v input of a psu.  But they're useful for example if you make a class D or class AB audio amplifier that run on 24-48v DC ... such chips help save 5-10 watts of heat which means you can use smaller heatsinks in such audio amplifiers or cheaper bulk capacitors.
     
    There's also a class of power supplies that don't use bridge rectifiers to rectify the AC voltage to DC ...they use some other techniques to convert to DC and boost to high voltage... but it's hard for me to explain how they do it.
     
     
  25. Agree
    SavageNeo got a reaction from Mel0nMan in PC Specs Are Officially Meaningless - Corsair One a200   
    First glance of the case tells me it can't
     
    After the vid: Yeah i was right.
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