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comander

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  1. Agree
    comander got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in Why you can't simulate an universe - interesting paradox   
    It's not possible to perfectly stimulate our universe within our universe. 
     
    You could approximate - imagine a game where details are only drawn in as needed. 
     
    -----
     
    It is possible to stimulate a full, simpler universe within a universe. Slap on a few more dimensions for the base reality and see what happens. 
  2. Agree
    comander reacted to FreddZeppelin in Choosing what I do for the foreseeable future   
    Lots of good advice here.  My two cents:
    Think now, before you begin, about what courses you want to take in high school.  Does your school offer honors or AP classes?  If so, think now about what requirements you need to fulfill to qualify for them.  For example, math and science courses often have a strictly-tiered progression and it can be difficult to qualify for some of the more advanced classes later if you delayed the introductory courses. It sounds like your interests are in math and technical areas, which is great.  But also pay attention to those courses that round out your knowledge and skill set.  For example, it's great to know the technical side of things, but it's even better to also be able to write about it - to convey your technical knowledge in a way that the non-techies of the world can understand.  It's tempting to ignore that required English class or the seemingly irrelevant research paper for History class - but don't.  There are lots of people who have technical knowledge, but far fewer who can convey that knowledge in non-technical terms.   And after you've done all that (easy, right?), don't be afraid to take something just because it sounds interesting or different from your normal routine.  Your interests likely will change a bit over time and you'll likely discover areas of study that never would have occurred to you in the beginning - but you'll never know unless you look around a bit.  This is particularly true, and can be difficult, if your primary focus is in math, science or another technical field.  Does your school offer an Economics class?  Can't hurt to learn a bit about how that part of the world works.  Take an art class if you feel inspired.  You never know where that could lead - someone, after all, had to come up with the physical design for the iPhone.     If you find yourself having to choose between two otherwise equal courses, take the one taught by the teacher/professor who is really known for that class.  Far better to learn from someone who has a passion for their subject than someone who is just teaching a course.  My son, who had a heavy STEM focus, took a Russian literature course to fulfill his humanities requirement just because the teacher was known to be outstanding -- he says it was easily the most interesting course he ever took and, for that reason, the easiest and most fulfilling to write about, even for an otherwise tech-focused guy.        The advice not to load up on too many "resume filler" extracurriculars is spot on.  Far better to show passion for a few things than to dabble in many.  Pick something at your school that you enjoy and work to excel at it.  My two kids took very different paths - a sport for one and robotics for the other - but both demonstrated a commitment to their chosen endeavor that definitely helped them with college applications.  It truly doesn't matter what it is - just demonstrate a passion and commitment to it. Finally, think a bit about what you can do with your summers.  It's definitely OK to have some downtime - you really don't have to focus every waking minute on The Plan.  Can you do something really focused that will advance your goals in an extracurricular endeavor?  When in doubt, if you can, get a job.  Any job - fine if it meshes nicely with The Plan, but you'll learn lot about yourself and life just by working a job.  Simply put, nothing so focuses the mind on the value of study as punching a time clock.   Good luck!    
  3. Agree
    comander got a reaction from Wictorian in Why you can't simulate an universe - interesting paradox   
    It's not possible to perfectly stimulate our universe within our universe. 
     
    You could approximate - imagine a game where details are only drawn in as needed. 
     
    -----
     
    It is possible to stimulate a full, simpler universe within a universe. Slap on a few more dimensions for the base reality and see what happens. 
  4. Like
    comander got a reaction from Sir Asvald in Choosing what I do for the foreseeable future   
    The very fact that you're asking HELPs a lot. Feel free to PM me if you want to go 1:1 a bit. 

    Also as an FYI, while where in college you should error on the side of the EASIEST classes that check the box, during HS, doing all the hardest is the way forward (at least if your goal is Harvard - HS classes are so standardized that they're easy to judge and if someone took 6 years of science classes [summer session at your HS and then one at a nearby university - just be aware that you probably want to take the easiest joke of a college class possible - think Rocks for Jocks and not Quantum Physics] while you did 3, guess who looks better), assuming you can get high marks. State and local schools might have their own formula (in California for example I believe the CSUs just use a formula based on GPA +SAT/ACT without considering much else, though the UCs actually look at classes and care about "A-G requirements" being met - though I haven't really checked these requirements in ~15 years and I was WAY over them[but my grades were trash as I planned on doing community college anyway - As on tests Fs on homework won't make you valedictorian]) - Also for ECs consider open source projects. They'll take anyone and it's relevant to tech stuff.
     
     
    I'm going to copy/paste my GRE tips (with the SAT vocab links swapped). The GRE is made by the same company that does the SAT and it's for getting into Master/PhD programs. The tests are surprisingly similar with the main difference being that it's often the same kinds of questions but a bit trickier on the GRE. Also some college math (e.g. boolean algebra, combinatorics) can simplify the a GRE math problem making it easier bit isn't strictly required. 

    ------
     
    Master the basics BEFORE DOING MANY QUESTIONS. Good questions are finite and valuable. 
     
    1. Get good at mental math. Focus on accuracy over speed. Get to where it’s almost effortless. Focus on getting good at the super easy stuff first. If I got one question wrong on math, I’d start over.
      1a. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=io.ts.mathworkout
      1b. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.oddrobo.komjfree
      1c. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.magoosh.gre.flashcards.mental_math&hl=en
      1d. Be able to quickly and easily do prime factorizations 1:100
      1e. Be able to quickly and easily square 1:25
      1f. Know (or be able to intuit) basic formulas - https://magoosh.com/gre/2016/gre-math-formula-ebook/ https://www.prepscholar.com/gre/blog/gre-math-formulas-cheat-sheet/

    2. Get better at reading for comprehension
      2a. https://magoosh.com/gre/2015/active-reading-strategies-for-the-gre/
      2b. Research and practice mindfulness meditation (great if your mind wanders while reading)
     
    3. Learn the vocab (this is likely to be the most different from the SAT, get the SAT version of the app)
      3a. https://sat.magoosh.com/flashcards/vocabulary
      3b. https://sat.magoosh.com/flashcards/vocabulary/decks
      3c. Try stringing flashcard words together (make a sentence including the last 2-4 vocab words you had)

    4. General advice
      4a. https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/zen-boot-camp-for-the-gmat/
      4b. Exercise where you can (I took the stairs, did push ups while making tea, etc.)
      4c. Rest. I took a little bit of PTO here and there
      4d. Know how long you need to average per problem
      4e. Develop notation for taking notes.
      4f. Be able to write exactly WHAT the problem is asking for for all problems. 
    When I got a problem, I wrote, in shorthand, what they wanted to have solved before even starting
      4g. On your scratch paper when doing the exam, rate your confidence 1-10. Revisit problems in order of confidence for review.
      4h. Take advantage of periods of motivation and study MORE. If dismotivated go have fun
      4i. Have fun every so often
      4j. Trick yourself into thinking what you’re doing is important. Use peer pressure. Have a goal to beat. I was in the top 1% overall, can you get close?
     
    5. Do 1000-2000 practice problems (1-3 rounds of ALL the Magoosh problems)
      5a. Do them 1 after the other. Focus on correctness above speed. 
      5b. Immediately review anything you got wrong, guessed on or were slow at. Think of how you could do better. If you got it wrong, see if you can figure out where you went wrong before the video explanation. 
     
    6. Do 1-4 practice tests, do these mostly towards the end. 
  5. Informative
    comander got a reaction from HelpfulTechWizard in Choosing what I do for the foreseeable future   
    Some of my "general philosophies" on careerism and life. This is targeted at an 18 year old but if you do this at the start of high school your application to colleges will be better with way less effort. 
     
    1. If you're not well-connected, going to an "elite" university helps. If you are... it matters less. If you're not at an "elite" place - transfer.
    2. What you major in doesn't matter THAT much. Choose the easiest relevant thing. GRADE INFLATE. Screw "personal growth" and "I should learn this" prioritize easiness and gaming the system for a high GPA. If you feel you MUST study something... that's what minors are for. One good way to grade inflate is to pre-learn a subject during summer/winter/spring breaks. CrashCourse on YouTube is good fun. Khan academy can help too. If you have a rough feel for what a course is about before taking it (even if it's not a perfect match) and you watched it for fun and enjoyed yourself, you'll find that the stuff you hear in class makes a lot more sense. 
    3. Plan your 4 year's of classes in advance (you can always change). 1-2 nights of planning can save you 1-2 years of correcting mistakes. 
    4. Resume build and start early. Start SOMEWHERE (any job, any RELEVANT volunteer work, any club LEADERSHIP[member/attendee doesn't count]) and progressively improve (more relevant, more renowned). Worst case scenario you later say during an interview - "I did XYZ and my big take away from that is I want a job that _____ which is why I'm interested in THIS role." You should aim to be attached to impressive sounding things (big projects, important people) while putting in the least time/effort possible.
    5. Resume prep HARD. https://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/free-investment-banking-resume-template/ - https://mipt.ru/upload/medialibrary/644/consulting-resume-cl-tips-by-victor-cheng.pdf - use these concepts and adapt to tech/IT as an industry. It's worked for me (interviewed and got offers from places like Amazon, Facebook, Google, etc.). After you have an OK resume (for what content you have) get someone to suggest edits/improvements. Go back and forth until you get diminishing returns. 
    6. Interview prep - take your resume bullets and write paragraphs for each one. Include [who, what, when, where, why, how, how much]. NAME DROP titles/companies/technologies used. Get someone to review your work. YOU WANT SOMEONE WITH VERY HIGH STANDARDS that's sophisticated. Having someone at LinkedIn or Netflix review your resume is probably better than a guy pushing shopping carts at Walmart. 
    7. SAT/ACT/GRE/GMAT prep - DO IT. Get good at it ASAP. Get really good at BASIC math (arithmetic - get an app like King of Math), vocab (Magoosh SAT words) and practice active reading[summarize what you just read very briefly]. It'll improve your class grades - imagine cutting careless errors on math exams by half and having 10 more minutes during tests for the harder stuff plus more energy since the basics are easy. 100 hours and $100 of prep can get you $20,000 worth of scholarships. That's $200/hr... or if you're working at minimum wage that's ~1500 hours.
    8. Don't do 500 different things. Do 2-4 core things at a time, VERY well. It might be something like [club board member + classes + sports] or [part time job + classes + large coding project].
  6. Informative
    comander got a reaction from HelpfulTechWizard in Choosing what I do for the foreseeable future   
    The very fact that you're asking HELPs a lot. Feel free to PM me if you want to go 1:1 a bit. 

    Also as an FYI, while where in college you should error on the side of the EASIEST classes that check the box, during HS, doing all the hardest is the way forward (at least if your goal is Harvard - HS classes are so standardized that they're easy to judge and if someone took 6 years of science classes [summer session at your HS and then one at a nearby university - just be aware that you probably want to take the easiest joke of a college class possible - think Rocks for Jocks and not Quantum Physics] while you did 3, guess who looks better), assuming you can get high marks. State and local schools might have their own formula (in California for example I believe the CSUs just use a formula based on GPA +SAT/ACT without considering much else, though the UCs actually look at classes and care about "A-G requirements" being met - though I haven't really checked these requirements in ~15 years and I was WAY over them[but my grades were trash as I planned on doing community college anyway - As on tests Fs on homework won't make you valedictorian]) - Also for ECs consider open source projects. They'll take anyone and it's relevant to tech stuff.
     
     
    I'm going to copy/paste my GRE tips (with the SAT vocab links swapped). The GRE is made by the same company that does the SAT and it's for getting into Master/PhD programs. The tests are surprisingly similar with the main difference being that it's often the same kinds of questions but a bit trickier on the GRE. Also some college math (e.g. boolean algebra, combinatorics) can simplify the a GRE math problem making it easier bit isn't strictly required. 

    ------
     
    Master the basics BEFORE DOING MANY QUESTIONS. Good questions are finite and valuable. 
     
    1. Get good at mental math. Focus on accuracy over speed. Get to where it’s almost effortless. Focus on getting good at the super easy stuff first. If I got one question wrong on math, I’d start over.
      1a. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=io.ts.mathworkout
      1b. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.oddrobo.komjfree
      1c. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.magoosh.gre.flashcards.mental_math&hl=en
      1d. Be able to quickly and easily do prime factorizations 1:100
      1e. Be able to quickly and easily square 1:25
      1f. Know (or be able to intuit) basic formulas - https://magoosh.com/gre/2016/gre-math-formula-ebook/ https://www.prepscholar.com/gre/blog/gre-math-formulas-cheat-sheet/

    2. Get better at reading for comprehension
      2a. https://magoosh.com/gre/2015/active-reading-strategies-for-the-gre/
      2b. Research and practice mindfulness meditation (great if your mind wanders while reading)
     
    3. Learn the vocab (this is likely to be the most different from the SAT, get the SAT version of the app)
      3a. https://sat.magoosh.com/flashcards/vocabulary
      3b. https://sat.magoosh.com/flashcards/vocabulary/decks
      3c. Try stringing flashcard words together (make a sentence including the last 2-4 vocab words you had)

    4. General advice
      4a. https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/zen-boot-camp-for-the-gmat/
      4b. Exercise where you can (I took the stairs, did push ups while making tea, etc.)
      4c. Rest. I took a little bit of PTO here and there
      4d. Know how long you need to average per problem
      4e. Develop notation for taking notes.
      4f. Be able to write exactly WHAT the problem is asking for for all problems. 
    When I got a problem, I wrote, in shorthand, what they wanted to have solved before even starting
      4g. On your scratch paper when doing the exam, rate your confidence 1-10. Revisit problems in order of confidence for review.
      4h. Take advantage of periods of motivation and study MORE. If dismotivated go have fun
      4i. Have fun every so often
      4j. Trick yourself into thinking what you’re doing is important. Use peer pressure. Have a goal to beat. I was in the top 1% overall, can you get close?
     
    5. Do 1000-2000 practice problems (1-3 rounds of ALL the Magoosh problems)
      5a. Do them 1 after the other. Focus on correctness above speed. 
      5b. Immediately review anything you got wrong, guessed on or were slow at. Think of how you could do better. If you got it wrong, see if you can figure out where you went wrong before the video explanation. 
     
    6. Do 1-4 practice tests, do these mostly towards the end. 
  7. Informative
    comander got a reaction from Orian Pax in what education do i need to write softwares like youtube-dl?   
    Freecodecamp has beginners sections that cover the basics. The resource is good enough that you would be fine if you just dug into that one and made reasonable progress. 
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/FreeCodeCamp
     
    -----------
     
    As an FYI freecodecamp is interactive and has you type in code to solve small tasks. It's much more efficient than a 4 hour youtube video that you'll forget much of.
     
    At some level, go through the basics of something like python and then learn new packages and frameworks as needed. 
  8. Like
    comander got a reaction from linuxChips2600 in How come PCs use so little power compared to other machines?   
    Virtually no one who actually designs CPU architectures has obsessed about RISC vs CISC differences in around 15-25 years. At the end of the day RISC mostly won the war and both AMD and Intel borrow heavily from the concept. What do you think a micro-op cache is for?


    Since the 1990s, x86 CISC CPUs convert a lot of their workload into RISC-like instructions and do RISC stuff internally
    (lol AMD K7 <- 20 year old article talking about how it wasn't really and issue anymore)

    There's some overhead for converting the x86/x87 ISAs into something that works with RISC philosophies but it's pretty minimal when you're talking about parts with hundreds of thousands times more transistors in them than were present in processors when the original RISC vs CISC debate occurred. How a chip is designed and implemented matters A LOT MORE than a dash of legacy baggage in the design. 

    Similarly, "proper" RISC CPUs have had increasingly growing instruction sets. It's not a slim, reduced instruction set part if it's got more instructions than early CISC parts. Take a look at the IBM G5 (which was more power hungry and less energy efficient than x86 parts despite being a "proper" RISC design)

    At the end of the day, both design philosophies have limits and face similar tradeoffs so you get a lot of convergence in how things are done. 

    If you're talking about ARM vs x86... ARM has less baggage because it's newer. x86 has... billions and billions of more dollars tossed into its development. Both have niches that they've grown into, where ARM optimizes for perf/watt in small systems and x86 optimizes for perf/watt in bigger systems AT A SYSTEM LEVEL. Whenever ARM has tried to touch x86 in terms of overall performance, its power efficiency characteristics went to trash. At 2W, ARM designs are generally more efficient. At 30W, x86 gets WAY ahead.

    ----

    https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/courses/soco/projects/risc/developments/index.html

     
  9. Agree
    comander got a reaction from wamred in Windows 10 bug corrupts your hard drive on seeing this file's icon.   
    Also have a cold spare of anything you TRULY care about. 
  10. Agree
    comander got a reaction from Cyberspirit in Windows 10 bug corrupts your hard drive on seeing this file's icon.   
    Also have a cold spare of anything you TRULY care about. 
  11. Funny
    comander reacted to cm992 in Intel Demoes i9-11900K Against Ryzen 9 5900X   
    Crap now I need a Z590 mobo and an i9-11900K to maintain my epic gamer clout
  12. Agree
    comander got a reaction from Arika S in Sand mining causes enviromental Damage?   
    1. We aren't "running out of sand" - we're running out of sand that's cheap to mine. There's a boatload of sand that people don't care to use (bad properties) for construction or is located in places that require too much in transport costs. 
    2. Basically everything people do has an environmental impact. Chickens from 1950 look quite different from current ones. 
  13. Informative
    comander got a reaction from whm1974 in Sand mining causes enviromental Damage?   
    the issues are either the sand is too fine (getting tiny specks to combine is hard) or too coarse (the other extreme is breaking tiny rocks repeatedly). This is assuming the sand is of the right element. 
     
    I'm outside my wheelhouse though - all I can say is that it's expensive. We'd need multiple technological breakthroughs to deal with this - in some mix of energy efficiency, mining or transit. 
     
     
  14. Agree
    comander got a reaction from DriftMan in Sand mining causes enviromental Damage?   
    1. We aren't "running out of sand" - we're running out of sand that's cheap to mine. There's a boatload of sand that people don't care to use (bad properties) for construction or is located in places that require too much in transport costs. 
    2. Basically everything people do has an environmental impact. Chickens from 1950 look quite different from current ones. 
  15. Agree
    comander got a reaction from GDRRiley in How bad is this $5000 PC from 10 years ago?   
    X58 (4C/8T) would've gotten you ~30% more single/lightly threaded performance and ~85% of the MT performance... while being way cheaper and more energy efficient. 
     
    I'm pretty sure it would've been SATAII. 

    Max sata speed doesn't matter THAT much anyway though, at least for general use (not as certain about how video editing works wrt queue depth and whatnot)
  16. Agree
    comander got a reaction from Rybo in Tech Stocks   
    If you don't have insider information... ETF. 

    Get VOO or VFIAX and set a rule e.g. "I won't touch this for the next 5 years". 

    You'll thank yourself later. 
  17. Agree
    comander got a reaction from JoeyDM in Tech Stocks   
    It's NOT a good insurance though. In the extreme edge case (basically 0% chance of happening) you'd likely be brutalized for it - "stop hitting me, the gold is in this spot"
     

     
     
  18. Informative
    comander got a reaction from TempestCatto in Tech Stocks   
    If you don't have insider information... ETF. 

    Get VOO or VFIAX and set a rule e.g. "I won't touch this for the next 5 years". 

    You'll thank yourself later. 
  19. Like
    comander got a reaction from StDragon in Tech Stocks   
    If you don't have insider information... ETF. 

    Get VOO or VFIAX and set a rule e.g. "I won't touch this for the next 5 years". 

    You'll thank yourself later. 
  20. Like
    comander got a reaction from Nicnac in Tech Stocks   
    If you don't have insider information... ETF. 

    Get VOO or VFIAX and set a rule e.g. "I won't touch this for the next 5 years". 

    You'll thank yourself later. 
  21. Funny
    comander got a reaction from Merr125 in UPS delays delivering Newegg packages, among others due to shipping limits   
    Definitely delays. 

    I just got the heated toilet seat/bidet I ordered a while back last night. 

    How else am I supposed to make sure that my girlfriend's bum is warm and well attended to?
  22. Like
    comander reacted to Commodus in What are some good things that happened to you this year?   
    Got engaged -- the easy winner in my case!
     
    I also largely recovered from a nerve injury (I overextended myself at the gym last year) and should be on track for a full recovery.
  23. Like
    comander got a reaction from PlayStation 2 in Planned obsolescence and Disposible Tech.   
    1. Honda and Toyota completely changed the market. In the 1970s during the oil shortage, inexpensive, long lasting vehicles that consumed far less fuel were in great demand. 
    2. There's an entire used car market. The market dynamics are very very influenced by how long cars last. 100k miles was a lot in 1970 and it's nothing now. I got rid of my old truck at 200k. My father has a goal of hitting 500k on his diesel truck. 
     
     
    For what it's worth I am reasonably well off (could buy a half dozen new cars, cash) and don't care much about how cars look. My main factors are TCO and safety. Longevity plays into TCO. 
     
    I'll admit I cared a bit more when I was a starving college student and when I was insecure. 
  24. Like
    comander got a reaction from PlayStation 2 in Planned obsolescence and Disposible Tech.   
    Those devices also usually cost far far more relative to income and sucked electricity like crazy. There were also cheaper variants that broke down quickly. It is a mixed bag though. There's a lot of nuance. 
     
    https://www.quora.com/Why-are-home-appliances-of-yester-years-such-as-fridges-and-TVs-much-more-longer-lasting-than-those-of-todays-despite-the-advancement-of-technology
     
    Cars, for example, last around 3x as many miles while requiring less maintenance. They are around 30% more expensive now though. 
     
     
     
  25. Agree
    comander got a reaction from FAZIN in Who would you want to be the successor CEO?   
    Nick Light is the closest to CEO operationally. He probably does a lot of CEO like duties already. 
     
    If you want LMG to be around then you'd want the most prepared person doing the job. 
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